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Reaktor Users Can Starting Playing with Komplete Kontrol Now – Even Without Hardware

hwcontrol

Pretty lights are no fun if they’re off limits. So, Reaktor gurus, your fun starts now. As promised here, you get some example patches to begin working with those light-up keyboards from Native Instruments (Komplete Kontrol S-Series, to be technical). And they’re available now:

Here are two example ensembles showing how to control the KOMPLETE KONTROL S-series LEDs and key properties from Reaktor.

HWControl_BasicUse.ens – can be used with an S-series keyboard to directly control the key LED colours and note properties.

HWControl_KB-LED-Simulator.ens – includes a keyboard LED simulator instrument so that you can test your Reaktor HWControl messages without having an S-series keyboard.

HWControl Module Examples: Hardware Control module examples for builders [Native Instruments User Library]

If only one person reads this article and that person makes something amazing with Reaktor, it’ll be worth it having published it. So do let us know here at the CDM Office Tower. (Dizzying, the view from the executive suites, I will say that.)

Nothing yet for controlling the display text, though – that should be interesting.

See, previously:
Komplete Kontrol Integration Will Work with Your Own Reaktor, Kontakt Creations, Too; Details

The post Reaktor Users Can Starting Playing with Komplete Kontrol Now – Even Without Hardware appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Dystopian Bearded Techno: Watch, Listen to Rødhåd Play and Talk Music [Listening]

rodhad

The phenomenon of techno’s growth right now can’t even be confined to one corner of Berlin. Rødhåd and Dystopian Records demonstrate not only the uncontainable nature of their own particular brand of shadowy dance creations, but perhaps this folk quality of electronically-produced music generally.

And if you happen to like that flavor, we have quite a lot of media for you to gobble up. Dubby, dark, and distant, it’s all as always perfectly constructed, reserved in its trajectory as it builds energy. I suppose it’s predictable that getting Berghain’s stamp of approval brought Rødhåd to an international audience, but it’s just as interesting that he and the Dystopian crew were running their own parties for so long.

Before we get to the music, though, here’s the ever-calm man himself talking to INPUT’s Urban Stories, set against spectacularly futuristic architecture of Tbilisi, Georgia. If the talking head thing isn’t doing it for you, there’s some nice music and slow-motion shimmying later on.

Or – listen/watch:

Video from a live set at France’s Nuits Sonores festival:

Podcast for Groove Magazine (download available):
on SoundCloud, Groove 33

Article for Groove 33 [in German]

And another mix/podcast for Token Records:

rodhod

From La Bacchanale Montréal, also live:

La Bacchanale w/ Rødhåd [LIVE] from La Bacchanale on Vimeo.

And the story behind the scenes:

AfterMovie – La Bacchanale w/Rødhåd from La Bacchanale on Vimeo.

dystopian

With a crowd clad in masks and t-shirts, Dystopian Records did a recent takeover of Boiler Room from their usual party headquarters Arena Club. Here’s Rødhåd from that set:


Rødhåd Boiler Room Berlin DJ Set by brtvofficial

I think it’s also worth watching the younger protege Alex.do, also on Dystopian, who played for hours into the night carrying on the gloomy-but-groovy mood:


Alex.Do Boiler Room Berlin DJ Set by brtvofficial

For teshno, he picks out some records for us – from his first to his latest – and no, not just techno (though about that, he says “forget the world, forget the people, just close your eyes”):
on the record ~ rødhåd

You can follow Rødhåd on Facebook, of course.

The post Dystopian Bearded Techno: Watch, Listen to Rødhåd Play and Talk Music [Listening] appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Meet Bazille, the Obscenely-Massive Monster Modular Synth Plug-in from u-he

Um... excuse me. I'll see you in February or so.

Um… excuse me. I’ll see you in February or so.

Simple, lightweight, minimal.

No, not really.

This is a total monster, the grandest synth yet from plug-in maestro Urs Heckmann, aka u-he. ACE, aka “Any Cable Everywhere,” already introduced us to computer plug-ins with massive tangles of virtual cables – in a good way. Bazille, then, is the plug-in that ate the plug-in that ate Chicago.

And after first making an appearance in 2009, it’s finally here, like a beast foretold in legend.

Its oscillators are digital, with FM (frequency modulation) and phase distortion and the wild-sounding fractal resonance. And then it has analog-style filters. And then it has effects and processors up the wazoo. But, most importantly, it has insane parallel outputs all over the place and the ability to patch anything to anything without ever running out of cables.

It’s not just a bunch of connections and oscillators and effects, though. There are clever wave shapers called mapping generators with drawing tools and the like. There’s a 8x 16-step “morphing” sequencer. When you combine all those oscillators and filters and wave shapers and effects and sequencers, you really have a complete modular sound design environment. There’s not a whole lot of software I want to test at the moment – just being plenty busy with what I’ve got – but this just made the short list. You can test it, too; there’s a free demo download for Mac and Windows.

It’s also on sale for US$89 (before VAT, Europe), which I think is about a third of what users of physical modulars pay for their cabinet, if they’re lucky. (Or, perhaps the IKEA desk it sits on.) Yes, there are advantages to digital and software (ducks). After the intro, it rises to $129.

Watch:

The specs alone will make your eyes bleed:

4 digital oscillators with simultaneous FM (frequency modulation), PD (phase distortion) and FR (fractal resonance)
4 multimode analogue type filters with up to 6 parallel outputs each
4 modelled effects: stereo delay, distortion, phaser, spring reverb
2 LFOs with 3 parallel outputs each
4 ADS(S)R type envelope generators
signal processors: Inverter, rectifier, sample & hold, lag generators and quantizer
2 mapping generators (waveshapers) with a variety of drawing tools and controls
8 x 16-step morphing sequencer
multiplex modules for signal mixing, RM (ring modulation), AM (amplitude modulation)
single-page alternative skin included
microtuning support (.tun files)
multichannel MIDI support
user interface zoom in 10% steps
over 1700 presets…

Bazille @ u-he.com

Bazille_1_tweak

The post Meet Bazille, the Obscenely-Massive Monster Modular Synth Plug-in from u-he appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Spatial Audio, Explained: How the 4DSOUND System Could Change How You Hear [Videos]

It was inspired by Nikolas Tesla’s radical ideas about energy in air – and site-specific opera. It breaks every notion you have of how to mix, how to set volume, and what “panning” or “stereo” means. It’s, specifically, the forest of metal columns filled with omni-directional speakers we’ve come to know as 4DSOUND. And it’s all coming to Amsterdam Dance Event in October in a big way.

But what’s most important about 4DSOUND isn’t just this particular, not-inexpensive and specific installation. It’s the fact that once you start imagining sound as virtually projected into three-dimensional space, you probably won’t really think about sound in the same way.

Taking something like a site-specific spatial audio system and putting it into an online video is a recipe for failure. But the team at Ableton have done a pretty bang-on job of doing just that in two films, one focused more on the system in general and its significance, and one on specifically how the technique works.

Various composers have worked on 4DSOUND; this film focuses on Stimming. That makes an interesting choice, because his set is so live. In his work, Ableton Live is mostly a control interface for the spatialization; its audio duties are limited to mixing in the system and adding some clips. Everything else is outboard, like the MFB Tanzbär drum machine, a Teenage Engineering OP-1, and an acoustic piano.

Just as important, 4DSOUND’s Paul Oomen, a classical composer, talks about the connections to Tesla and theater. See the deeper meaning introduced at top, then the technical – and thoughts for the future – below.

With that conceptual background, it’s likewise important to understand that this system is neither a surround setup like those in cinemas (most recently Dolby’s Atmos), nor Wave Field Synthesis.

Cinema sound is generally a different animal. Those systems, or crude systems like quad (or even stereo), are capable of spatializing sounds, but they’re dependent on listener position. Wave field synthesis is closer, in that it does produce virtual sonic locations, as if sounds are in specific places beyond the speakers, even as you move around. Wave field is also interesting in that it has been adopted by MPEG. But wave field synthesis, while very precise, works on a horizontal plane, and requires very specific settings and speakers.

4DSOUND takes a different approach, using something called vertical phantom imaging. By taking advantage of omni-directional speakers, they get the advantages of virtual projection – that illusion that sounds fill specific locations or volumes – without requiring so many speakers or particular environments. That makes a unique sound space in which artists can play, and while this isn’t cheap or yet ready for club environments, it is able to make it to festivals. 4DSOUND came to Berlin’s Atonal Festival last month, for instance, and in a series of events (including a lab co-hosted by CDM), will next head back to Amsterdam Dance Event.

I’ve been working with 4DSOUND now in my own music, in a collaboration with Robert Lippok, and it’s been a unique learning experience. I couldn’t agree more with Stimming that it can change how you listen to music and sonic environments. Stereo is artificial enough that it’s easy to lose sight of sounds in terms of how they exist in space. It’s simply too distant from how we hear. But when you can manipulate sounds in a virtual environment, you really begin to appreciate the spatial as a compositional element.

In our project, we’re working to use those elements to create our own virtual architectures. It’s a first opportunity to see how you might perceive architecture purely as sonic, non-physical form. We’re working with Berlin’s Arno Brandlhuber, who constructed a form in a proposal for housing that perfectly fits the grid of the 4DSOUND – real and virtual.

lippokkirn

lippokkirn2

lippokkirn3

Above: Translating architecture into sound, in process on 4DSOUND. Photos by Robert Lippok.

As seen in the video, you’re not only positioning sounds: you can produce volumes, paths with motion, and create effects that are calculated around the space (for reflections, delays, and more). You can add Doppler effect and other filtering to enhance the illusion that sound sources are moving around you. You can create sonic perceptions that seem real, and others that would normally be impossible.

To implement this system, you’re granted per-voice controls of each sonic object. Ableton Live is a bit ill-equipped to work in this way; music software in general is built around mixers that assume stereo recordings are the end result. But those voices are represented by graphical controls added to an Ableton session, built in Max for Live. It in turn is a front-end, alongside a Lemur remote control communicating over OSC, for a back-end system that does the processing necessary to pipe 57 channels of audio out the RME audio interfaces to the amps. (The back end is built in Max/MSP, with apparently heavy use of gen~ DSP objects for performance.)

So many of our sonic habits have been constructed by the stereo mixdown and its crude virtual space that we may be unaware how much it impacts our composition and sound design. So it’s interesting to listen to a binaural recording of Stimming. You’ll want to not only listen to headphones, but be patient as the work builds up. Obviously, even binaural recordings don’t really capture the impact. But you will begin to hear panning that’s vertical, with a great deal of distance in the mix rather than the packed recordings common in dance music. This will be less evident if you haven’t heard the 4D in person, but a lot of the timbres you hear, the sense of these sonic objects in some real space and the way they reverberate, is also a feature of working in this way. It will no doubt transform habits producing and mixing even in stereo – once you’ve done this, you can’t ever go back to even mono and stereo in the same way.

Stimming explains:

Equipment used: MFB Tanzbär, Clavia Nordrack2, TeenageEngineering OP-1, Arturia Microbrute and AbletonLive as master clock, sampler and midi sequencer.

Everything on the 4D sound was tweaked by hand in real-time, as well as the whole arrangement. I preprogrammed some chords and grooves on my machines though.

The 4D System is an advanced spatial sound system and the set is binaural (also called dummy head) recorded – in order to get an idea of how it sounded you need to use your headphones.

For the full binaural experience, I made the lossless AIFF file available for download. Please note that the download is over 1 GB in size.

Imagine being INSIDE the music, and the sounds move around you in all three dimensions.

It really is thinking in four dimensions – the three spatial dimensions, plus time (and adding that fourth element truly feels like a fourth dimension).

And the 4DSOUND setup is complex enough to feel like an instrument, the combination of its spatial capabilities and various effects and live controls.

So, it’s significant that in Amsterdam, we’ll have a full program of new music for the 4DSOUND (including Stimming, a Raster Noton showcase including Robert and myself along Grischa Lichtenberger, Frank Bretschneider, and Senking), Max Cooper, and Vladislav Delay.

It’s just as important that we’ll have developers from Ableton joining a select lineup of artists and researchers of lots of backgrounds on Spatial Audio Hack Lab we’re co-hosting. We have everyone from doctoral experts in spatialization to singers.

This isn’t a gimmick or a fad or some cool new toy. There is a lot of work remaining to be done, on 4DSOUND and spatial audio in general. The 4DSOUND itself is a canvas for all kinds of work; it’s not obvious how to work with it or what it should do. Imagining how interfaces should look is a wide-open question. And on 4D and spatial audio in general, there’s a huge opening for people to suggest new ideas for sound, composition, performance, and control. That can relate to architecture, to data sonification, to simulation. In Paul’s case, sensors on singers can produce a new way of enhancing theatre with amplified and electronic sound, as audio follows performers.

And the whole field is about to blow wide open. New microphone and headphone technology could make 4DSOUND’s specific system still more relevant – a playground for challenging ideas that will become increasingly commonplace.

So, if you’re in Amsterdam, I hope you’ll join us. If not, we’ll keep piping these spatial possibilities to you.

thinkingin3d_1

thinkingin3d_2

thinkingin3d_3

Thinking in 3D – or 4D – will be a new challenge. Above, photos from our recent working sessions.

Amsterdam events:
http://www.facebook.com/4dsoundonline

More of the latest from 4DSOUND:
http://4dsound.net/news/

The post Spatial Audio, Explained: How the 4DSOUND System Could Change How You Hear [Videos] appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Spatial Audio, Explained: How the 4DSOUND System Could Change How You Hear [Videos]

It was inspired by Nikolas Tesla’s radical ideas about energy in air – and site-specific opera. It breaks every notion you have of how to mix, how to set volume, and what “panning” or “stereo” means. It’s, specifically, the forest of metal columns filled with omni-directional speakers we’ve come to know as 4DSOUND. And it’s all coming to Amsterdam Dance Event in October in a big way.

But what’s most important about 4DSOUND isn’t just this particular, not-inexpensive and specific installation. It’s the fact that once you start imagining sound as virtually projected into three-dimensional space, you probably won’t really think about sound in the same way.

Taking something like a site-specific spatial audio system and putting it into an online video is a recipe for failure. But the team at Ableton have done a pretty bang-on job of doing just that in two films, one focused more on the system in general and its significance, and one on specifically how the technique works.

Various composers have worked on 4DSOUND; this film focuses on Stimming. That makes an interesting choice, because his set is so live. In his work, Ableton Live is mostly a control interface for the spatialization; its audio duties are limited to mixing in the system and adding some clips. Everything else is outboard, like the MFB Tanzbär drum machine, a Teenage Engineering OP-1, and an acoustic piano.

Just as important, 4DSOUND’s Paul Oomen, a classical composer, talks about the connections to Tesla and theater. See the deeper meaning introduced at top, then the technical – and thoughts for the future – below.

With that conceptual background, it’s likewise important to understand that this system is neither a surround setup like those in cinemas (most recently Dolby’s Atmos), nor Wave Field Synthesis.

Cinema sound is generally a different animal. Those systems, or crude systems like quad (or even stereo), are capable of spatializing sounds, but they’re dependent on listener position. Wave field synthesis is closer, in that it does produce virtual sonic locations, as if sounds are in specific places beyond the speakers, even as you move around. Wave field is also interesting in that it has been adopted by MPEG. But wave field synthesis, while very precise, works on a horizontal plane, and requires very specific settings and speakers.

4DSOUND takes a different approach, using something called vertical phantom imaging. By taking advantage of omni-directional speakers, they get the advantages of virtual projection – that illusion that sounds fill specific locations or volumes – without requiring so many speakers or particular environments. That makes a unique sound space in which artists can play, and while this isn’t cheap or yet ready for club environments, it is able to make it to festivals. 4DSOUND came to Berlin’s Atonal Festival last month, for instance, and in a series of events (including a lab co-hosted by CDM), will next head back to Amsterdam Dance Event.

I’ve been working with 4DSOUND now in my own music, in a collaboration with Robert Lippok, and it’s been a unique learning experience. I couldn’t agree more with Stimming that it can change how you listen to music and sonic environments. Stereo is artificial enough that it’s easy to lose sight of sounds in terms of how they exist in space. It’s simply too distant from how we hear. But when you can manipulate sounds in a virtual environment, you really begin to appreciate the spatial as a compositional element.

In our project, we’re working to use those elements to create our own virtual architectures. It’s a first opportunity to see how you might perceive architecture purely as sonic, non-physical form. We’re working with Berlin’s Arno Brandlhuber, who constructed a form in a proposal for housing that perfectly fits the grid of the 4DSOUND – real and virtual.

lippokkirn

lippokkirn2

lippokkirn3

Above: Translating architecture into sound, in process on 4DSOUND. Photos by Robert Lippok.

As seen in the video, you’re not only positioning sounds: you can produce volumes, paths with motion, and create effects that are calculated around the space (for reflections, delays, and more). You can add Doppler effect and other filtering to enhance the illusion that sound sources are moving around you. You can create sonic perceptions that seem real, and others that would normally be impossible.

To implement this system, you’re granted per-voice controls of each sonic object. Ableton Live is a bit ill-equipped to work in this way; music software in general is built around mixers that assume stereo recordings are the end result. But those voices are represented by graphical controls added to an Ableton session, built in Max for Live. It in turn is a front-end, alongside a Lemur remote control communicating over OSC, for a back-end system that does the processing necessary to pipe 57 channels of audio out the RME audio interfaces to the amps. (The back end is built in Max/MSP, with apparently heavy use of gen~ DSP objects for performance.)

So many of our sonic habits have been constructed by the stereo mixdown and its crude virtual space that we may be unaware how much it impacts our composition and sound design. So it’s interesting to listen to a binaural recording of Stimming. You’ll want to not only listen to headphones, but be patient as the work builds up. Obviously, even binaural recordings don’t really capture the impact. But you will begin to hear panning that’s vertical, with a great deal of distance in the mix rather than the packed recordings common in dance music. This will be less evident if you haven’t heard the 4D in person, but a lot of the timbres you hear, the sense of these sonic objects in some real space and the way they reverberate, is also a feature of working in this way. It will no doubt transform habits producing and mixing even in stereo – once you’ve done this, you can’t ever go back to even mono and stereo in the same way.

Stimming explains:

Equipment used: MFB Tanzbär, Clavia Nordrack2, TeenageEngineering OP-1, Arturia Microbrute and AbletonLive as master clock, sampler and midi sequencer.

Everything on the 4D sound was tweaked by hand in real-time, as well as the whole arrangement. I preprogrammed some chords and grooves on my machines though.

The 4D System is an advanced spatial sound system and the set is binaural (also called dummy head) recorded – in order to get an idea of how it sounded you need to use your headphones.

For the full binaural experience, I made the lossless AIFF file available for download. Please note that the download is over 1 GB in size.

Imagine being INSIDE the music, and the sounds move around you in all three dimensions.

It really is thinking in four dimensions – the three spatial dimensions, plus time (and adding that fourth element truly feels like a fourth dimension).

And the 4DSOUND setup is complex enough to feel like an instrument, the combination of its spatial capabilities and various effects and live controls.

So, it’s significant that in Amsterdam, we’ll have a full program of new music for the 4DSOUND (including Stimming, a Raster Noton showcase including Robert and myself along Grischa Lichtenberger, Frank Bretschneider, and Senking), Max Cooper, and Vladislav Delay.

It’s just as important that we’ll have developers from Ableton joining a select lineup of artists and researchers of lots of backgrounds on Spatial Audio Hack Lab we’re co-hosting. We have everyone from doctoral experts in spatialization to singers.

This isn’t a gimmick or a fad or some cool new toy. There is a lot of work remaining to be done, on 4DSOUND and spatial audio in general. The 4DSOUND itself is a canvas for all kinds of work; it’s not obvious how to work with it or what it should do. Imagining how interfaces should look is a wide-open question. And on 4D and spatial audio in general, there’s a huge opening for people to suggest new ideas for sound, composition, performance, and control. That can relate to architecture, to data sonification, to simulation. In Paul’s case, sensors on singers can produce a new way of enhancing theatre with amplified and electronic sound, as audio follows performers.

And the whole field is about to blow wide open. New microphone and headphone technology could make 4DSOUND’s specific system still more relevant – a playground for challenging ideas that will become increasingly commonplace.

So, if you’re in Amsterdam, I hope you’ll join us. If not, we’ll keep piping these spatial possibilities to you.

thinkingin3d_1

thinkingin3d_2

thinkingin3d_3

Thinking in 3D – or 4D – will be a new challenge. Above, photos from our recent working sessions.

Amsterdam events:
http://www.facebook.com/4dsoundonline

More of the latest from 4DSOUND:
http://4dsound.net/news/

The post Spatial Audio, Explained: How the 4DSOUND System Could Change How You Hear [Videos] appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Watch Adriano Make Surprising Objects, Laser Beams into Triggers for Wild Music

adriano

Now that anything can become an instrument, musicianship can become the practice of finding the spirit in the unexpected. It’s what Matt Moldover championed in the notion of controllerism, what years of DIYers have made evident. It’s not just a matter of finding a novelty or two. It’s really taking those novelties and making them a creative force.

Adriano Clemente, the Italian-born, Brooklyn-based artist (aka Capcom), is a shining light of just that sort of imagination. Regular CDM readers will see some familiar techniques. There’s a laser harp, a circuit-bent toy, mic transducers making objects into triggers, a Numark Orbit controller, a LEAP Motion, a Kinect, an Ableton Push, and I’m fairly sure that’s fellow Italian Marco Donnarumma’s wonderful Xth Sense controller in VICE/Motherboard’s featurette on the artist. But it’s the way Adriano puts it all together that becomes the magic.
c
To put it simply, it’s hard not to get infected by his enthusiasm. He doesn’t just play these unusual objects – he really plays. He’s exploring the reality around him.

This is in fact the perfect companion to last week’s story by Matt Earp, with Spanish artist Ain TheMachine:
Music That’s All Human Body and Objects, No Instruments: Biotronica with Ain TheMachine [Interview]

The scene for this kind of work, once limited to isolated experiments and academia, is really heating up. It’s actually becoming a realm in which people are outdoing one another, as the world community of experimental performance grows.

I think readers here will also respond to what Adriano says about encountering conservatism – about the people who try to put these different approaches into boxes. (The “that isn’t real music” argument is something we’ve all certainly found.)

Watching the VICE video, you may miss out on Adriano’s musical versatility – and there’s a lot. So, here’s more to see. He isn’t just using odd DIY tools; he mixes familiar options like Ableton Live and conventional MIDI controllers with more experimental approaches, and teaches both, as well. (He’s on the faculty at New York’s Dubspot – and now runs their mysterious and intriguing Dubspot Labs.)

I find his music across genres to be really evocative. Here’s a quick experiment with custom Rutt Etra-style visuals and rather lovely music.

Analog Cubes Processing / Rutt Etra Studies- Adriano Clemente from adriano clemente on Vimeo.

In Den Haag, NL, he turned Leap Motion into a triply gestural controller for light and sound – a kind of Theremin light and sound organ. Done before? Oh, indeed. But by mixing in clever, glitchy rhythmic element, he ramped up the expressive, fun quality of that interaction. Implementation is everything. Visuals here are produced by Resolume Arena with sound by Ableton Live.

But he’s just at home improvising on more conventional controllers. Here he is (for Dubspot) on Ableton Push and (for KORG) on the Korg Tra. I actually think this is a better demonstration of Push improvisation than the promo videos Ableton themselves produced – but, then, Adriano has done a lot of expert work with setup. Ahem – that is to say, he can make the rest of us look clumsy. (I’d better practice my Push routines.)

Adriano on the setup:

In this video, I’ve made an effort to concentrate on the major features and options that users have to perform with in Ableton Push. I want to clarify that I don’t necessarily define Push as a performance controller, nor do I use it Live as a only component of my rig, it’s more a studio buddy which helps me to transport the experience of making music into a more engaging dimension and let me escape the classic keyboard-mouse setting. – Adriano Clemente

This sure does look like a performance to me, though I understand that he’s choosing different tools in his main performance rig. But maybe that’s the point: this sort of live improvisation can invigorate studio work, too.

He goes into more detail on the Dubspot blog.

With KORG taktile, he blows a huge hole with my previous argument that you don’t necessarily want pads on a keyboard by showing just what you can do combining a keyboard with X/Y controller and pads all in one device. (This is part of what makes KORG taktile an interesting rival to Native Instruments’ Komplete Kontrol – the NI option is more minimal, which could be a factor depending on your tastes.)

None of this would be worthwhile if it was just flailing arms around. Fortunately, his music can send you into a state of glitches-out mental vacation. For instance, here he is going nuts in a trippy, game-inspired world:

And there’s a lot more on SoundCloud:

adrianobrooklyn

Previously, I covered his Kinect work.

Ableton has the best profile of his background and inspiration – as much about the nature of the interactions he explores as it is about their products:
Adriano Clemente: Human Interaction

You’ll find lots more via his official site (including links to social media):

http://www.adrianoclemente.com

Thanks, Adriano, for the latest inspiration!

The post Watch Adriano Make Surprising Objects, Laser Beams into Triggers for Wild Music appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Hands on with Dave Smith Pro 2: “The Most Useful Synth I’ve Ever Played”

Synthesist Chris Stack has had his hands on a lot of gear – and a lot of it with the Moog Music moniker on it. But every chance he gets, he’s bugging me about how in love he is with the Dave Smith Pro 2, the richly-appointed, nicely-overpowered monosynth on steroids as we described it earlier this summer.

And he’s having a lot of fun, transforming it into a hybrid digital/audio “hub” – a sound source, but also a central brain for exceptional soundscapes.

And in Chris’ hands, I’m certainly convinced, as this beast sequences beautiful frontiers of noise and melody. Just like Chris, making us lust after a synth over the weekend. But, as this often comes up in comments, my interest is never in whether you have to have some particular bit of kit. To me, the fusion of musicianship and instrument building is always inspiring – it’s something we can take back to our own work, whatever we’re using. Here’s Chris on his summer fling with this synth:

The Dave Smith Instruments Pro 2 is the most useful synth I’ve ever played. I got to borrow one for a short while and it quickly became the central control and performance hub of my analog and digital gear. In addition to its great internal sounds, with four assignable CV Outputs (and four inputs!), it (much like the Moog Multi-Pedal) is able to lend new functionality to your older existing gear.

For example, a Moog Voyager sounds great but it has (for all practical purposes) no MIDI clock synced features. Pair it with a Pro 2, though, and you can control things like the Voyager’s filter cutoff, volume, pan, wave shape and more with the Pro 2′s clock-synced LFOs, step sequencer tracks, envelopes and a variety of other elements.

I had a lot of fun connecting to multiple synths, starting the sequencer, and tweaking knobs. This video does not go into minute detail on showing how I did all this. It is meant as a quick look at some amazing possibilities. Think of it more as an “inspirational” than a “tutorial”. I wish I had more time to explore applications of the the Pro 2 while I had it.

And more videos:

The post Hands on with Dave Smith Pro 2: “The Most Useful Synth I’ve Ever Played” appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Listen to Gerhard Behles (CEO, Ableton) and Matt Black (Ninja Tune, Coldcut) on Music and Democratization


Music in the Age of Democratization: Gerhard… by SMWBerlin

Music as social medium is perhaps as profound as any connection as we can have between people. And it’s a unique pleasure to get to reflect on that with someone like Gerhard Behles or Matt Black. Yesterday, we got both at the same time. I’ll even listen to this conversation again; there’s plenty of fuel for further thought.

Before apps, Gerhard Behles and Robert Henke shared their Monolake Max/MSP sequencer (by Henke – still available); back when music production offered little in real-time, they had the vision to offer Ableton Live. When “VJ” still meant a host on MTV, Matt Black was building new tools to remix video alongside music, inspired by hip-hop technique to re-conceive digital expression and sampling.

Now, Ableton serves millions of users; Matt Black and Ninja Tune encourage users to remix their artists on their phones with Ninja Jamm.

And it seems anyone, anywhere can produce. Matt and Gerhard reflected with me yesterday on where they’ve come from, where their endeavors are today, and where we’re headed.

They got deep into the philosophy of why we make music, and where their responsibilities lie as tool makers and as individuals, where artists and labels and communities might go.

We have audio on SoundCloud:

And video (top).

Thanks to Social Media Week Berlin and Platoon for hosting us!

The post Listen to Gerhard Behles (CEO, Ableton) and Matt Black (Ninja Tune, Coldcut) on Music and Democratization appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Crazy Video: Giant Robot Cassette Kills Giant Robot iPod Classic

The iPod Classic is dead, sure.

Now it’s really dead. And the cassette player outlasts its shiny Apple hipster-fashion-accessory counterpart with the non-removable battery – by kicking its sorry ass with a giant mecha fist punch to the face.

Hold on… if it seems we may be losing our grip on reality, that’s just because we’re entering the wild world of cassette label / music collective Chrome Brulée.

The retro-electro artists, comprising Tony Johnson, Michael Shredlove, Alex Mayhem, Kid Supreme, Aximus & Club Cannibal, make music that’s intentionally backwards-looking, and then release it on cassettes. And then they make crazy trip-out videos with vintage-styled computer graphics and impossibly-high 80s-ish production values, all in a cranked-up hyperactive fantasy world that looks like you had way too much of one of those nondescript sugary goo/slime concoctions marketed to young Americans as candy.

And they aren’t letting the iPod Classic go quietly into that good night. Cassette mechs triumph.

Through this hallucination, you will learn something about the ability to buy their cassette tapes, too. Happy Cassette Store Day, iPod drones. But if you just haven’t tripped enough, let’s have some more videos.

Not on SoundCloud, because it wasn’t invented in 1981, but music videos were. These VHS tapes apparently found their way through a wormhole and onto your YouTube.

But there’s a Website, because some of them… time traveled.

http://chromebrulee.com

The post Crazy Video: Giant Robot Cassette Kills Giant Robot iPod Classic appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Live Stream: Ableton’s Gerhard Behles and Ninja Tune’s Matt Black Talk to CDM


Music in the Age of Democratization: Gerhard… by SMWBerlin

Today is Social Media Week in Berlin and various other cities across the world. I’m fortunate to get to join Gerhard Behles, co-founder and CEO of Ableton, and Matt Black, co-founder of Coldcut and Ninja Tune, in discussion. If you’re in Berlin, you can join us in person; the event is free. But we’re also live streaming from 14:05 Berlin time (08:05 over your cup of morning coffee New York, or California… uh, you might wait for the recording if you aren’t an early riser, that’s 05:05.) We expect to have higher-quality audio after the event.

It’s a great chance to get these two in a room together, because of where they’ve been, what they’re doing, and where we’re all going. Description:

It’s impossible to talk about music today without talking about production. If recording robbed music of its democratic aspect, digital production has made it democratic and performative again. But how do you cope with that new-found global overabundance? To answer that question, we’re joined by two of the people who have been deeply involved with the evolution of modern audiovisual performance on machines.

Gerhard Behles and Matt Black have each had a hand both as artists and technologists in the way in which music today is made. Behles was co-founder of the musical act Monolake, ground-breaking artists who would even release a Max patches alongside a record, before becoming co-founder and CEO of Ableton. With millions of users, Ableton Live (and now Push) have helped transform the use of computers in music making and performance.

Matt Black’s own career has parallels – half of the music duo Coldcut, his VJamm software pioneered live computer visuals. He is co-founder of NinjaTune, and on both the artist and label side has had enormous influence on music and technology alike. One of the first to make use of games and interactive media, he’s again challenging the notion of what makes a record with iOS remix app Ninja Jamm.

Black and Behles are hosted by Peter Kirn, editor of CDM (createdigitalmusic.com), which has chronicled the shifting relationship of tech and creativity over the past ten years.

Official event page

Dailymotion streaming page

The post Live Stream: Ableton’s Gerhard Behles and Ninja Tune’s Matt Black Talk to CDM appeared first on Create Digital Music.