Ableton-Live

Free Ableton Live Rack Based On The Moog Mother 32

Reader Gianclaudio Moniri has released a free Live Rack, based on the sound of the Moog Mother 32 analog synthesizer. … Read More Free Ableton Live Rack Based On The Moog Mother 32

BSOD simulates the sound your laptop makes when it crashes

Finally! Now you don’t have to wait for your computer to start glitching out – you can make it happen yourself, with this inexpensive Max for Live device.

Okay, so technically what we’re talking about is a “stockastic sample freezing effect.” Since it’s a Max for Live Device, you can drop its audio-munching powers on any track you want, making for glitched out percussion, vocals, or whatever you like. But if you’ve ever watched a computer melt down and listened to the resulting sounds and thought, “hey, actually, I could use that” – this is for you.

The reason it matches a BSOD is, computer stability issues cause the digital audio buffer to “freeze” on particular sounds rather than continue to process buffered audio normally. (Digital audio systems give the illusion of running in real time, without losing a continuous stream of audio, by dividing digital audio into chunks and feeding those chunks in sequence to the audio card… so that if the machine falls behind a few samples, you won’t notice.)

This creation is the second Max for Live invention from Isotonik Studios today – happy Valentine’s Day, y’all – and carries the price of €9.52. For that, you get some control over the effect – especially since it isn’t actually crashing your machine. The developers describe the parameters as follows:

Freeze: control the gate frequency in time signatures
Width: make the gating wider or tighter
Dry/Wet: master dry/wet control

And all of this is MIDI-controllable.

If you want to live more dangerously, the classic Smart Electronix effect Buffer Override actually does screw around with your machine. The work of developer Sophia Poirier, this is the opposite of what would normally constitute a stable plug-in. The idea: it “overcomes your host app’s audio processing buffer size and then (unsuccessfully) overrides that new buffer size to be a smaller buffer size.”

Beware, as that will actually cause some hosts to, you know, crash. But Buffer Override is free. (Well, it’d be a bit strange to charge for that!)

http://destroyfx.smartelectronix.com/

For safer, more playable operation, you should stick to Isotonik Studios’ creation. Have at it:

https://isotonikstudios.com/product/bsod/

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This free Multi Analyzer shows why Live 10 multichannel Max is cool

The big Max for Live news in Live 10 isn’t actually “integration.” It’s finally having multichannel audio support. Here’s a free tool to get you started.

“Wait, wait… weren’t we supposed to be excited about Max for Live integration in Live 10?” Well, yes… kinda sorta. Basically, if you’ve got Live 10 Suite, you get a single installer, less version confusion, and you don’t see that silly Max splash screen the first time you launch a Device.

That’s all well and good, but it’s not a reason to upgrade to Live 10, or even something you’ll really notice in day to day use.

Now, multichannel support, on the other hand – that’s a big deal. And it’ll be a big deal even if you never touch Max yourself, because suddenly the little Max for Live toys you grab will get a whole lot more interesting.

What Live 10 adds to Max for Live is the ability to route any audio inputs you want into a Device, and to any outputs, including to arbitrary tracks. The implications for that are varied: wild sidechaining, panners, spatial audio, multichannel effects – think basically anything that goes beyond just having stereo inserts and sends from a single track. It’s something that really ought to have been in the first release of Max for Live, but now that it’s there, it opens the floodgates to neat new patches.

That also Live up to some of the original promise of Max for Live, which is finding creative applications beyond what’s covered by the usual plug-ins.

But to get us started, here’s a more utilitarian application – and a cool one.

The fine folks at Isotonik Studios have whipped up a “Multi Analyzer” – a spectral analyzer that lets you compare tracks and view them at once. And that, of course, is actually what you’d want to do with such a tool, when finding mixing issues and the like. (Hey, Ableton – take note. This should be built in.)

You can route in up to four tracks and view their spectrum visually.

Clever stuff, and the price is free. I got it up and running in about a minute with a track I was looking at today, and it’s really handy for mixing.

Now, if you’ve been paying attention, it should go without saying that you’re going to need a copy of Max for Live (that is, Live 10 Suite edition) and Live 10 as a minimum version, since Live 9 doesn’t have this feature.

Got it? Good. Here’s the download:

https://isotonikstudios.com/product/multi-analyzer-live-10-audio-tool/

I’m very interested in the applications of this for Live users. And multichannel diffusion and spatial audio remain interesting, not only in Live but across electronic music. Hopefully more on all of this soon.

The post This free Multi Analyzer shows why Live 10 multichannel Max is cool appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Animatek Brings UZZ Step Sequencer To Ableton Live 10

UZZ 3.1 is a 16-step sequencer, where you can adjust each parameter in every step independently. … Read More Animatek Brings UZZ Step Sequencer To Ableton Live 10

Admina and the patriarchy-smashing edges of Bucharest’s underground

Call it a second post-Communist Romanian revolution: artists are reshaping the scene just as quickly as they can keep the clubs open. Meet Admina and Corp.

We were inspired by Admina’s performance on the Moogfest stream, and her musical reputation precedes her, as a kind of hero to similar counter-cultural scenes tucked here and there worldwide. Simona Mantarlian, a DJ/critic, Bucharest insider, and native Romanian herself, talks to Admina about the scene and how it connects to musical life . There, finding a space is a matter of personal, creative, real survival – but it’s also working, and that means there’s a lot for us to learn from Bucharest’s fringe frontiers. -Ed.

Bucharest is a fast-paced stellar ride, defying entropy, as its underground dance clubs open — and reach insolvency — and find another way to surface and go on. We’re talking about epic places like Ponton [see here and here for an impression], then Kran, and also the abrupt curve Control Club has followed after its rebranding, where underground bookings came back on the roster after a posh-makeover-phase — we’ll pass.

The constant that drives the process lays in the strong crews of selectors, who never compromise in the quality, levity, and obscurity of their finds. A new crew called Corp. caught our attention through its podcasts and intense activity around the scene. The female and queer collective, founded by [European supported] SHAPE platform resident Chlorys and DJ/ producer Admina, pushed a new generation of musicians whose voices challenge the male-dominated status quo. We spoke with Admina about the context of Corp.’s philosophy, and took a virtual trip to Bucharest’s queer parties, transporting us to a new post-Internet realm, and beyond.

Admina’s video: Destroy Patriarchy.

Simona: First, what is Corp., and what are you up to with it?

Admina: Corp. is a Bucharest-based project and platform. It aims to represent and showcase female-identified musicians and DJs in electronic music, while also being dedicated to acquiring and exposing obscure sounds, spanning from experimental and traditional forms to contemporary ones. Its activity is dedicated to broadening the focus on female-identified artists within the context of Bucharest’s local scene, as well as beyond the borders of the country.

The main urgent drive behind Corp.’s initiative is to open and sustain a studio where women will have the space and time to further develop their skills and communicate.

Corp. members: Admina, Beatrice Sommer, Chlorys, Cosima von Bülove.

A few weeks ago, you were part of the all-female-identified stream that launched Moogfest. What did it mean for you to be involved in this Moogfest stream, and in the lineup? Is it significant to you that they did choose to feature women and non-binary artists in this context of the stream and announcement?

Being part of [Moogfest] is a good opportunity for me and also for Corp. It’s great exposure; I’m really glad and excited that I’m part of the show.

Can you tell us a little bit about your live performance there?

I thought of myself being most of the time a nostalgic and melancholic person. Music was also a guide for me. It’s hard to show those feelings while you are playing a set for people to dance, but I always try to get that feeling on the stage. So maybe I will use this opportunity embrace this through dark and experimental sounds — a little bit of sadness and nostalgia.

So, “destroy patriarchy.” Is patriarchy at home in Romania? What is the society like?

Every society is to a certain extent patriarchal; each society “encourages” differences between men and women, in the way they are educated, treated, taught, etc. Romania remains a patriarchal society, where women are perceived mainly as wives and mothers and are denied access to more powerful positions in the business world.

How does Corp. as collective relate to that?

Gender inequalities are a reality in our country. Corp. is proposing an incipient ambition to construct a new language for sexual (gender) politics in the Romanian electronic scene and clubbing.

We want to establish identity as power, a collective visibility. Identity as a declaration of the self, identity as claiming and naming common qualities.

There weren’t many women DJing in Bucharest, say, two years ago, and we can rightfully say things have changed. What was the reaction of the guys in the scene? Were they helpful with putting up Corp. gigs at the clubs they were booking?

Parallel to Corp.’s foundation in Romania, in Western Europe and America, voices of women in electronic music began to be heard. And their gender equality statistics were worrying already for many festivals and clubs around the world.

So, when we started Corp platform, let’s say that the idea was well received, the promoters and organizers have begun to pay more attention to gender equality in lineups.

Watching “Destroy Patriarchy”, the video for your first single, I recognized a lot of new DJs from Bucharest who are getting popular right now, beyond the limits of Bucharest-universe (Beatrice Sommer, Paula Dunker, boivoid, Ana Secheres). Some of them learned their skills via Corp. crew. What made you decide to do the opposite of what everybody does – share knowledge instead of putting extra effort to make it even more inaccessible?

The project also aspires to go beyond the performing artists and to include studio musicians, producers, sound engineers, technicians, cover artists, distributors, promoters, and festival organizers. We want to share everything we know with others. It’s not a big deal to play music. It’s simple, you just have to enjoy music and have the pleasure to share it with others. Why not be accessible to everyone — especially women and queer people who did not have access to technology, or trust to do it? We want to build that trust together. Let’s remember that music is there to bring people together and to create a community.

Back to “Destroy Patriarchy”, where did you record and mix the music and what’s the gear you used?

“Destroy Patriarchy” is a reaction to an oppressive system, aiming to send out a clear and empowering message. The video was recorded at Kiseleff Park in the specially-designed space for outdoor fitness. The music I made it in Ableton using an Akai MPK Mini MIDI controller.

Your nickname has an early internet / message board-era ring to it. How did it find you? What is your connection to the Internet?

Everything started with the word admin, and that was my first idea of DJ nickname. At that time I managed Facebook pages to make money, and it was just funny to call myself like that. And because in English the word didn’t have a feminine pronoun, I only heard about administratrix, which sounds totally hot, but it was too long and I didn’t want that much to assume a gender since I identify myself as a non-binary. With all of that, my friends have found a way to feminize it. Putting an “a” to the end, made it sound more feminine in Romanian. After that I found out, that Admina is actually a name, a Hebrew name, and it means “Of the red earth.” “People with this name have a deep inner desire to inspire others in a higher cause, and to share their own strongly held views on spiritual matters.” I said it was perfect for me.

What is the earliest memory that you track your obsession with music to?

When I was very young, I wanted to play the violin, but I went to fine art school eventually, because my mother had no money to buy me a violin and it was impossible to go to the music school without it. Now I am very glad I didn’t. I consider my visual experience very useful and closely related to how I understood music now.

What is the starting place you’d recommend to someone who never got into electronic music before?

To trust themselves … I don’t know what point is best for someone. Just begin with what they have already, and they will learn on the way what they need. It’s good to have a limited number of tools; it makes you more creative.

Tell us about a fun club experience we missed in Bucharest.

It’s good to know that we have Queer Night. It’s the only fun club experience I really enjoy ever ytime, because we all can be ourselves. Also we intend to organize our own parties in Bucharest so — be prepared!

The post Admina and the patriarchy-smashing edges of Bucharest’s underground appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Ableton Shreds: This Live 10 video is … maybe more like your real life

Okay, so – someone has taken the Live 10 demo video, and made a “shreds” overdub, and … well, we all feel it, don’t we?

Behold:

Thank you, Michael Chmst Snyder, whoever you are. This.

Can’t … stop … watching.

Ableton editorial, it’s your move. You could hire this guy, or… well, wait, is that really a question, even? Do it.

The post Ableton Shreds: This Live 10 video is … maybe more like your real life appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Everything You Wanted To Know About Ableton Live 10

Here’s an in-depth look at the major new features in Live 10, and how they can be used in making a new track.… Read More Everything You Wanted To Know About Ableton Live 10

Roland Intros SPD-SX Special Edition Sampling Pad

The SPD-SX Special Edition offers all the functionality of the standard SPD-SX, but with expanded onboard storage capacity. Users can store up to 16 GB of samples on board. … Read More Roland Intros SPD-SX Special Edition Sampling Pad

Ableton Live 10 now in public beta; here’s what you need to know

Electronic musicians have been living with the idea of Live 10 for a while. Now, the actual software is available in a public beta. Here’s how it works.

Who can join the public beta?

You need a registered copy of Ableton Live 9 Standard or Live 9 Suite. Earlier versions and entry level/bundled versions of the software don’t qualify.

How do I join in?

Ableton uses bug tracker Centercode to share current in-development testing builds of their software, and to collect data on how you’re using it. If you have one of those Live 9 serials, you can sign up directly:

https://ableton.centercode.com/

Why is it a public beta?

Ableton say they use this stage of the process to collect data on how you’re using the software and how stable it is. So, they are actively looking for bugs.

Back in the day, that meant you had to write extensive reports for developers to know what wasn’t working in the software. Now, a lot of that process is automated (though if you encounter some very specific bug, for instance with a particular third-party setup, you may want to write some report to Ableton).

Is it stable?

Okay, officially, it’s beta software, so strictly speaking it isn’t as stable as a finished release.

But Ableton betas are unique, in that certified trainers, some members of the press (hi there), Ableton employees, and some artists have been using Live 10 since the fall. I’ve probably opened Live 9 only a couple of times since September, and have played with Live 10 onstage and finished tracks in it.

Just be advised that any really essential files you’ll want to keep in Live 9; once you save as a Live 10 file, you can’t go back. And you can keep Live 9 and Live 10 installed side-by-side on the same machine. I’ve done that on both my Mac and PC and intend to leave it that way until Live 10 ships (and maybe a few months after).

Where can I find out what’s new?

Our monster guide covers pretty much everything:

Ableton Live 10 in depth: hands-on impressions, what’s new

Plus Tom Cosm has an extensive video walkthrough at the bottom of that post, and a handy, printable quick reference guide to shortcuts and new features – which is great for getting more productive in the refreshed Arrange view!

I’ll do an updated round-up of videos next week, and you can expect more guides in words (because reading is cool) around the release.

What’s up with Max?

Live 10 also includes the new version of Cycling ’74 Max/MSP, Max 8. Cycling haven’t revealed all of the new features in Max 8, and in particular what hard-core Max users will get from the authoring tool, but a pre-release version of Max 8 is shipping with Live 10 – meaning Ableton and Cycling ’74 are testing the new generation of each of their products at the same time.

That’s one small step in the direction we confirmed Ableton and Cycling intended to take as the two companies merged efforts:

Exclusive: Ableton acquires Max maker Cycling ’74; what you need to know

A conversation with David Zicarelli and Gerhard Behles

What’s the best feature that no one would immediately imagine is the best feature?

Drum Buss. (Search your feelings: you know it to be true.)

Enjoy the beta.

The post Ableton Live 10 now in public beta; here’s what you need to know appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Ableton Live 10 Now In Public Beta; Testers Needed

Ableton announced today that the newest version of their flagship product, Live 10, is now in public beta. The company seeks beta testers to help them “find and reproduce all unintended behavior” in the newest beta version of Live.… Read More Ableton Live 10 Now In Public Beta; Testers Needed