ableton

Ranging from Neurology to Prince, Susan Rogers’ talk is must-watch

The music world is overloaded with people who talk about music – how it works, what has happened, what is happening. Few people can really delve articulately into questions of why. Susan Rogers is one of those few.

Her talk at Ableton Loop this fall was, in all three years of attending Ableton’s bespoke event, the one that has stood out for me the most. I instantly nagged friends at Ableton to release the video, not only because I wanted people to see it, but because I wanted to watch it again just to process everything she said.

She talks about trying to understand Prince’s genius and how he worked. (She was sound engineer on Purple Rain and Sign o’ the Times.) She talks about how the brain works (she’s a neurologist) and why sometimes great music doesn’t find an audience. She talks in personal terms, and about how sometimes great people don’t find a partner. She does what I think great teachers do: she has something to say, and she gets to it directly. But there’s empathy in every insight, and each thought makes you feel a desire to go learn more – to do the homework.

I think whether we’re talking about machines or music or people, the further we go, the more we may realize understanding the mind is the key to all we want to investigate – of course.

I’ve got a lot more I’d want to talk to her about; I imagine you do, too. So – I’ll be rewatching as you rewatch, making notes.

The post Ranging from Neurology to Prince, Susan Rogers’ talk is must-watch appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

SoundSwitch Lighting Control System Now Supports Ableton Link

??SoundSwitch – a hardware + software system for controlling stage lighting – has been updated to support Ableton Link. … Read More SoundSwitch Lighting Control System Now Supports Ableton Link

Wirehead – Mulu

Published on Apr 12, 2018 Michael Elzer

“This is my first video on YouTube end even my first try to add pictures to one of my last songs called Mulu. Maybe a bit pointless, but atmospheric. Have fun!

Used Equipment:

Nord Lead 4 (Pads)
DSI REV2 („granular“ Pads and metallic Sequencing theme )
MOOG Sub37 (Saw Bass)
ELEKTRON Analog Four Mk II (moving Sequence)

NI Maschine Mk III (Main Beats and

Mattokind On Translating Your Music From Studio To Stage

Ableton shared this set of three videos, that take a look cinematic ambient artists Mattokind, and how they translate their music from studio to stage. The first video, above, captures Mattokind’s live performance of Scenescape. The next videos feature the group breaking down their setup and discussing their process for adapting their studio sound to… Read More Mattokind On Translating Your Music From Studio To Stage

become the sofa (80 min live set, minimoog, minitaur, ableton, monome)

Published on Apr 10, 2018 skinnerbox

download the set here:

Modular Synth Improvisation Live 041

Published on Apr 2, 2018

Music by Akihiko Matsumoto
http://akihikomatsumoto.com


(Modular System

Sequence: Ableton Live, Cycling’74 Max/MSP
Mix: Ableton Live
CV Converter: Korg SQ1, Expert Sleepers ES-3
Drums: Ableton
Synth1: Braids
Synth2: Plaits
Bass1: QUADNIC
Bass2: Black Wavetable VCO
Bass3: Warps with Black Wavetable VCO
Noise1: One
Noise2: Owl Modular
Noise3: Manis Iteritas
Noise4:

Learn how Tennyson translate between Ableton and percussion on kits

One of them likes to solve Rubik’s Cubes, blindfolded, on tour. The other is capable of executing elaborate drum programs programmed on a computer, on live percussion. Meet Tennyson and learn how they work.

As we saw before, Ableton Loop is a place not just for learning about a particular product for musicians, but gathering together ideas from the electronic music community as a whole. And Ableton have been sharing some of that work in an online minisite, so you get a free front row ticket to some of the event from wherever you are.

Tennyson is a good example of how explorations at Loop can cover playing technology as instrument – and everything that means for musicians. Watch:

Tennyson are a young Canadian brother and sister duo, with a unique musical idiom they tested together in live acoustic-electronic improvisations in jazz cafes. Complicated, angular rhythms flow effortlessly and gently, the line between kit and machine blurring. For Loop, they’re interviewed by Jesse Terry, who is product owner for Ableton Push (and has a long history working with the hardware that interacts with Live).

And the sample programming is insane: you get Runescape samples. A baby sneezing. The Mac volume control sound. It’s obsessive Internet-age programming – and then Tess plays this all as acoustic percussion and kit.

In this talk, they talk about jazz education, getting started as kids, Skype lessons. And then they get into the workings of a song.

The big trick here: the duo use Live’s Racks, using the Chain function, so that consistently mapped drum parts can cycle through different sounds as she plays. (I’ll review that technique in more detail soon.) 24 variable pads play all the sounds as Tess is playing.

Working with Chains in Ableton Live’s Device Racks can let you cycle through samples, patches, and layered/split instrument settings.

Part of why the video is interesting to watch is it’s really as much about how Tess has gradually learned how to memorize and recall these elaborate percussion parts. It’s a beautiful example of the human brain expanding to keep up with, then surpass, what the machine makes available.

For Luke’s part, there’s a monome [grid controller], keyboard triggers, and still more electronic pads. The monome loops chopped up samples, sticks can trigger more samples manually — it’s dense. He plays melodic parts both on keyboard and 4×4 pad grid.

The track makeup:

  • Arrangement view contains the song structure
  • A click track (obviously)
  • Software synths each have set lists of sounds, with clips triggering sound changes as MIDI program changes
  • The monome / mlrv sequencer

Here’s an (older) extended live set, so you can see more of how they play:

Here’s their dreamy, poppy latest music video (released March) – made all the more impressive when you realize they basically sound like this live:

More background on the band:

Welcome to the Magically Playful World of Tennyson [Red Bull Music]

New band of the week: Tennyson (No 14) [The Guardian]

Image courtesy the artists.

Check out a growing selection of content from Loop on Ableton’s minisite:

https://www.ableton.com/en/blog/loop/

Bonus: for a quick run-down on chains, here’s AfroDjMac:

The post Learn how Tennyson translate between Ableton and percussion on kits appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Loopmasters releases Blue Notes & Borrowed Chords for Ableton Live

Loopmasters Blue Notes and Borrowed Chords Ableton Chord RackLoopmasters has launched an exclusive Ableton Live MIDI effect rack that has been specifically designed for producers hunting that perfect chord sequence. The Blue Notes & Borrowed Chords instrument rack loads straight into your Ableton Live session and features fully mapped macros to change chord sets, add random note velocity, change the root note and […]

Free ‘Analog Voices’ Sound Library For Ableton Live, Bitwig Studio

Sensel has releases a free sample library for Ableton Live and Bitwig Studio, Analog Voices.… Read More Free ‘Analog Voices’ Sound Library For Ableton Live, Bitwig Studio

THEPHONOLOOP releases Cassette Vibraphone + 20% OFF in Spring Sale

Thephonoloop Cassette Vibraphone featTHEPHONOLOOP has announced Cassette Vibraphone, a multi-format instrument library featuring the sounds of a vibraphone. Cassette Vibraphone is the first instrument in cassette series recorded with real round-robin samples – every note in every dynamic layer was recorded 4 times, on top of that Kontakt version still has the option to turn on the simulated […]