Behringer bringt einen TB303-Clone – ist er womöglich schon „fertig“?

Behringer TB303Behringer TB303

Da postet Behringer auf deren Facebook Account ein Video, und neben der RD909 steht eine 303 …

Robert Winterhoff ist Chef von Behringer und Bugera, der Amp-Company. Es gibt ein Video, in dem scheinbar wenig Neues zu sehen ist, außer dass es „ihn“ jetzt gibt. Aber zufällig steht eine RD909 (TR909-Clone) neben ihm und dahinter sieht man eine TB303 in silber – aber offenbar mit etwas anderem Design.

Könnte es nicht sein, dass das ein Hinweis ist?

Es gibt ein paar Mäuse, die das denken, und Behringer hat immer etwas Wahrheit und Neues in ihren Beiträgen, sei es ein Bild oder ein Video.

Preise und Veröffentlichungstermin ist nicht bekannt, man kann aber für die NAMM auf mehr spekulieren.

Mehr Information

Behringer Facebook Profil.

Video

The Stylophone goes totally luxe with the GEN R-8

You’ve seen the Stylophone as the mass-produced, toy-like original. And you’ve seen it as a relaunched digital emulation and as an analog instrument. Now get ready for the Stylophone as premium boutique instrument.

The Stylophone began its story back in 1967, and became one of the iconic electronic musical inventions of the 20th century – its appeal being largely to do with its simplicity and directness. The son of the original inventor, Ben Jarvis, went on to revive instrument under the original manufacturer name, Dubreq.

Now, the GEN R-8 is here with some advanced features and flowery description about British circuitry you might expect from the ad copy for a high-end mixing desk. There’s something a bit funny about associating that with the instrument so long known as a (very musical) toy, but – think of the GEN R-8 as a new desktop synth, the full-featured, grown-up monster child of the original.

Oh, and — it sounds like it’s going to be a total bass beast.

So you know in campy horror movies where someone gets hit with a growth ray or radiation or whatever, and turns into a city-smashing giant? Hopefully this is like that, in a good way.

Sound specs:

Dual analog oscillators (VCOs) and full analog signal path.
Divide-down sub-oscillators (one octave lower) and subsub oscillators (two octaves lower) – switch them all on, and you get six oscillators at once.
12 dB state variable filter – low pass, high pass, band pass, wide notch – which they say is their own proprietary design.
ADSR envelope, now with a “punchy” shorter hold stage when you crank attack and decay peaks, they say.

There’s a delay, too – based on the Princeton pt2399 chip, and “grungy” in the creators’ description – which you can modulate via time CV input.

And some classic overdrive, plus an extra booster stage – this part does actually sound a bit like classic British console gear.

And there’s a step sequencer – 8 banks, 16 steps per sequence, both for the internal synth and external gear (CV/gate and MIDI output).

Plus the whole thing is patchable:
There’s an LFO with eight waveforms and dual outputs, which you can patch to all of the CV ins or to other gear.
The patch panel has 19 minijack CV/gate and audio patch points.

The keyboard is now touch-based – so you don’t need a stylus – and has a sort of absurd set of features (MIDI controller output with local on/off, glide and modulation keys, three octaves of keys).

And it’s made of steel.

Price: £299 / $349 / €329
Availability: Late February 2019 [limited edition]

So it’s really Stylophone on steroids – fully patchable, with delay and drive and filter, MIDI and CV, ready to use as a new synth or as a controller tool with other gear (other semi-modulars, Eurorack, MIDI instruments, whatever). It does appear one of the more interesting new instruments of the year – one to watch.

Demo:

https://dubreq.com/genr8/

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Analoger Poly-Synthesizer als Effekt für akustische Instrumente (und mehr)

Glou Glou MoutardeGlou Glou Moutarde

Das Konzept ist ungewöhnlich und ist wohl erst nach dem großen Analog-Boom möglich geworden. Ein Gerät, das man hinter Gitarre oder Bass schalten kann – der Glou Glou Moutarde stellt Filter und Modulation bereit. Egal, ob Saiten oder andere Signale, es fügt Synthesizer-Effekte hinzu.

Eigentlich erinnert das an die Effekte von Snazzy, die eine ganze Serie solcher Effekte anbieten (speziell „Tracer City“), die wirklich abgefahren sind. Dort wie hier sind es analoge Elemente. Hier im Glou Glou Moutarde sind es aber ganz klar vier Filter mit Modulation durch einen LFO und den Envelope Follower, der sich das Eingangssignal anhört und abhängig davon die Filter animiert. Sie haben jeweils eine eigene Resonanz und „Cutoff“-Justage und liegen quasi auf dem Signal auf als Klangerweiterung und weniger als reine Filterung.

Ich höre Stimmen

Bis zu 6 Stimmen dieser Art kann man hinzufügen und bewusst begrenzen und eher etwas hinzufügen als etwas wegzuschneiden. Demzufolge klingt es auch eher, als würde man entsprechend mehrstimmig dazu auf einem analogen Synthesizer dazu spielen, als dass der Klang nur einfach dunkler würde. Die Filter wabern umher und da es derer vier sind, bilden sie auch eine Art eigene Decke aus Sound. Die „Stimmung“ der vier Filter innerhalb der jeweiligen Stimmen erzeugt auch seltsame Intervalle, wenn man das wünscht.

Mehr Information

Glou Glou hat eine Website auf der man mehr erfahren kann. Der Preis ist mit 520€ angegeben, es gibt direkt dort einen Shop.

Videos

KORG volca modular and volca drum are real – and now we’ve got details

Some things are too good, or too improbable, to be true. Apparently that doesn’t apply to KORG’s volca series. Because if the ultra-compact, affordable modular and drum were exactly what you wished for, well – they’re here.

These will look familiar, because images of the top panels of these two pieces of kit hit the Internet in December. The funny thing was, a lot of people responded with “oh there’s no way that modular could be real.” Guess again.

The newest volcas are a modeled drum/percussion unit and a compact modular with tiny header pins for patching.

volca drum

This isn’t the volca series’ first take on percussion. It’s had a full drum machine with analog circuitry (volca beats), a bass drum synth piece built around the classic MS-20 filter (volca kick), and a digital sampling machine (volca sample).

But volca drum could turn out to be the most interesting yet, if they’ve nailed its sound source. volca drum is a percussion synth, with diffeent DSP-based models for sounds.

The WAVE GUIDE controls in the middle are the most interesting. And of course, having KORG’s sequencer with motion controls attached to a parameterized percussion synth seems really tasty – as with the volca kick, this could be interesting for all kinds of different parts, not just the obvious ones. But we’ll have to wait to hear more about it.

KORG for their part promise “standard percussive sounds” and “eccentric drum styles.”

Price: US$169.99

Availability: early 2019

volca modular

The volca drum has been so far overshadowed, though, by the curiosity of the volca modular.

There are eight independent functional modules in this unit. They’re pre-wired for patchless operation, but you can also reconfigure them with a whopping 50 patch points. Tiny jumper wires are included for connecting to the onboard pins. The volca modular is like a tiny toybox of sound design – a Buchla Easel for cash strapped millennials. (Okay, all of us older folks, too.)

Okay, but then – is it a modular? Well, even KORG cautiously dub it “semi-modular,” but while there’s no clear line, I’d say even modular is a reasonable term. While modular is now taken by some to mean something with interchangeable modules, especially in this age of Eurorack, I’d say anything with discrete functional modules that be interconnected in different ways ought to qualify.

And yeah, while this will work without patching, so too did the ARP 2500, and no one called that semi-modular.

Enough of semantics, though: it’s cool, as you’ll see in today’s hands-on review from Francis Preve.

The price is a little higher for a volca, but … no matter. This is a spectacular amount of modular patching in a single unit, and I think it’ll be really popular.

Price: US$199.99

Availability: early 2019

Side note: KORG are hardly the first to suggest this kind of modular patching. Phillip Stearns and Peter Edwards envisioned a modular system you’d build entirely on a breadboard – hyper-modular, if you will:

Edwards went to work for Bastl Instruments, who not coincidentally employed these jumper wires on their own instruments (like Kastle).

And if you feel volca modular isn’t quite what you’d want in a volca modular – like you’d rather have interchangeable, separate modules – that’s been done, too, in the form of the AE Modular Synth:

But the volca modular is unique in focusing on West Coast style synths – an oscillator source you make more complex with modulation and wavefolding, and which even gets fed into Buchla-style modules like the LPG (low pass gate).

And let’s be clear: it’s also unique and cool. Hope I get to play with one, too, soon.

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KORG’s minilogue xd is a new 4-voice synth with the best of the rest

KORG are introducing the Minilogue xd. It’s not just a Minilogue with some extras: it’s a new polysynth with the best bits of all the KORG analog range, including the prologue flagship, in a compact package.

It’s like the hatchback of synths – the compact, mid-range priced synth that might just wind up being everyone’s favorite. It’s poised to be the Golf GTI of electronic instruments.

It’s in the compact monologue form factor, with a US$649.99 price. And it’s coming soon (this winter, so… at least “before spring”).

To be honest, I loved the original of this series, the minilogue. But then with each new iteration, KORG added something new that made me want a combination of all the other synths.

And now, sure enough, what do we get? A combination of all the other synths.

From the minilogue: the elegant 4-voice polyphonic voice structure and voice modes that made the original so terrific.

From the monologue: the 16-step sequencer and microtuning features (thanks Aphex Twin!), plus that cute little form factor.

From the prologue: the MULTIdigital oscillator, plus new effects.

I’m sure some people will gripe because they wanted the extra keys and size of the minilogue, but otherwise this looks like the perfect KORG synth.

Reverb, delay, and modulation, plus two CV IN jacks complete the package.

Hilariously that “XD” of course also signifies “lol,” which may be how you feel if you just sold off a monologue or minilogue and now can buy up a combination of the two. (As with Windows XP, KORG are using the lowercase xd to de-emphasize that a little…)

Sing along:

Obligatory! Demo! Video!

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FamilyTool expands Moog, other semi-modulars with more patching

Moog’s DFAM and Mother-32 have attracted their own dedicated following. Now a Kickstarter project aims to expand patching flexibility on the Moog and other semi-modulars – so you won’t outgrow them.

There are two product ideas in the FamilyTool line. One is a unit for adding multis and splits, which extends patching on semi-modulars like the Mother-32. (There’s no multi, which would let you duplicate a signal.) A second product is a case with internal power for making a little “baby” modular – without having to make the leap into Eurorack. (The latter could get more expensive and means more to lug around. Arturia also recently showed small cases with this idea.)

The product looks really nice, and gets hand-assembled in Munich. One interesting twist: they say they’re only marketing this on Kickstarter, so there won’t be any units for sale after that.

Specs:

The MULT-OR-SWITCH is all about giving you more patching flexibility for more elaborate patches.

MULT-OR-SWITCH Module

6 A/B switches for up to six switchable routings
2 of which are OR-logic mixers
No external power source needed*
Passive MULT (1:4 or 2×1:2)
Patching fun with 24 I/Os

And the case is perfect for, say, a DFAM owner who wishes they also had just the awesome Mutable Instruments Clouds to play with (which, seriously, is possible):

powered UNCPROP Case

Fits eurorack modules up to 20hp and 35mm depth (e.g. Clouds and MATHS)
Perfectly fits DFAM/Mother-32 and
Is a great addition to any other semi-modular synth
For heavy users & beginners
internal PSU
works as a 20hp standalone eurorack case/effects unit
Handcrafted wooden panels (walnut)

Pricing starts at EUR199 depending on which round you’re in.

Maybe the coolest option: you can spring for a workshop and dinner with the makers in Munich.

Or you can get a scarf, which sounds appealing to me.

FamilyTool – a versatile modular synthesizer extension

Previously:

Arturia’s new easy, affordable modular cases also mount to MiniBrute 2

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Neuer geheimnisvoller Synthesizer mit Sequencer von Analogue Solutions – groß und analog …

Analogue Solutions ProtoAnalogue Solutions Proto

Analogue Solutions haben schon einige große analoge Synthesizer gebaut und darin sowie in einem neuen Sequencer auch ein neuartiges Sequencer-Live-Begleitungs-Prinzip eingebaut. Vielleicht geht diese Idee einen Schritt weiter?

Tom Carpenter ist wieder aktiv und fleißig. Es gibt eine fertige Platine, Gehäuse und Bedienfeld. Nur die Beschriftung fehlt noch. Das Gerät scheint soweit fertig zu sein und ist auf dem Stand eines Prototypen. Wir können nun eher raten was der  Analogue Solutions Prototyp tut.

Was ist es?

Zunächst fällt auf, dass es eine Reihe von 15 Buchsen gibt. Unten gibt es zwei Reihen von 8 durchsichtigen und damit sicher von innen beleuchteten Potiachsen, die vermutlich zu einem Sequencer gehören. Da es nur zwei Taster gibt, ist anzunehmen, dass Start und Stop sowie das Tempo ganz oben zu finden sind. Die Anordnung der Potigruppen in der Mitte und links könnten jeweils Oszillatoren (2-3 links) sein. Rechts könnten Filter und Hüllkurven sein, die in etwa die Struktur eines Minimoog haben könnten.

Analogue Solutions Prototyp – Das Konzept

Alternativ könnte es auch Teil eines Sequencer-Konzepts sein, was aber eher nicht in dieser Form angeboten würde. Da das Gehäuse als Pult gut funktionieren könnte, aber die Fusebox bereits so eine Form hat, muss man wohl die Buchsenreihe als „unten“ betrachten. Somit dreht sich die Funktion evtl. und der Sequencer-Teil befindet sich normalerweise oben – dann wären es eher zwei Oszillatoren.

Die beiden Reihen von je 4 Potis könnten zum Sequencer gehören oder aber ADSR-Hüllkurvengeneratoren darstellen, die jeweils für Lautstärke und Filter zur Verfügung stehen. Da es eher und maximal ein semimodulares Konzept sein kann, hat man dann Zugriff auf die wichtigsten Elemente in der Struktur – oder aber oder auch und auch den Sequencer. Alternativ könnte dieser nur intern genutzt werden und gar keine Signale nach außen geben.

Mehr dazu

Aktuell gibt es weder Preis noch Typ noch Tipps, um was es sich wirklich handelt, somit also auch noch keine näheren Informationen. Sicher aber wird irgendwann etwas auf der Webpage von Analogue Solutions auftauchen.

Synth pioneer Alan R. Pearlman, founder of ARP, has died

One of the great names in synthesis, founder of a brand that helped define what electronic sound is today, was lost over the weekend. ARP Instruments founder Alan R. Pearlman died Sunday the 6th, and synthesists worldwide remember the legacy he leaves.

Pearlman started ARP and was a principle engineer, specifically of the ground-breaking 2500 and 2600 modular synthesizers.

It may be hard to conceive now, but there was a time when ARP and Moog were major rivals. And it’s worth noting that Pearlman was uniquely advanced in his vision. Even as an engineering student in 1948, he looked forward to a time not so far off “when the electronic instrument may take its place … as a versatile, powerful, and expressive instrument” – provided those engineers paid attention “to the needs of the musician.”

And so in 1977, when Close Encounters of the Third Kind imagined an instrument that was far enough advanced to communicate with aliens, they chose the ARP 2500 that was Pearlman’s first commercial instrument. And Close Encounters were far from alone, as even the Martian voices were ARP 2500 produced in Jeff Wayne’s Musical Version of The War of the Worlds.

Other notable 2500 instrumentalists: David Bowie, Jean Michel Jarre, The Who… and Eliane Radigue:

The 2600 was itself legendary enough to be fairly dubbed a holy grail.

And speaking of space aliens, the one Doctor Who variant that matches Delia Derbyshire’s haunting whoo-whoo sounds with some sparkles and badass bass is also made on an ARP (the Odyssey), by Peter Howell:

And while the Rhodes Chroma originated at ARP was hardly a huge success, it is in many ways a template for the computer-integrated workstation-style instruments to follow.

Remembering Alan:

Richard Boulanger notes the unique musicality of this engineer’s vision and the impact it had – and that leading right up to his illness, he kept dreaming up new instrumental ideas:

.Yes, even at 90 and beyond, Alan R Pearlman was still dreaming of new circuits, modules, and controllers!) Undeniably, Alan R Pearlman was an engineering genius. Everyone recognizes that his synthesizers were beyond brilliant. But I truly believe that the heart and soul in his machines drew their spirit and life from Alan’s musical virtuosity on the piano, his truly deep musical knowledge, his passion and enthusiasm for “all” music, and his nurturing and generous support for young composers and performers, regardless of whether they were into classical, avantgarde, film, fusion, rock or pop. He wanted to make something that we could play with, that we could play on, and maybe even learn about music as we played (check out his “Learning Music Through Synthesizers” book and his MSL boxes). Alan R Pearlman created truly playable electronic musical “instruments”. He made aesthetically and ergonomically beautiful instruments, and beautiful sounding instruments. His synthesizers opened our eyes and ears to new sonic worlds

NAMM has an oral history interview

He recalls first seeing the Buchla, and the impact of Moog’s controller approach. The company was named with his nickname (and initials ) – ARP. And arguably ARP’s approach to matrix switching (ARP 2500) and hard-wired control even with patch cord access (ARP 2600) is still valuable today.

Just how modern can the ARP designs be? That was proven when KORG revived the Odyssey recently, with some input from Pearlman, along with a collaboration with ARP co-founder David Friend.

And while we think of Moog and Buchla, ARP also significantly contributed to a lot of the technological innovations of the modern synth, as evidenced by this list of ARP patents (thanks to Synthtopia for spotting that):

http://www.till.com/articles/arp/patents.html

Various ARP owners have been posting tributes:

And have long sung the magic of these instruments – here’s Marc Doty, giving the instrument extrahuman autonomy:

Surviving daughter Dina Pearlman shared the news yesterday:

ARP employee Rick Parent shares his remembrances, along with ARP’s David A. Frederick:

David Mash remembers:

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Bastl’s Dark Matter module unleashes the joys of feedback

What would a module behave like if it were built entirely around feedback – say, like one of those “zero-input” all-feedback mixer performances? Bastl Instruments teams up again with Peter Edwards to answer that question. The result: Dark Matter.

Dark Matter lets you add feedback to any signal, whether you want to use that as a bit of color, create rhythmic effects, or go completely wild. And since it is designed with the inspiration of zero-input mixer technique in mind, you can also use it as a signal source – a kind of feedback oscillator. Feedback by definition is about signal routing; Dark Matter runs with that idea and create an instrument around patching and shaping feedback in a modular environment.

It’s a new collaboration between Bastl and Peter Edwards, following their softPop instrument (and Peter’s own long-running Casper Electronics).

There are different kinds of overdrive. You can add sub-octave tones and other colors. There’s a built-in 2-band EQ (so highs and lows get separate control) – and that has overdrive, too.

On the rhythmic side, there’s a built-in envelope follower for ducking and gating and the like.

And there’s tons and tons of I/O and CV control, so this really was designed with a modular environment in mind. (That’s important – there are a number of Eurorack modules that seem like desktop tools that sort of got plunked into a modular case without much forethought; this isn’t that.)

But before we talk specs, creator Peter Edwards – himself an experimental musician as well as inventor – has some philosophical and spiritual things to say about feedback. Those are in the manual too, but let me highlight this passage. We’re “going deeper and deeper into the void” – gotta love those Czech winters, right? (Now turn in your hymnals now to “We Sing Praises of the Dark Shadows of Feedback.”)

So here’s what it all comes down to, the resonating soul of the amplifier and the recklessly over amplified external audio signal battling it out in the feedback thunderdome…

This is why I like to think of audio feedback as sort of the negative space around a sound, like a sonic shadow. A dark counterpart.

Feedback is wonderful. It’s the living, breathing, unpredictable, organic side of electrical sound. That’s not even just to say in the analog domain; as long as you steer clear of digital clipping, feedback has powerful potential in digital, too. It’s one of the reasons to use a modular environment in the first place, whether hardware or software. So I hope in addition to looking at Dark Matter, we dig into this topic generally. (I was just playing with feedback loops in VCV Rack, thanks to some tips from Kent Williams aka Chaircrusher.)

Embrace the darkness, and dive into the void of feedback.

Uh… oh yeah, tech specs.

FEATURES:
-Input VCA with gain and soft clipping
-2 band equaliser with voltage controlled bass and treble boost/overdrive
-Voltage controlled feedback
-External feedback section for making and fine tuning loops through other modules
-Voltage controlled crossfade between input and feedback signals
-Input tracking envelope follower for adding ducking and gating effects
-10 I/O jacks for adding CV and making crazy loops

TECHNICAL DETAILS:
– 13 HP
– PTC fuse and diode protected 10-pin power connector
– 24 mm deep
– power consumption +12V: < 75mA; -12V: <75 mA

More details and online ordering available on Bastl’s Website:

https://www.bastl-instruments.com/modular/dark-matter/

265 EUR excl. TAX from Bastl’s own noise.kitchen and select retailers, available now.

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Dreadbox Hypnosis: teaser for a dreamy synthwave effects box

From the mint-and-hot-pink labels to the wobbly pitch and effects, make no mistake: Dreadbox are teasing their upcoming Hypnosis with retro synthwave fetishists in mind. And from the sound, we’re okay with that.

In a surprise bit of pre-Christmas marketing, synth and effects maker Dreadbox have revealed this look at their next hardware:

And while it’s a “teaser,” they’re pretty much giving away the plot. Hypnosis is three effects units in one (you bring your own synth to the party):

1. Analog spring reverb, complete with a 3-spring tank and “unique pitch modulation circuit”
2. Stereo delay: analog Bucket Brigade Delay (BBD) for retro delay effects
3. Chorus-flanger with three different waveforms for modulation

It’s a trifecta, Neapolitan ice cream of effects – the three tastiest flavors in one. (Now I have to think about which flavor is chocolate, vanilla, and strawberry in this metaphor.)

And maybe Dreadbox just won the winter NAMM show before it even started. Let’s wait and see.

I mean, the synthwave party sort of happened a while ago, but then … chorus-flanger, delay, reverb, analog, none of these things ever really goes out of style. Waiting on price, want one anyway.

https://www.dreadbox-fx.com/

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