Eerie, amazing sounds from tape loops, patches – like whales in space

Fahmi Mursyid from Indonesia has been creating oceans of wondrously sculpted sounds on netlabels for the past years. Be sure to watch these magical constructions on nothing but Walkman tape loops with effects pedals and VCV Rack patches – immense sonic drones from minimal materials.

Fahmi hails from Bandung, in West Java, Indonesia. While places like Yogyakarta have hogged the attention traditionally (back even to pre-colonial gamelan kingdom heydeys), it seems like Bandung has quietly become a haven for experimentalists.

He also makes gorgeous artworks and photography, which I’ve added here to visualize his work further. Via:

http://ideologikal.weebly.com/

This dude and his friends are absurdly prolific. But you can be ambitious and snap up the whole discography for about twelve bucks on Bandcamp. It’s all quality stuff, so you could load it up on a USB key and have music when you’re away from the Internet ranging from glitchy edges to gorgeous ambient chill.

Watching the YouTube videos gives you a feeling for the materiality of what you’re hearing – a kind of visual kinetic pcture to go with the sound sculpture. Here are some favorites of mine:

Via Bandcamp, he’s just shared this modded Walkman looping away. DSP, plug-in makers: here’s some serious nonlinearity to inspire you. Trippy, whalesong-in-wormhole stuff:

The quote added to YouTube from Steve Reich fits:

“the process of composition but rather pieces of music that are, literally, processes. The distinctive thing about musical processes is that they determine all the note-to-note (sound-to-sound) details and the overall form simultaneously. (Think of a round or infinite canon.)”

He’s been gradually building a technique around tapes.

But there’s an analog to this kind of process, working physically, and working virtually with unexpected, partially unstable modular creations. Working with the free and open source software modular platform VCV Rack, he’s created some wild ambient constructions:

Or the two together:

Eno and Reich pepper the cultural references, but there are aesthetic cues from Indonesia, too, I think (and no reason not to tear down those colonial divisions between the two spheres). Here’s a reinterpretation of Balinese culture of the 1940s, which gives you some texture of that background and also his own aesthetic slant on the music of his native country:

Check out the releases, too. These can get angular and percussive:

— or become expansive soundscapes, as here in collaboration with Sofia Gozali:

— or become deep, physical journeys, as with Jazlyn Melody (really love this one):

Here’s a wonderful live performance:

I got hooked on Fahmi’s music before, and … honestly, far from playing favorites, I find I keep accidentally running over it through aliases and different links and enjoying it over and over again. (While I was just in Indonesia for Nusasonic, it wasn’t the trip that made me discover the music – it was the work of musicians like Fahmi that were the reason we all found ourselves on the other side of the world in the first place, to be more accurate. They discovered new sounds, and us.) So previously:

The vaporwave Windows 98 startup sound remix no one asked for

http://ideologikal.weebly.com/

https://ideologikal.bandcamp.com/

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Two acid-y, space-y, terrific live electronic sets for your Friday

A great live set brews up new musical directions before your ears. It’s a burst of creativity and energy that’s distinct from what happens alone in a studio, with layers of process. From Liverpool (Madeline T Hall) and Moscow (Nikita Zabelin x Xandr.vasiliev), here are two fine examples to take you into the weekend.

Acid-tinged synths unfold over this brilliant half hour from M T Hall (pictured, top), at a party hosted earlier this year by HMT Liverpool x Cartier 4 Everyone:

I love that this set feels so organic and colors outside the lines, without ever losing forward drive or focus. It organically morphs from timbre to timbre, genre to genre. So just when it seems like it’s just going to be a straight-ahead acid set (that’s not actually a 303, by the way, it seems), it proceeds to perpetually surprise.

I think people are afraid to create contrast in live sets, but each shift here feels intentioned and confident, and so the result is – you won’t mistake this for someone else’s set.

Check out her artist site; she’s got a wildly diverse set of creative endeavors, including immersive drawing and sound performances, and work as an artist covering sculpture, sound, video and installation. (Madeleine, if you’re reading this, hope we can feature your work in more depth! I just can’t wait to release this particular set first!)

http://the-royal-standard.com/artists/madeline-hall/

And more music:

Darker (well, and redder, thanks to the lighting), but related in its free-flowing machine explorations, we’ve got another set from Moscow from this month:

It’s the project of Nikita Zabelin x Xandr.vasiliev, at Moscow’s Pluton club, a repurposed factory building giving a suitably raw industrial setting.

This is connected for me, though. Dark as it is, the duo isn’t overly serious – weird and whimsical sounds still bubble out of the shadows. And it shows that grooves and free-form sections can intermix successfully. I got to play after this duo in St. Petersburg and you really do get the sense of open improvisation.

Facing off at Moscow’s Pluton.

xandr aka Alexander has a bunch more here:

That inspires me for the coming days. Have a good weekend, everybody.

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Ectomorph, legendary Detroit duo of nerdy techno, finally get their 2xLP

BMG and Erika, playing together as Ectomorph, are about to do a full double LP album release on Halloween. And what you get is a magnum opus of weird, improvisational madness with machines. It’s about time – for Ectomorph, and for techno.

The teaser alone should make you excited: Doctor Who on acid on Halloween on Detroit:

Mmmm, sweet 303 and Moog, you can still sound futuristic in the right hands.

Here’s the thing: any moderately successful genre will get sucked at regular intervals into an industry that wants to polish it up and make it predictable and repeatable. And so you need people routinely shaking up that predictability. In the case of Ectomorph, that’s keeping experimentalism alive by hauling a whole mess of gear to gigs and getting a little strange. Erika and BMG are both formidable on their own at this. Put them together, and it’s like hitching two locomotives to the front of the train.

Interdimensional Transmissions, their label, is likewise good at channeling sounds both spacey and groovy and bits in between.

So, it’s all remarkable that Ectomorph, born in 1994, hasn’t really gotten a full-length outing. Let’s presumably blame the challenge of how to make a live act a record. The act actually was the launch release for Interdimensional Transmissions back in 1995, but by design, limited itself to Detroit-only 12″ vinyl. Now, it gets a wide release, just at the moment when the techno world needs a little less Instagram fashion brands and a little more, you know, people getting freaky with machines because it’s damned “techno,” not “sportswear catalog.” Oops, was I ranting? Sorry.

Now, how do you capture a live act’s immediacy, but make it work pressing to vinyl? For Stalker, that formula is one that has always driven great techno records – something like this:

1. Find that truly perfect groove setup.
2. Hit record.
3. Don’t do more takes. (Everything here is reportedly one or two takes.)

I can talk to these two artists a little more about that. But there’s something of the essence of techno in this approach, and it’s tough to overstate. Look, there’s nothing wrong with tracks that get worked over or micro-edited or whatever. (Yes, I’m an IDM person. And OCD. And enjoy long hours in the studio turning raw materials into something completely different.) But the roots of techno as genre have more to do with that “hit record on some groove on some machines that gets your ass shaking” than any particular superficial features of the musical outcome.

The press will make a big deal about the gear itself, because that’s something a non-musician can see by looking at the table at a gig. But I think it doesn’t matter if the groove comes from a cobbled-together pattern in FL Studio and an ElecTribe. What may well matter is that “hit record on a groove that’s working perfectly and then don’t mess with it.”

In any event, these really are perfect grooves. (I’ve heard the full length version, too, and this is definitely a top 2018 release.)

I think it’s also fair to expect this to be a highlight of Amsterdam Dance Event (ADE), where weirdo-friendly groovy techno is pushing its way into the spotlight in an event known more for overstuffed European industry scenery. The Bunker had their outing here in Amsterdam yesterday with No Way Back party figures like Derek Plasaiko and Bryan Kasenic, and you get Ectomorph, aligned with Berlin stalwart Tresor, on Saturday, along with other fine techno improvisers. (Midwest techno’s flag is flying with the likes of Noncompliant Saturday, too.) Sounds good to me.

Previously:

Regarding No Way Back parties:

In a documentary film, a return to Detroit and speaker f***ing

Erika:

We Travel The Space Ways: Hear Erika’s Stellar, Synth-y, Space-y Solo Debut [Listen, Video]

And again:

Here are some space-y solar Moog sounds by Erika

And it’s Thursday, I know, but:

This extended techno mix will get you through any Wednesday

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Free pack of sounds from the Polish Radio Experimental Studio

Think of it as the BBC Radiophonic Workshop of the east: the Polish Radio Experimental Studio produced unparalleled electronic sounds and inventions for decades. Recognition of those accomplishments is growing – and now Ableton are collaborating to produce a free pack of sounds and tell the PRES story.

Vital stats on this project:

Who’s behind this: Poland’s national cultural institution Instytut Adama Mickiewicza (IAM) commissioned the library from Ableton and contributors.

Where do the sounds come from: Works made at the studio by composers Krzysztof Knittel, Elżbieta Sikora, and Ryszard Szeremeta, 1970s-80s, comprise the original sound material.

Who built the pack: Project coordinator Michal Mendyk worked with Ableton Certified Trainer Marcin Staniszewski.

What’s in there: 300 sounds, loops, and effects organized into Drum Racks, plus custom Effect Racks, all pre-mapped with macros (making them easy to use with Push or other controllers)

Check out the pack and a full article on the studio and its history at Ableton’s site (plus more on Marcin Staniszewski and his music):

Sounds from the Polish Radio Experimental Studio

Lots more links there, but the history to me is the most compelling. Paralleling the hot-and-cold relationships of experimental sound and music technology in East Germany and the Soviet Union in the same period, there was a precarious relationship of electronic sound to the government in Communist Poland. Michal Mendyk tells the story of studio founder Józef Patkowski to Ableton:

Paradoxically, a couple of years earlier, it was Sokorski who introduced social realism and radical political and aesthetical censorship in Polish art and culture. He was famous for having said about Witold Lutosławski, one of the leaders of Polish music vanguard that “he should be thrown under a tram”. So, in 1957 the same guy was responsible for creating the most experimental music centre in the whole Eastern Europe! He later said that Polish Radio Experimental Studio was his way to redeem his previous sins. This is one of many example of how paradoxical cultural and intellectual life in an authoritarian system can be.

Here’s a great documentary on the studio:

And for an imaginative take on the studio’s work, see our previous story:

The retro-futuristic Apparatum draws from Polish electronic music history

Plus more on the ongoing legacy in Poland:

This 1971 Dancing Rectangle from Poland Predicts Modern Techno, AV

Live techno after Polish punk and communism: Dyktando of Brutaż

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Watch enchanting experimental live acts from Atonal’s control room

Berlin Atonal Festival wrapped up last week, and for all of the breathtaking impact of the power plant’s cavernous main room, as per usual, the sleeper hits came from the more intimate control room tucked next to the mainstage.

Once you’re done acting out your Homer Simpson fantasies on the controls, this room – staffed by the synthesis lovers of Schneidersladen – is home to more experimental acts and jam sessions and modular patching extravaganzas. And the crowd is different, too, more family style sound nerd reunion than festival scenesters.

Photo at top: Mark Verbos, modular builder, alongside Lady Starlight. Photo courtesy CTM Festival.

Our friends from FACT captured three performances. (Don’t watch on Facebook; that social network’s encoding is crap for some reason. YouTube seems fine.)

There were lots of great shows, but they also selected well with what they recorded, with two gorgeous ambient solo sets and one quirkier duo. (Also, anyone else noticed that laptops have just quietly reappeared alongside modulars? And why not – who cares what particular gear you’ve assembled, if you find some way to be expressive with it?)

There are some dropouts here and there, but it’s worth checking out anyway.

My favorite is object blue – all on Ableton Live/Push, but a kind of shuffled, irregular looping musique concrete:

London-based artist object blue has a bunch of great stuff in her discography:

https://objectblue.format.com/

Really digging this one, just out this year:

But then this is lovely, too, adding more vocal goodness, also a 2018 creation:

Hiro Kone (aka NYC’s Nicky Mao) is looking chill with her Elektrons and modulars, and with good reason – some chill sounds happening. Lounging in the control room, genau:

Nicky is one busy, multi-talented, insanely prolific touring musician. And she’s got a well-organized site to discover more of her music (we would all do well to learn from that, too… rarity these days):

https://hirokone.com/

She’s done a nice mix for Secret Thirteen recently too:

https://secretthirteen.org/stm-246-hiro-kone/

KILLER-OMA is the off-kilter, leftfield (and inter-generational) combo of Isao Suzuki and KILLER-BONG – yes, one bare chin on gear, and one long beard on contra bass.

More from them:

Check out their release on Bandcamp for Tokyo’s Black Smoker:

https://blacksmokerrecords.bandcamp.com/album/killer-oma

Mixed feelings about the live stream age, actually – and something to think about, as CDM revisits how to work with live performing friends. (I’d go for higher quality audio, no? Thoughts?) At the same time, a live stream is a nice place to introduce people, and it’s great to see what people are doing – if we can sort those occasional sound dropouts. Open to ideas for what you’d like to see, especially as a community of music makers.

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Immerse yourself in Rotterdam’s sonic voltages, in the WORM laboratory

It’s dubbed a “Waveform Research Centre” – and Rotterdam’s gear-stuffed WORM laboratory is a science fiction playground for voltages, making music and visuals alike. Let’s go inside.

Dennis Verschoor is a mainstay of the Rotterdam experimental electronic scene, with some decades of artist experience to his name and the legendary Noodlebar performance series. Filmmaker Steve Guy Hellier joins Thonk’s Steve Grimley-Taylor to produce a short film about him and this amazing space: (thanks, Sonic State, hat tip)

From the description:

I first met Dennis whilst I was in the WORM studio on an artist residency in 2017. The WORM studio is like a geological trip through electronic music’s history but I was about to travel even further back. Strange ghostly tones emanated from the old vocal booth next door, it was this space that Dennis had filled with mid 20th century audio test equipment, going back to the roots of audio electronic experiments before commercially available instruments from Moog or Roland, before keyboards, back to Stockhausen, Else Marie Pade, Daphne Oram, Raymond Scott and the like. Why now? is this the logical conclusion of Mark Fisher’s cultural hauntology? do we end up back at the source? the sound of past futures? For Dennis it seemed more a way to dodge the hipsters, and invite collaboration.

Dennis and I had a friend in common Steve Grimley-Taylor, a lover of all things electronic and sound related (founder of Thonk.co.uk). When I expressed the idea of making a film about Dennis, Richard Foster from WORM kindly agreed to let us. This is a short film about Dennis, his journey and his room.

Steve Guy Hellier 2018

You know what time it is, kids? It’s gear pr0n, time. Some waveform pics to get your Friday night started right.

WORM Rotterdam is also a great all-encompassing event venue.

The WRC has its own Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/Waveform-Research-Centre-1157781711025359/

Information on the Sound Studio:

https://worm.org/spaces/sound-studio/

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From Japan, an ambient musician on solitude and views of the sea

As haunting, oceanic wells of sound sing achingly in the background, Tokyo-based ambient musician Chihei Hatakeyama talks in a new documentary about what inspires him.

The creative series toco toco follows the musician to the places and views that inspired the images of his music – including gazing into the sea. Of that view, he says:

“There wasn’t any gap in space, it was translating directly into music.”

Filmmaker Anne Ferrero writes to share her work, as she follows the artist “to the roots of his universe, in the Kamakura and Enoshima areas, where he grew up.”

And he speaks of the beauty in ambient music, and its connection to nature. And while solitude in computer music is often seen as something of a liability, here he talks about its importance – as he uses that laptop as a box for editing improvisations.

Being able to create music alone made it more personal. The music that I wanted to make could now express my mind – what I felt inside.

The film is subtitled in English, with Japanese audio. (Don’t forget to turn CC on.)

It’s a deeply personal film all over, and even talks about the journey from electronic sounds on dancefloors to the quieter, more contemplative world of ambient music. And he finds that moment of liberating himself from the beat – not by trying to copy what people would call ambient music on a superficial level, but by fumbling his way to this solution after eliminating obstacles to expression.

Hey, I love both modes of music, myself, so I can appreciate that balance. It’s just rained here in Berlin, and I’m reminded of that feeling of relief when it rains after long periods of sun … and visa versa. Maybe music is the same way.

Have a watch, and I’m sure you’ll want to pick up a guitar or laptop, or go to a beach, or take a personal field trip to the museum and stare at paintings.

Painting with colors in sound … filling the world with oceans of your own expression. What could be more lovely?

Now, an insane amount of beautiful music:

http://www.chihei.org

https://www.discogs.com/artist/440866-Chihei-Hatakeyama

https://chiheihatakeyama.bandcamp.com

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Moving AV architectures of sine waves: Zeno van den Broek

Dutch-born, Danish-based audiovisual artist Zeno van den Broek continues to enchant with his immersive, minimalistic constructions. We talk to him about how his work clicks.

Zeno had a richly entrancing audiovisual release with our Establishment label in late 2016, Shift Symm. But he’s been prolific in his work for AV sound, with structures made of vector lines in sight and raw, chest rattling sine waves. It’s abstract an intellectual in the sense of there’s always a clear sense of form and intent – but it’s also visceral, both for the eyes and ears, as these mechanisms are set into motion, overlapping and interacting. They tug you into another world.

Zeno is joining a lineup of artists around our Establishment label tonight in Berlin – come round if you see this in time and happen to be in town with us.

But wherever you are, we want to share his work and the way he thinks about it.

CDM: So you’ve relocated from the Netherlands to Copenhagen – what’s that location like for you now, as an artist or individually?

Zeno: Yes, I’ve been living there for little over two years now; it’s been a very interesting shift both personally and workwise. Copenhagen is a very pleasant city to live in – it’s so spacious, green and calm. For my work, it took some more time to feel at home, since it’s structured quite differently from Holland, and interdisciplinary work isn’t as common as in Amsterdam or Berlin. I’ve recently joined a composers’ society, which is a totally new thing to me, so I’m very curious to see where this will lead in the future. Living in such a tranquil environment has enabled me to focus my work and to dive deeper into the concepts behind my work, it feels like a good and healthy base to explore the world from, like being in Berlin these days!

Working with these raw elements, I wonder how you go about conceiving the composition. Is there some experimentation process, adjustment? Do you stand back from it and work on it at all?

Well, it all starts from the concepts. I’ve been adapting the ‘conceptual art’ practise more and more, by using the ideas as the ‘engine’ that creates the work.

For Paranon, this concept came to life out of the desire to deepen my knowledge of sine waves and interference, which always play a role in my art but often more in an instinctive way. Before I created a single tone of Paranon I did more research on this subject and discovered the need for a structural element in time: the canon, which turned out to a very interesting method for structuring sine wave developments and to create patterns of interference that emerge from the shifting repetitions.

Based on this research, I composed canon structures for various parameters of my sine wave generators, such as frequency deviation and phase shifting, and movements of visual elements, such as lines and grids. After reworking the composition into Ableton, I pressed play and experienced the outcome. It doesn’t make sense to me to do adjustments or experiment with the outcome of the piece because all decisions have a reason, related to the concept. To me, those reasons are more important than if something sounds pleasant.

If I want to make changes, I have to go back to the concept, and see where my translation from concept to sound or image can be interpreted differently.

There’s such a strong synesthetic element to how you merge audio and visual in all your works. Do you imagine visuals as you’re working with the sound? What do they look like?

I try to avoid creating an image based on the sound. To me, both senses and media are equally important, so I treat them equally in my methods, going from concept to creation. Because I work with fundamental elements in both the visuals and the sound — such as sine waves, lines, grids, and pulses — they create strong relationships and new, often unexpected, results appear from the merging of the elements.

Can you tell us a bit about your process – and I think this has changed – in terms of how you’re constructing your sonic and visual materials?

Yes, that’s true; I’ve been changing my tools to better match my methods. Because of my background in architecture, drawing was always the foundation of my work — to form structures and concepts, but also to create the visual elements. My audiovisual work Shift Symm was still mainly built up out of animated vector drawings in combination with generative elements.

But I’ve been working on moving to more algorithmic methods, because the connection to the concepts feels more natural and it gives more freedom, not being limited by my drawing ability and going almost directly from concept to algorithm to result. So I’ve been incorporating more and more Max in my Ableton sets, and I started using [Derivative] TouchDesigner for the visuals. So Paranon was completely generated in TouchDesigner.

You’ve also been playing out live a lot more. What’s evolving as you perform these works?

Live performances are really important to me, because I love the feeling of having to perform a piece on exactly that time and place, with all the tension of being able to f*** it up — the uncompromising and unforgiving nature of a performance. This tension, in combination with being able to shape the work to the acoustics of the venue, make a performance into something much bigger than I can rationally explain. It means that in order to achieve this I have to really perform it live: I always give myself the freedom to shape the path a performance takes, to time various phrases and transitions and to be able to adjust many parameters of the piece. This does give a certain friction with the more rational algorithmic foundation of the work but I believe this friction is exactly what makes a live performance worthwhile.

So on our release of yours Shift Symm, we got to play a little bit with distribution methods – which, while I don’t know if that was a huge business breakthrough, was interesting at least in changing the relationship to the listener. Where are you currently deploying your artwork; what’s the significance of these different gallery / performance / club contexts for you?

Yes our Shift Symm release was my first ‘digital only’ audiovisual release; this new form has given me many opportunities in the realm of film festivals, where it has been screened and performed worldwide. I enjoy showing my work at these film festivals because of the more equal approach to the sound and image and the more focused attention of the audience. But I also enjoy performing in a club context a lot, because of the energy and the possibilities to work outside the ‘black box’, to explore and incorporate the architecture of the venues in my work.

It strikes me that minimalism in art or sound isn’t what it once was. Obviously, minimal art has its own history. And I got to talk to Carsten Nicolai and Olaf Bender at SONAR a couple years back about the genesis of their work in the DDR – why it was a way of escaping images containing propaganda. What does it mean to you to focus on raw and abstract materials now, as an artist working in this moment? Is there something different about that sensibility – aesthetically, historically, technologically – because of what you’ve been through?

I think my love for the minimal aesthetics come from when I worked as an architect in programs like Autocad — the beautiful minimalistic world of the black screen, with the thin monochromatic lines representing spaces and physical structures. And, of course, there is a strong historic relation between conceptual art and minimalism with artists like Sol LeWitt.

But to me, it most strongly relates to what I want to evoke in the person experiencing my work: I’m not looking to offer a way to escape reality or to give an immersive blanket of atmosphere with a certain ambiance. I’m aiming to ‘activate’ by creating a very abstract but coherent world. It’s one in which expectations are being created, but also distorted the next moment — perspectives shift and the audience only has these fundamental elements to relate to which don’t have a predefined connotation but evoke questions, moments of surprise, and some insights into the conceptual foundation of the work. The reviews and responses I’m getting on a quite ‘rational’ and ‘objective’ piece like Paranon are surprisingly emotional and subjective, the abstract and minimalistic world of sound and images seemingly opens up and activates while keeping enough space for personal interpretation.

What will be your technical setup in Berlin tonight; how will you work?

For my Paranon performance in Berlin, I’ll work with custom-programmed sine wave generators in [Cycling ’74] Max, of which the canon structures are composed in Ableton Live. These structures are receive messages via OSC and audio signal is sent to TouchDesigner for the visuals. On stage, I’m working with various parameters of the sound and image that control fundamental elements of which the slightest alteration have a big impact in the whole process.

Any works upcoming next?

Besides performing and screening my audiovisual pieces such as Paranon and Hysteresis, I’m working on two big projects.

One is an ongoing concert series in the Old Church of Amsterdam, where the installation Anastasis by Giorgio Andreotta Calò filters all the natural light in the church into a deep red. In June, I’ve performed a first piece in the church, where I composed a short piece for organ and church bells and re-amplified this in the church with the process made famous by Alvin Lucier’s “I’m sitting in a room” — slowly forming the organ and bells to the resonant frequencies of the church. In August, this will get a continuation in a collaboration with B.J. Nilsen, expanding on the resonant frequencies and getting deeper into the surface of the bells.

The other project is a collaboration with Robin Koek named Raumklang: with this project, we aim to create immaterial sound sculptures that are based on the acoustic characteristics of the location they will be presented in. Currently, we are developing the technical system to realize this, based on spatial tracking and choreographies of recording. In the last months, we’ve done residencies at V2 in Rotterdam and STEIM in Amsterdam and we’re aiming to present a first prototype in September.

Thanks, Zeno! Really looking forward to tonight!

If you missed Shift Symm on Establishment, here’s your chance:

And tonight in Berlin, at ACUD:

Debashis Sinha / Jemma Woolmore / Zeno van den Broek / Marsch

http://zenovandenbroek.com

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オルゴールのような形をした小型シンセBivalvia Synthesis

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スウェーデンのLove Hultén氏がデザインしたBivalvia Synthesisは木製のケースを使ったAxolotiベースのハードウェアシンセサイザーです。Bivalviaとはハマグリのような2枚貝を意味するようですが、それを聞いただけでも詩的な雰囲気が漂います。

ふたを開くと中には6つのダイヤル式ノブ(またはフェーダー)、旧型のコンピュータキーボードのようなCherryキースイッチが15個並んでいます。このスイッチで12のMIDIノートを演奏したり、オクターブのアップ・ダウンシフトを行うことができます。さらには15wのスピーカーを内蔵。Axolotiのパッチソフトウェアを使いサウンドやエフェクトを作ったり、内蔵SDカードを経由してパッチのトランスファーができるとのこと。

Axolotiは独自にシンセパラメーターをデザインできるMax/MSPのようなソフトウェアで、Axoloti Coreと連動することによってスタンドアローンのハードウェアシンセを設計できるものです。プログラミングのテクとアイデアさえあればこんな可愛いハードウェアシンセを作れてしまうんです。

Bivalvia Synthesisのサウンドは下のビデオで聞くことができます。

 

 

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LOVE HULTEN

 

Get lost in a Dasha Rush ambience, with hypnotic visuals to match

With all that sound out there, you’d better make your musical statement a strong one. And why not add the kinds of visuals we see when we shut our eyes and listen?

This winter, visualist future error went into the archives of Resident Advisor and pulled out an evocative, dreamy ambient mix by Dasha Rush. Known best for her pounding techno, Dasha is also a producer and purveyor of more experimental music, too. And the combination of trippy monochromatic geometries and textures with this mix is reason enough to kick back on the couch with your iPad or TV or projector or whatever and … chill. (You deserve it!)

RA source, with an interview and track listing:
RA.469 Dasha Rush – An ambient odyssey

Alongside the expected Donato Dozzy, Biosphere, Alva Noto, Monolake, Brian Eno (and Dino Sabatini, with whom Dasha often plays) … there are a couple of rare cuts in there, too.

Moscow’s Mendeleev, for one, you might want to check out:
https://www.facebook.com/mendeleevmusic/

And don’t miss Grzegorz Bojanek, whose music I got to know through Dasha – he’s an electroacoustic musician, a Polish netlabel hero, and a staple of how the ambient/experimental scene is evolving in that country (including producing the Warsaw Electronic Festival – yes, it’s not just Unsound Festival in Poland, folks):

Grzegorz Bojanek at Bandcamp

Grzegorz is worth visiting elsewhere on this site, too, so stay tuned.

While we’re digging into the archives, here’s Dasha playing ambient music live (since the RA mix is a DJ set):

Or, for another AV experience, here’s the music video from her collaboration with Lars Hemmerling, “LOSTBAHNHOF,” which hums and taps along into a nicely weird groove:

And, hey, if you’re going to use Facebook, here’s one pleasant way to do it:

https://www.facebook.com/pg/dasha.rush.music/

If this sort of thing is your taste, you’ll like Dasha’s label, as well:

https://fullpandarecords.bandcamp.com/

Thanks as always, Dasha!

And yeah, we have done this once before:

Voyage into Dasha Rush’s inspiring ambient sonic worlds

The post Get lost in a Dasha Rush ambience, with hypnotic visuals to match appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.