Noise generator: a chat with Uchi, as LA celebrates electronic sound

Miami-born Uchi is a fresh face as LA collective BL_K NOISE meet up with Berlin’s Raster – and that’s a perfect time to catch up with her and reflect.

Dive in, commit. It’s that moment when the mixer fader is up and you start your live set, the let’s-screw-up-our-lives risk-taking bigger moments we make sometimes for musical passion. It’s the willingness to screw up live and screw up life, maybe.

That sums up why a lot of us are here as well as anything. And so that makes Uchi’s approach refreshing. Just as your email promo inbox is full of drab, sound-alike techno and washes of disinterested distorted ambience, Uchi kind of doesn’t follow any rules. Her DJ sets are diverse and daring, her live sets going deep and abstract and back again. And she talks to us a bit here about that abandon.

It’s also paying off. Uchi has gone from being known in Miami to becoming a regular at Berlin’s most sought-after slots – including Berghain’s upstairs Panorama Bar and its darker, weirder new ground floor Säule. But the best part is, I think we don’t know quite what she’ll do next. There’s a couple of EPs, a full-length album, and various podcasts coming and … well, the hell with predictability. The artists you want to watch are the ones that will surprise you.

January is definitely when we celebrate new music gear, thanks to Anaheim, California’s massive NAMM convention show. But then why not celebrate new noises, too? BLK_NOISE has assembled for Saturday a party made up of artists willing to push their electronic instruments until they hurt. From team USA, you’ve got Richard Devine, Surachai. From Germany, label Raster – the imprint formerly known as Raster Noton – Grischa Lichtenberger, and label co-founder Byetone. (Carsten Nicolai aka Raster Noton is going solo again, reverting his label to Noton.) And then there’s secretive BLK_NOISE anchor Belief Defect, who have feet in both Berlin and LA.

And then there’s Uchi. Let’s get a soundtrack: here’s a CDM exclusive debut, off her upcoming EP. Ingredients: KORG ElecTribe ER-1 [synth], Moog Minifooger [MF] Delay, Eventide Space reverb and “rat distortion.” (I think she means Pro Co RAT, but — this is New York, so…. it could have been, like, an actual rat.)

PK: What’s the set you’re preparing for LA? I loved this noise set that just streamed from Halcyon [in New York].

Uchi: I don’t know what happened there! It’s so weird! I have the recording of it myself; I gotta hear it and see!

I think for this show I’m going to use somewhat similar setup I’ve been using for most noise shows these days, a narrow selection of stuff, and complete improvisation — or zero preliminary sequencing. It’s the first time I’ll try an AV setup, which is exciting!

It seems like you’ve had some pretty significant shifts in your life, your musical direction … especially as some of the folks who will be hearing you in LA as well as our readers may not know you yet, what’s the trajectory been from Miami to Berlin? How did you get where you are currently?

Yeah, I guess there’s been a lot of changes the last couple of years. I lived in Miami since age 10, up until college. After I finished a degree in Computer Science, I took DJing (obtained from radio hosting at University) more seriously, as well as actually working on something I used to do for fun — (Ableton fiddling) making music.

The Boiler Room set came about from Juan Del Valle, now a friend. His influence was to convince me to make a live set. That being said, it was my first live set ever, and it was on Boiler Room – lol! BUT it was a great way to learn how to use hardware! Then Berlin came after the release on Plangent Records, which made the first gig in Panorama Bar happen. That made me decide not to get a flight home, basically.

The interesting thing is that just before I left Miami, everything had already started changing. I was pretty active in the noise scene, which was a whole different level of exploration in music, the exact opposite of composition and programming or what I used to make the Boiler Room set. Noise changed also the way I record, too. It seems I find single takes, and master out mixes more interesting than spending hours on a single detail or mixing down. I guess trying to finish ideas in one day if the case has a lot of details, otherwise just simple pressing record (mistakes included) and room recordings.

I made the album and the last couple EPs basically playing them. Since moving to Europe, which changed literally everything about what I knew, and also playing for promoters in different cities, I’ve had the chance to do something different. Nowadays, I’m combining all influences together — noise improvisation, changing patterns, speed, writing melodies or lack thereof, depending on so many different things. For instance where, when, and for whom each show is prepared for, relative to time, and where things are for me at the moment — it’s never the same. I’m still figuring it out, but if there is something to expect, it should be to expect something new.

These Saüle appearances have been great … in this age and (city!) people can cling to a somewhat narrow and clasutrophobic view of genre, so that’s a relief. Can you talk a little bit about you’ve been playing lately?

Well, I guess Säule was a bit of the turning point. It made me realize its not far-fetched to combine everything into one presentation. Funny you say claustrophobic view of genre! That puts it a bit better in perspective actually. I think the first time was probably one of the most liberating DJ sets of my life, the first time I felt like myself. The struggle of genre has been real for a really long time, but thanks to that lately, I reeeally don’t care for dance floor “rules” too much, and follow just, whatever feels right at the time. I’m curious to what you would describe those gigs as.

Mmm, eclectic? This is why I wouldn’t really call myself a music journalist, just a musician. So to that — what are you using to play for this live set? Not just to sort of get gear-focused, but instead — what does this mean as far as instrumentation, as composition?

For sure, it will be a Moog Mother [Mother-32 synthesizer] running, pitching it sporadically, plus vocal whale sounds … maybe some screaming. Also some Koma Elektronik noises generated from the Field Kit [“electro-acoustic workstation”] and BD101 [analog gate-delay pedal] as main effects, messing with any signal sent to the aux [input] of the Field Kit.

I guess as “composition,” I suppose breaking it down by frequency – the vocal stuff is a lot of mid-range melodic, of course, with a ton of reverb and delay, the Moog for low-end and the Koma stuff for texture, high-pitch screeching, and pulsating static. These have been my favorite pieces of gear to use for noise shows. I made the last album using the Moog heavily, so it’s kind of been my main instrument for almost two years, along with Koma stuff which is heaven for noise freaks — the Moog sounds on another level! And some classic reverb and distortion pedals, Boss DS-1 [distortion pedal, since 1978] and Eventide Space.

What do those instruments mean to you; how do they impact how you play spontaneously?

They are my children!!! I supposed their user interface totally affects how they are played. For example, the large knobs of the Mother and the semi-modular part for patching and combining it with it with the BD10 light sensor (which kind of acts like a theremin), and putting that in the Field Kit mixer, which has got a life of its own. The signals kind of bounce with each other. Feed-backing is waaay fun. Also, the continuity of LFO’s makes it easy to do multiple things at once. Whatever instruments I’m using at the moment play a really large role in every live set, if not the biggest role. I hope to be switching to full-on modular this year! Wish me luck.

Thanks, Uchi!

If you’re in LA, check out the event! I wrote about Belief Defect’s live rig here and for Native Instruments; now it’s America’s turn to get that live. Co-hosted with Decibel Festival:

[BL__K NOISE]: Raster Label Showcase

https://www.facebook.com/uchpuch/

Photos courtesy the artist.

The post Noise generator: a chat with Uchi, as LA celebrates electronic sound appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

raster-noton’s elusive Grischa Lichtenberger on creative sound

Grischa Lichtenberger is working with felt and stencils as well as sound. He’s speaking in hyperlinks, and misusing gear and feeding computers into other computers to form feedback loops. In short, he’s finding a unique and creative materialism in everything he does – and that means we really have to talk to him. So we sent Zuzana Friday to join in a delightfully esoteric conversation with the raster-noton artist. -Ed.

Grischa Lichtenberger is a German musician and sound and installation artist, known for his releases on raster-noton. His immersive live performances oscillate between abrasive, aggressive compositions and intricate structures of beat and melody. Recently, he has released a new triple-EP ‘Spielraum | Allgegenwart | Strahlung’ on raster-noton as a limited-edition vinyl with hand-printed sleeves. The three EPs question the connection between intimacy and the public sphere, but each of them has layers of their own meaning.

I find myself uniquely moved by Grischa Lichtenberger’s work. It’s not only the choice of sounds, their combinations and permutations, but the sense of emotion behind them that strikes me. There’s also playfulness, even cheekiness at moments. Other times, I find beauty, or anxiety, or drama, or a language we’re only learning to understand.

The music is often very physical, with the beats collapsing like detonated structures. Silence and space will swell up, stagger — carve their way to your ears. Melody in turn hastily gushes in percussive patterns, breaks down in waves, or becomes narrative. Grischa does all of this on his new triple-EP consisting of three chapters. We tried to tackle all of them in over a hour long interview.

Grischa speaks in complex, branching sentences, navigating topics and poetic descriptions in a way that mirrors his own process for bringing together his thoughts on a work, whether for a music or an installation. We talked to him about his own work and process, including the triple-EP, but also ranged to topics like Joseph Beuys.

Friday: In ‘Allgegenwart’, you write about the ubiquity of technology and feelings of guilt and a threatening sense of over-complexity. Where do you see humans and technology going?

Grischa: We like to see technology as this tool that fulfills our desires. But of course there’s more and more consciousness about us being overly immersed in the virtual world. Then we have a problem not only with communicating in real life, but also on all these social platforms. Our relationship with them has changed from the early 2000s to now. At the beginning, you had this romantic idea of being able to reach out to people you would never reach. Nowadays, the approach is more cynical and more and more people feel overwhelmed. It’s a trouble that wasn’t there before.

Plus, regarding social platforms, people are concerned about their personal data being misused.

I’d say that the totalitarian discussion of the 20s Century has shifted to the … anonymous or virtual. It’s like an invisible totality.

The first part of your trilogy is called ‘Spielraum’. In the accompanying text, you describe the Spielraum with words like hope and experiment. Do you have your Spielraum, is it your studio?

Sure, the studio is like a playground, where you have things gathered like toys. And more than that, every home is still connected to when I was little and I’d build little shelters from cushions. It’s also about intimacy and what your … private intimate space is like.

If I consider Spielraum as a space where one can be free to play around, at the same time, how do you deal with distractions? Do you turn off your phone when entering the studio?

Through desirable factors. Most of the times, I have my phone on vibration and I don’t push mail and Facebook. But there isn’t a specific preparation in the studio to shut the world out. When I started making music, I used to have internet on one PC and the music and all artworks on another PC. But then the internet became a bigger part of my daily process and it actually can even be a part of the flow. If you have a loop running and you want to let it run for a while and quickly check what’s next with Trump or whatever and go back to the music, there’s no clear boundary that needs to be there for having that flow.

The Spielraum … can address some stuff that is invisible or unspeakable. In doing art, you have a secret space to do whatever you feel like doing, a track without a snare or any silly idea. Even now, when talking about it, it seems almost impossible to defend that idea. But if you just sit there and do the track, you have the feeling that you can try things out and you don’t have to write it down and prove [it].

The sounds of the triptych are very diverse. Which devices and instruments have you used for this record? And is there a difference in terms of used instruments and processes between the three parts of the album?

Yes, there is. For ‘Spielraum’, I used a lot of “incestuous” recording methods, so to speak. I recorded from one computer to another. I recorded with a lot of feedback systems, where one program feeds into the other and also outputs to the other.

For ‘Strahlung’, I used synthesizers more excessively that I used to. I didn’t grow up with them and I don’t really know much about them. I still don’t have any hardware synthesizers, mainly because I don’t have much clue about them and I don’t have a good ear to appreciate the analog quality, even though there is a special materiality to it. But I think all synthesizers have a specific sound, and software synthesizers are still very appealing to me. Also, I once wanted to make a record that could play in the background, which always failed for me [laughs]. So with ‘Strahlung’, I wanted to make one record which I could imagine playing in the living room. And it also corresponds with the idea of the invisible force.

r-n168-2 Artwork. Courtesy the label.

r-n168-2 Artwork. Courtesy the label.

From all three EPs, ‘Strahlung’ is definitely the most friendly; it has these nice melodies, for instance. Actually, the strongest impact on me was the closing track (r-n173 – 8 – 004_1115_26_lv_1_brecs) from ‘Strahlung’, probably because of the contradictory nature of its emotional and melancholic melody and abrasive, mechanical sounds piercing through. Do you remember how you made this track? What was your intention there?

I don’t remember exactly. But this track was actually meant to reconnect the listening circle of the record, its end and the beginning. So I imagined that a listener would listen to it and then start playing the first track of Spielraum again.

Apart from the digital synthesizers, what else have you used for the album — which software, for example?

I used Reason, including its Subtractor synthesizer, which is a really nice one, plus Ableton for most parts of the sequencing. I used [Celemony] Melodyne, for its nice algorithm, where you can manually slide through a polyphonic source without boundaries and divide the material in voices. Although it’s quite complex and I can’t get my head around it, it’s really fascinating.

For ‘Allgegenwart’, I used a noise suppressor. If you raise the level of a noise suppressor… you can just feed it with the background noise and it will generate a very eerie, ghostly sound, because it tries to find a tonal signal in it. It’s like a synthesizer which isn’t meant to be a synthesizer.

What are other ways for you to generate sound, do you use field recordings or sound banks?

I have an always-extending archive of sounds I use. I don’t use sound banks so much, only sometimes when I want to make a joke about a clap or something, and for instance I just use an 808 clap to have it as a symbolic reference. But normally, I like to live with sounds. I have an old track and many sounds in there, so I just put the track in the sampler, pull a bit out of there and … rework it over and over again. It’s kind of like a collage out of my own productions. I also use field recordings and synthesized sounds. I like this process where you go back to yourself and involve yourself in what you did, not only try to have the best kick drum of all times, but try to find out what the kick drum from 5 years ago means to you. Sometimes, you see ‘Oh, this is much nicer than anything I could have made up!’ and sometimes, you go, ‘what was I thinking? It’s trash!’

Photo: Sebastian Moitrot.

Photo: Sebastian Moitrot.

How do you decide which sounds will be composed together, since they range in timbre, texture, and character? How do you choose which sounds fit together in your musical universe?

It’s not accidental; I think about it very much, but I can’t tell any general method. When I have something I want to go on with, like a melody from a synth, then I listen to it and I think about what’s missing until it’s finished. Maybe it’s a bass drum – then I add it so it complements the rest, then I move on to another sound, add it and try if it all fits together.

It’s like painting for me. When you paint something new, you do it regarding what’s already in the painting. For me, the music making process is linear. Most of the time, when I do a track, I go forward, I add EQs, dynamics, plug-ins in massive chains, and I add sounds, and only in moments when I think about it and stop for a while, I can go back, re-evaluate, and correct. But in the creative flow, I tend to add and add, so the context is building itself organically and everything is connected to each other.

Your website resembles a body of work of an inventor with its precise sketches, complex descriptions, photographs and installations. Where do your ideas for installations come from?

Often, there is a room or a context that’s already there. Because mostly, I am approached to contribute to an exhibition or an event. Like this year, I did an installation for a conference about genomes. So at first I try to conceptualize, which means looking into my archive and finding a drawing, painting, or a ready-made object, which fits to the general idea or a context. Then I deal with the room, like I would deal with paintings or levels in a track. Then there are strategies about materials I use – I look into the constructions I have done in the past and look for what could I use for recycling the sculptural elements. Then, if it’s a construction, I make a drawing of how it’s going to be built together. It also depends on my time and resources. The result can be an intense reaction to the room or something spontaneous.

grischa_installation

In all my installations, there’s also a very strong reaction to works by Joseph Beuys, because my parents were his students, so I knew his work since I was a kid – I saw his piece ‘I like America and America Likes Me’ – where he imprisoned himself with a coyote in a gallery – when I was five years old. And because Beuys reached me so early in my life, I see him differently than most of the critics. It’s like music, I really liked it and felt the emotional content in there. So since I was 5, I thought ‘Doing art is really nice, you can have this sort of communication’. And when you’re so young, you still have this very present thin line of how language is built and you try to get through to people very clearly. You aren’t sure whether you understand people or whether they understand you. And you can perceive art and music like some sort of solution of this communication problem.

genographies_1

http://www.grischa-lichtenberger.com/installations/2015%20Genographies/

But the way I work with installations is not only homage to Beuys — it’s also a joke. Especially regarding the materials I use. For example, I use a sort of felt, which for Beuys was a mythical and poverty-stricken material. But he used a really high-quality felt. I use a material that looks the same, but it’s actually moving blankets, so they’re more industrial and cheap. I connected with this material because it was permanently laying around in my father workshop, so it’s more natural for me than felt. that felt. And besides this joke, what I also like about the material, is that it looks grey, but when you look closely, it’s actually super colorful, because it’s made of recycled plastic bags. I cling on to it, I know how it behaves, and I often use it for covering up wood constructions or making bigger spatial interventions. These things work like favorite pens or plug-ins.

genographies_2

You printed, stamped and signed all the 500 copies of a special edition of this triple-EP by yourself. Is this personal approach of creating a unique piece of art something you cherish?

When [raster-noton’s] Olaf [Bender] suggested to do this triple-EP and a limited edition, I was super happy, because I like vinyl and because I like having physical objects and not only a digital, ghostly trace. And I liked working on silkscreen very much, as well. I made the designs for the prints by hand and had a very nice day helping printing them. And as we layered the stencils a bit differently for each of the copies; each one is unique. It would be actually interesting to buy two of the vinyls to recognize the differences [laughs].

How would you like to push your work further in the future?

My future plan since I started with raster-noton is to find a way to [better] connect all the different aspects of art. I see that this is still a big difficulty for me, because I have all these ideas and accompanying texts. But many people despise these texts for being too long and overly complex. Of course, I have to learn how to write better, how to make music better or how to paint better, but I would also love to learn how to write better in relation to music and how to make music in relation to painting and have this all connected with one another.

It’s also important that the disciplines aren’t connected too much, because I often find refuge in one discipline when I’m sick of the other for the moment. But just for the communication, I would want different parts of my work to seem to be all more clearly coming from one particular person.

http://grischa-lichtenberger.com

Releases, artist info via raster-noton

The post raster-noton’s elusive Grischa Lichtenberger on creative sound appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Hear this Now: Shapednoise Does a Doom Mix And People are Listening

shapednoise

In the overabundant parade of mixes, you might easily grow weary of the sound-alike monotony of predictably-popular hits inserted back to back in a party-friendly groove.

This is not that.

The latest from Shapednoise is a mix for FACT that follows in a mold only in that it’s as violently depressing as you’d expect if you’d been following this artist. You know, depressing in a … stimulating way.

Shapednoise begins by dropping you out an airlock for a zero-gravity dance of archaic tribal rituals. And from there, things more or less descend into an angry, room-clearing procession of reverbs and distortion. This is the sound of alien machinery screaming a siren song as it dies, then finally entering a dizzying forward rhythm.

Now’s a reasonable time to be talking about Shapednoise, as the artist is starting 2015 on a roll. There was last year’s beautiful, terrifying record on Opal Tapes. CTM Festival has been championing his work in bookings outside of Berlin, and collaboration – with Mumdance and Logos, soon to be redubbed The Sprawl – was a real highlight for me. And on top of it, there’s his work on the label Repitch.

The next stop is Sonic Acts, in Amsterdam. The embarrassment of riches in Europe now – austerity be damned – is such that this isn’t even the only festival in Holland to watch. But nonetheless, you get yet another out-there gathering of sound and visuals from Emptyset to Shackleton to Florian Hecker, this time at Paradiso and the bathtub-of-art Stedelijk Museum. And I expect the Shapednoise collaboration with visualist sYn could be a highlight.

Metaphysical from Shapednoise on Vimeo.

The reason I make the mix the centerpiece is here is, this is the critical mass of stuff that has formed the planetoid of this music, and this mix is a pretty good guide, especially once you start Googling around the alien noises you’re hearing if you haven’t already discovered some of them.

Tracklist:

Neel -­ Phobos (Spectrum Spools)
Squarepusher vs Keith Fullerton Whitman ­Interview
The Stranger ­- Kirkbymoorside (History Always Favours the Winners)
TCF -­ F8 5E BB 63 94 B5 17 BA 74 AC 11 EE 33 86 B2 7E 93 E0 E4 AA B4 CF 1F 64 (Liberation Technologies)
Logos ­- Glass (Shapednoise Remix) (Different Circles)
Gondwana -­ Binaural Beats (Forthcoming on Opal Tapes)
Elizabethan Collar – 04 (Aught)
Oake – ­Vorwort: Umiha Sien (Downwards)
Imaginary Forces ­- Council Flat (Beduin Records)
The Body ­- Hail To Thee, Everlasting Pain (Rvng Intl.)
Samuel Kerridge -­ Paint It Black Reprise (Blueprint)
Skam – Sandy (Avian)
Damian Dubrovnik ­- Blue Mussels (Alter)
Akkord ­- HTH020 (The Haxan Cloak’s Cloud of Witness Remix)
AnD -­ Relic Radiation (Electric Deluxe)
Grischa Lichtenberger ­- 1011_27_#5b (Raster Noton)
James Hoff -­ Erblast (PAN)
Chris Petit -­ Museum Of Loneliness / Flickers (Test Centre)
Lakker ­- Untitled (Unreleased)
Hecker – Chimärisation (Editions Mego)
Shit and Shine – Who’s Your Waitress (Diagonal)

Shapednoise, Mumdance and Logos present: The Sprawl at CTM Festival last week.

Shapednoise, Mumdance and Logos present: The Sprawl at CTM Festival last week.

I thoroughly enjoy, though, the way he’s picked the dirtiest and scariest of these and managed to grind them into something yet more distorted, taking a bloodied knife and then stomping on it until it shatters into bits.

I’ll point out a few names. Grischa Lichtenberger is a molten young contributor to Raster Noton, taking them beyond the sounds most associated with that label. Lakker are techno veterans from Ireland who have turned to the dark side, sonically, in a lovely way. Samuel Kerridge has been making his Contort parties a shrine to this sort of sound, apart from his own unique offerings to the dark lords of electronic composition. And these labels (from Electric Deluxe to Editions Mego to PAN to Rvng) have clustered together, young and old, into a galaxy of outlets for adventurous sound; they’ve made this a movement.

The fact that these sounds have entered something approaching the mainstream demonstrates just how immune to weird sounds we’ve become. Hipsters can now comment knowingly on the subtleties of different dark reverb tails and pedal-driven destruction, because there’s no doubt this is music.

This stuff used to scare people. Now, it’s a party. Oddly, some people are complaining about that. I think it’s bloody brilliant.

Because maybe from there, we’re really liberated to use a full spectrum of sounds – even the ones that come from broken gear. (Yes, fine, I’ll say it – that was Aphex Twin just winning a Grammy. I don’t care if you hate Syro; it’s still a sign of the times.)

But I’ll be listening to this one. You know, when I want some cheery happy music…

https://www.facebook.com/Shapednoise

Full disclosure: I’ll be playing on a bill with Shapednoise on the first of March, as a duo with Lower Order Ethics (Szilvia Lednitsky) which we’re calling Alchemic Harm. (That is one of those infamous Contort parties, presented with Tresor/Ohm and Atonal Festival.) It’s just sort of nice convenience when artists I want to cover (aforementioned Lakker, Grischa) just show up on the handful of gigs I play. It’s a pleasure to get to make some noises alongside these boys and girls and contribute to the general mayhem.

Here are some other Shapednoise tracks I think are worth lending your ears (you, erm, may not get them back, though):

The post Hear this Now: Shapednoise Does a Doom Mix And People are Listening appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Hear this Now: Shapednoise Does a Doom Mix And People are Listening

shapednoise

In the overabundant parade of mixes, you might easily grow weary of the sound-alike monotony of predictably-popular hits inserted back to back in a party-friendly groove.

This is not that.

The latest from Shapednoise is a mix for FACT that follows in a mold only in that it’s as violently depressing as you’d expect if you’d been following this artist. You know, depressing in a … stimulating way.

Shapednoise begins by dropping you out an airlock for a zero-gravity dance of archaic tribal rituals. And from there, things more or less descend into an angry, room-clearing procession of reverbs and distortion. This is the sound of alien machinery screaming a siren song as it dies, then finally entering a dizzying forward rhythm.

Now’s a reasonable time to be talking about Shapednoise, as the artist is starting 2015 on a roll. There was last year’s beautiful, terrifying record on Opal Tapes. CTM Festival has been championing his work in bookings outside of Berlin, and collaboration – with Mumdance and Logos, soon to be redubbed The Sprawl – was a real highlight for me. And on top of it, there’s his work on the label Repitch.

The next stop is Sonic Acts, in Amsterdam. The embarrassment of riches in Europe now – austerity be damned – is such that this isn’t even the only festival in Holland to watch. But nonetheless, you get yet another out-there gathering of sound and visuals from Emptyset to Shackleton to Florian Hecker, this time at Paradiso and the bathtub-of-art Stedelijk Museum. And I expect the Shapednoise collaboration with visualist sYn could be a highlight.

Metaphysical from Shapednoise on Vimeo.

The reason I make the mix the centerpiece is here is, this is the critical mass of stuff that has formed the planetoid of this music, and this mix is a pretty good guide, especially once you start Googling around the alien noises you’re hearing if you haven’t already discovered some of them.

Tracklist:

Neel -­ Phobos (Spectrum Spools)
Squarepusher vs Keith Fullerton Whitman ­Interview
The Stranger ­- Kirkbymoorside (History Always Favours the Winners)
TCF -­ F8 5E BB 63 94 B5 17 BA 74 AC 11 EE 33 86 B2 7E 93 E0 E4 AA B4 CF 1F 64 (Liberation Technologies)
Logos ­- Glass (Shapednoise Remix) (Different Circles)
Gondwana -­ Binaural Beats (Forthcoming on Opal Tapes)
Elizabethan Collar – 04 (Aught)
Oake – ­Vorwort: Umiha Sien (Downwards)
Imaginary Forces ­- Council Flat (Beduin Records)
The Body ­- Hail To Thee, Everlasting Pain (Rvng Intl.)
Samuel Kerridge -­ Paint It Black Reprise (Blueprint)
Skam – Sandy (Avian)
Damian Dubrovnik ­- Blue Mussels (Alter)
Akkord ­- HTH020 (The Haxan Cloak’s Cloud of Witness Remix)
AnD -­ Relic Radiation (Electric Deluxe)
Grischa Lichtenberger ­- 1011_27_#5b (Raster Noton)
James Hoff -­ Erblast (PAN)
Chris Petit -­ Museum Of Loneliness / Flickers (Test Centre)
Lakker ­- Untitled (Unreleased)
Hecker – Chimärisation (Editions Mego)
Shit and Shine – Who’s Your Waitress (Diagonal)

Shapednoise, Mumdance and Logos present: The Sprawl at CTM Festival last week.

Shapednoise, Mumdance and Logos present: The Sprawl at CTM Festival last week.

I thoroughly enjoy, though, the way he’s picked the dirtiest and scariest of these and managed to grind them into something yet more distorted, taking a bloodied knife and then stomping on it until it shatters into bits.

I’ll point out a few names. Grischa Lichtenberger is a molten young contributor to Raster Noton, taking them beyond the sounds most associated with that label. Lakker are techno veterans from Ireland who have turned to the dark side, sonically, in a lovely way. Samuel Kerridge has been making his Contort parties a shrine to this sort of sound, apart from his own unique offerings to the dark lords of electronic composition. And these labels (from Electric Deluxe to Editions Mego to PAN to Rvng) have clustered together, young and old, into a galaxy of outlets for adventurous sound; they’ve made this a movement.

The fact that these sounds have entered something approaching the mainstream demonstrates just how immune to weird sounds we’ve become. Hipsters can now comment knowingly on the subtleties of different dark reverb tails and pedal-driven destruction, because there’s no doubt this is music.

This stuff used to scare people. Now, it’s a party. Oddly, some people are complaining about that. I think it’s bloody brilliant.

Because maybe from there, we’re really liberated to use a full spectrum of sounds – even the ones that come from broken gear. (Yes, fine, I’ll say it – that was Aphex Twin just winning a Grammy. I don’t care if you hate Syro; it’s still a sign of the times.)

But I’ll be listening to this one. You know, when I want some cheery happy music…

https://www.facebook.com/Shapednoise

Full disclosure: I’ll be playing on a bill with Shapednoise on the first of March, as a duo with Lower Order Ethics (Szilvia Lednitsky) which we’re calling Alchemic Harm. (That is one of those infamous Contort parties, presented with Tresor/Ohm and Atonal Festival.) It’s just sort of nice convenience when artists I want to cover (aforementioned Lakker, Grischa) just show up on the handful of gigs I play. It’s a pleasure to get to make some noises alongside these boys and girls and contribute to the general mayhem.

Here are some other Shapednoise tracks I think are worth lending your ears (you, erm, may not get them back, though):

The post Hear this Now: Shapednoise Does a Doom Mix And People are Listening appeared first on Create Digital Music.