Neumann intros NDH 20 studio headphone and KH 750 DSP subwoofer at NAMM

Neumann NDH 20 feat

Neumann.Berlin has announced its first headphone at the NAMM Show in Anaheim. The Neumann NDH 20 is a closed-back studio headphone combining excellent isolation with the carefully balanced sound image and outstanding resolution you would expect from a Neumann product. The NDH 20 is ideally suited to monitoring, editing and mixing tasks, even in loud […]

The post Neumann intros NDH 20 studio headphone and KH 750 DSP subwoofer at NAMM appeared first on rekkerd.org.

Sony showcases PCM-D10 and PCM-A10 hi-res audio recorders at Winter NAMM 2019

Sony PCM-D10

At Winter NAMM 2019, from January 24-27 in Anaheim, CA, Sony will be showcasing the latest audio technologies in booth #10720 including hi-res microphones, recorders, wireless receivers and transmitters, headphones, and audio enhanced video camera setups. New to the booth are Sony’s latest professional hi-res recorders, PCM-D10 and PCM-A10, ideal for live music recording, podcasting, […]

The post Sony showcases PCM-D10 and PCM-A10 hi-res audio recorders at Winter NAMM 2019 appeared first on rekkerd.org.

Pioneer DJ intros HDJ-X10C limited-edition carbon fibre version of flagship DJ headphones

Pioneer HDJ-X10C

Pioneer DJ has announced the HDJ-X10C, a premium version of its over-ear flagship DJ headphones which will be globally released in limited quantities from 17th January 2019. The new model features enhancements to the design of the popular HDJ-X10, which offers outstanding audio quality, lasting durability and flexible functionality for professional DJs. Special materials used […]

The post Pioneer DJ intros HDJ-X10C limited-edition carbon fibre version of flagship DJ headphones appeared first on rekkerd.org.

Mackie celebrates 30 years running at NAMM 2018

Mackie 30 years running

Mackie has announces 30 years since they made its mark on the pro audio industry and are celebrating all its incredible customers that have made it possible. Mackie’s history is full of breakthrough products which have gone on to create and define a number of new categories like the LM-1602 that was originally shown at […]

The post Mackie celebrates 30 years running at NAMM 2018 appeared first on rekkerd.org.

Your questions answered: Sonarworks Reference calibration tools

If getting your headphones and studio monitors calibrated sounds like a good New Years’ Resolution, we’ve got you covered. Some good questions came up in our last story on Sonarworks Reference, the automated calibration tool, so we’ve gotten answers for you.

First, if you’re just joining us, Sonarworks Reference is a tool for automatically calibrating your studio listening environment and headphones so that the sound you hear is as uncolored as possible – more consistent with the source material. Here’s our previous write-up, produced in cooperation with Sonarworks:

What it’s like calibrating headphones and monitors with Sonarworks tools

CDM is partnering with Sonarworks to help users better understand how to use the tool to their benefit. And so that means in part answering some questions with Sonarworks engineers. If you’re interested in the product, there’s also a special bundle discount on now: you get the True-Fi mobile app for calibration on your mobile device, free with a Sonarworks Studio Edition purchase (usually US$79):

https://try.sonarworks.com/christmasspecial/

Readers have been sending in questions, so I’ll answer as many as I can as accurately as possible.

Does it work?

Oh yeah, this one is easy. I found it instantly easier to mix both on headphones and sitting in the studio, in that you hear far more consistency from one listening environment / device to another, and in that you get a clearer sense of the mix. It feels a little bit like how I feel when I clean my eyeglasses. You’re removing stuff that’s in the way. That’s my own personal experience, anyway; I linked some full reviews and comparisons with other products in the original story. But my sense in general is that automated calibration has become a fact of life for production and live situations. It doesn’t eliminate the role of human experts, not by a long shot – but then color calibration in graphics didn’t get rid of the need for designers and people who know how to operate the printing press, either. It’s just a tool.

Does it work when outside of the sweet spot in the studio?

This is a harder question, actually, but anecdotally, yeah, I still left it on. You’re calibrating for the sweet spot in your studio, so from a calibration perspective, yeah, you do want to sit in that location when monitoring – just as you always would. But a lot of what Sonarworks Reference is doing is about frequency response as much as space, I found it was still useful to leave the calibration on even when wandering around my studio space. It’s not as though the calibration suddenly stops working when you move around. You only notice the calibration stops working if you have the wrong calibration profile selected or you make the mistake of bouncing audio with it left on (oops). But that’s of course exactly what you’d expect to happen.

What about Linux support?

Linux is officially unsupported, but you can easily calibrate on Windows (or Mac) and then use the calibration profile on Linux. It’s a 64-bit Linux-native VST, in beta form.

If you run the plug-in the handy plug-in host Carla, you can calibrate any source you like (via JACK). So this is really great – it means you can have calibrated results while working with SuperCollider or Bitwig Studio on Linux, for example.

This is beta only so I’m really keen to hear results. Do let us know, as I suspect if a bunch of CDM readers start trying the Linux build, there will be added incentive for Sonarworks to expand Linux support. And we have seen some commercial vendors from the Mac/Windows side (Pianoteq, Bitwig, Renoise, etc.) start to toy with support of this OS.

If you want to try this out, go check the Facebook group:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/1751390588461118/

(Direct compiled VST download link is available here, though that may change later.)

What’s up with latency?

You get a choice of either more accuracy and higher latency, or lower accuracy and lower latency. So if you need real-time responsiveness, you can prioritize low latency performance – and in that mode, you basically won’t notice the plug-in is on at all in my experience. Or if you aren’t working live / tracking live, and don’t mind adding latency, you can prioritize accuracy.

Sonarworks clarifies for us:

Reference 4 line-up has two different *filter* modes – zero latency and linear phase. Zero latency filter adds, like the name states, zero latency, whereas linear phase mode really depends on sample-rate but typically adds about 20ms of latency. These numbers hold true in plugin form. Systemwide, however, has the variable of driver introduced latency which is set on top of the filter latency (zero for Zero latency and approx 20ms for linear phase mode) so the numbers for actual Systemwide latency can vary depending on CPU load, hardware specs etc. Sometimes on MacOS, latency can get up to very high numbers which we are investigating at the moment.

What about loudness? Will this work in post production, for instance?

Some of you are obviously concerned about loudness as you work on projects where that’s important. Here’s an explanation from Sonarworks:

So what we do in terms of loudness as a dynamic range character is – nothing. What we do apply is overall volume reduction to account for the highest peak in correction to avoid potential clipping of output signal. This being said, you can turn the feature off and have full 0dBFS volume coming out of our software, controlled by either physical or virtual volume control.

Which headphones are supported?

There’s a big range of headphones with calibration profiles included with Sonarworks Reference. Right now, I’ve got that folder open, and here’s what you get at the moment:

AIAIAI TMA-1

AKG K72, K77, K121, K141 MKII, K240, K240 MKII, K271 MKII, K550 MKII, K553 Pro, K612 Pro, K701, K702, K712 Pro, K812, Q701

Apple AirPods

Audeze KCD-2, LCD-X

Audio-Technica ATH-M20x, M30x, M40x, M50x, M70x, MSR7, R70x

Beats EP, Mixr, Pro, Solo2, Solo3 wireless, Studio (2nd generation), X Average

Beyerdynamic Custom One Pro, DT 150, DT 250 80 Ohm, DT 770 Pro (80 Ohm, 32 Ohm PPRO, 80 Ohm Pro, 250 Ohm Pro), DT 990 Pro 250 Ohm, DT 1770 Pro, DT 1990 Pro (analytical + balanced), T 1

Blue Lola, Mo-Fi (o/On+)

Bose QuietComfort 25, 35, 35 II, SoundLink II

Bowers & Wilkins P7 Wireless

Extreme Isolation EX-25, EX-29

Focal Clear Professional, Clear, Listen Professional, Spirit Professional

Fostex TH900 mk2, TX-X00

Grado SR60e, SR80e

HiFiMan HE400i

HyperX Cloud II

JBL Everest Elite 700

Koss Porta Pro Classic

KRK KNS 6400, 8400

Marshall Major II, Monitor

Master & Dynamic MH40

Meze 99, 99 NEO

Oppo PM-3

Philips Fidelio X2HR, SHP9500

Phonen SMB-02

Pioneer HDJ-500

Plantronics BackBeat Pro 2

PreSonus HD 7

Samson SR850

Sennheiser HD, HD 25 (&0 Ohm, Light), HD-25-C II, HD 201, HD 202, HD 205, HD 206, HD 215-II, HD 280 Pro (incl. new facelift version), HD 380 Pro, HD 518, HD 598, HD 598 C, HD 600, HD 650, HD 660 , HD 700, HD 800, HD 800 S, Moometum On-Ear Wireless, PX 100-II

Shure SE215, SRH440, SRH840, SRH940, SRH1440, SRH1540, SRH1840

Skullcandy Crusher (with and without battery), Hesh 2.0

Sony MDR-1A, MDR-1000X, MDR-7506, MDR-7520, MDR-CD900ST, MDR-V150, MDR-XB450, MDR-XB450AP, MDR-XB650BT, MDR-XB950AP, BDR-XB950BT, MDR-Z7, MDR-XZ110, MDR-ZX110AP, MDR-ZX310, MR-XZ310AP, MDR-ZX770BN, WH-1000MX2

Status Audio CB-1

Superlux HD 668B, HD-330, HD681

Ultrasone Pro 580i, 780i, Signature Studio

V-Moda Crossfade II, M-100

Yamaha HPH-MT5, HPH-MT7, HPH-MT8, HPH-MT220

So there you have it – lots of favorites, and lots of … well, actually, some truly horrible consumer headphones in the mix, too. But I not lots of serious mixers like testing a mix on consumer cans. The advantage of doing that with calibration is presumably that you get to hear the limitations of different headphones, but at the same time, you still hear the reference version of the mix – not the one exaggerated by those particular headphones. That way, you get greater benefit from those additional tests. And you can make better use of random headphones you have around, clearly, even if they’re … well, fairly awful, they can be now still usable.

Even after that long list, I’m sure there’s some stuff you want that’s missing. Sonarworks doesn’t yet support in-ear headphones for its calibration tools, so you can rule that out. For everything else, you can either request support or if you want to get really serious, opt for individual mail-in calibration in Latvia.

More:

https://www.sonarworks.com/reference

The post Your questions answered: Sonarworks Reference calibration tools appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

TASCAM intros TH-07 high definition headphone monitors

TASCAM TH 07 feat

TASCAM has introduced the TH-07 high definition headphone monitors, a premium headphone intended to duplicate the audio quality of high-end near field monitors. The TH-07 has been tuned for full but natural bass, flat mid-range, and clear high end and is suitable for mixing, monitoring, or any audio task demanding outstanding quality. The new headphones […]

The post TASCAM intros TH-07 high definition headphone monitors appeared first on rekkerd.org.

Audio-Technica intros ATH-M50xBT wireless over-ear headphones

Audio-Technica ATH_M50xBT

Audio-Technica has announced the introduction of its ATH-M50xBT wireless over-ear headphones, which bring Bluetooth wireless technology to one of the world’s most acclaimed pro audio and consumer headphones. “Although our M-Series models were originally designed as professional studio monitor headphones, they’ve crossed over into the consumer market to the extent that they’ve become a favorite […]

The post Audio-Technica intros ATH-M50xBT wireless over-ear headphones appeared first on rekkerd.org.

Sonarworks updates Reference 4 with 60 new headphone profiles and increased DAW support

Sonarworks Reference 4 SR

Sonarworks has announced a significant update to its best-in-class Reference 4 software. Key updates in in the 4.1.6 version include a 32-bit plugin in addition to the existing 64-bit one, enabling users with older DAW platforms to take advantage of Reference’s robust measurement and calibration capabilities. Additionally, users are now able to download the latest […]

The post Sonarworks updates Reference 4 with 60 new headphone profiles and increased DAW support appeared first on rekkerd.org.

Audio-Technica offers new microphone/headphone bundles for content creators

Audio Technica AT2035PKAudio-Technica has announced that it is offering four new bundles catered to content creators, including podcasters, videographers, live-streamers, YouTubers, and beyond. Developed in direct response to customer input, these highly cost-effective bundles provide turnkey microphone/headphone solutions for all aspects of content creation. Two bundles feature USB outputs to directly connect with computers, while two feature […]

Steinberg launches new UR22mkII Production Pack

Steinberg UR22mkII ProductionPackSteinberg has announced the immediate availability of a new UR22mkII Production Pack, a complete music recording and production solution. The UR22mkII Production Pack consists of the UR22mkII USB audio interface, ST-H01 studio headphones, ST-M01 studio condenser microphone together with a microphone cable as well as the Cubase Artist 9.5 music production system, WaveLab Elements 9.5 […]