Sequential In The Spotlight Interview with JÖRGEN BOOTS

You can find an interview on Sequential’s website here.

“Jörgen Boots is a Dutch composer, pianist, and synthesist who started out on the organ at the age of 10. Getting into all kinds of music, he began playing in several bands and projects, not only on the organ, but also on piano, synthesizers, guitar, and bass.

Nowadays he is back to the basics composing minimalist piano songs, finding

KORG MS-2000 Kronology

Published on Nov 12, 2018 KORG microKAST

“The microKAST boys revisit the KORG MS-2000, launched in the year 2000.”

"Recursion Mechanism" – a sonic sculpture by Richard Devine

Published on Nov 8, 2018 MAKEN0ISE

“‘Recursion Mechanism’ was a sonic sculpture created by Richard Devine and installed at the Black Mountain College Museum and Arts Center during the Make Noise 10-Year Celebration (June 15-17, 2018).

It featured a large Make Noise system, processing and re-processing the sounds of acoustic instruments activated by gate-controlled drum triggers.

In this

Author & Punisher on DIY Controllers | Red Bull Music Academy

Published on Nov 7, 2018 Red Bull Music Academy

“In this episode of Studio Science, filmed at Moogfest 2018, Author & Punisher explained his DIY philosophy and approach while guiding us through the latest iteration of his performance setup, featuring new versions of his controllers for rhythm, pitch and assignable parameters. #DIY #Moogfest

Author & Punisher is Tristan Shone, a one-man band

Ken Stone and John Hardy using the TEC-1 microcomputer

Published on Nov 5, 2018

Ken Stone of Catgirl Synth/CGS.

“There are videos etc., that attribute the design of the TEC-1 computer to Colin Mitchell. Colin was the editor/publisher. The TEC-1 was designed by John Hardy. Ken Stone then transformed the prototype into the TEC-1 board as it was produced.
Here Ken and John have a chuckle about it.”

Underwater electronic futurism, in the words of James Stinson (Drexciya)

At the turn of the 21st century, one Detroit duo was way ahead. Almost two decades later, the world is revisiting Drexciya and their imagined underwater future – the time is right, and the deepest insights come from James Stinson speaking in his own words.

Drexciyan Cruise Control Bubble 1 to Lardossan Cruiser 8 dash 203 X!

Drexciya, the underground electro duo of the 90s, is enjoying a new resurgence … wait, make that the underwater electro duo enjoying a new submergence? Anyway, cue the Tresor Records re-release, the Resident Advisor spot, the works.

And if you’re not already immersed in this duo’s work, now is a great time to discover or rediscover them. The electro tracks are raw, powerful, grimy, totally Detroit, and in these deadly-serious techno times, unafraid of their own irreverence. “Aquabahn” is sexy and totally, wonderfully, ridiculous:

(They’re not totally kidding, though; everyone I’ve talked to from Underground Resistance has talked about being genuine Kraftwerk fans.)

“Afrofuturism” as a term got applied after the fact (to Drexciya as to the likes of Sun Ra and Juan Atkins). When Drexciya’s 1997 release “The Quest” came out, this was just plain futurism in the words of its creators. But in the liner notes, their journey to imagine an underwater utopia spells out the connection to African-American diasporas and discrimination in overt terms.

From The Quest liner notes – diasporas to global techno to underwater worlds and African return.Source.

The Quest, 1997.

Drexciya were not prone to doing interviews. But apart from being a great musical voice, the late James Stinson, revealed in phone interviews from around the end of the project, had a great voice and articulate vision. And while an under-the-sea world of dreams might seem a preconceived conceit, Stinson says it all came naturally out of the vibes of the music. “We flow with the current,” he told Andrew Duke in 2001. And then he expands on how the concept and life flow out of that, and how water figures into the music.

Listen to him about trying the impossible, ignoring what is supposed to be in music – a perspective that seems in perpetual need in creative life. The whole half hour with journalist Andrew Duke is worth hearing. That’s appropriate, too, as Stinson encourages people to get beyond needle drops and listen to whole tracks and the whole world of Drexciya:

The guy talks about the feeling of music being like the sensation of sitting in a liquid chair made of water. And equally great questions. (“What’s it like to ride a manta ray?”)

Spirit of the underground? James Stinson sums it up perfectly: “Anywhere. Sewer. Underwater. Swimming pool. In the middle of a swamp. In a back alley somewhere … we’ll appear anywhere.”

(This is doubly interesting to me, as a friend from Tehran has recently staged an underwater concert with hydrophones, singing underwater – partly as a way to get around prohibitions on female performance in the country. Stinson was onto something with the radical possibilities of underwater music.)

Punk Collective fan art. From Twitter, via Drexciya Research Lab.

For still more words from the source: in 2002, shortly before his death, James Stinson talked to Liz Copeland, with tracks driving away in the background:

“Just give me the music; forget all the other stuff,” he says. “People need to … dig more into themselves and pull it out, and be more of who they are, and believe in what they do. Don’t worry about what other people are doing.”

Resident Advisor recently summed up all of this in a ten minute video, drawing heavily from those two interviews:

Another navigational chart to the music came in 2012 from the ever-reflective Philip Sherburne, who reviewed an anthology that year and also sums up the music as more than just “electro”:

Adapting the lurching rhythmic template of 1980s electro-funk acts like Man Parrish, Cybotron, and Jonzun Crew, Drexciya emphasized the depth-charge qualities of a booming 808 kick, and the electric-eel jolt of a zapping filter sweep. But it went deeper than that. The music was punctuated by cryptic interludes and scraps of code … Drexciya weren’t just trafficking in metaphor and affect; they were telling a story.

Drexciya: Journey of the Deep Sea Dweller I

It’s also worth reading this interview from 1994 in UK zine The Techno Connection, by Dave Mothersole, republished by fan page Drexciya Research Lab. Yeah, it’s 1994, but it’s easily just as relevant in 2018, though it seems now with the Detroit originators hot as ever on the international scene, it may be time to go back to the surviving Underground Resistance members to hear their current take on the landscape and the word “techno.” As for learning to mix better, even when there’s no 4/4 kick, uh — yeah, we can all listen to that one; that can’t be wrong!

More listening – even Spotify are into this now:

From Función Binaria, a full mix (tracklisting on SC:

It’s also great that Tresor are re-releasing seminal works, including Drexciya – ‘Neptune’s Lair’ – (Tresor.129)
is out November 30th, 2018 on 2LP vinyl. (In time for Hanukkah, even.)

It’s a gift, really, to get to go buy that vinyl and set it on a record player. I do also come back to what Stinson says about originality, though. So maybe the best way to honor the Detroit – Berlin connection is, perversely, to listen, take this in, listen end to end (record players are nice for that), let your mind get altered, and then forget all that and take that energy and vibe and go make your own thing.

And certainly everything’s better down where it’s wetter and all that jazz.

Fan art, Jim McCormack. Also via Drexciya Research Lab. Go check that.

For more Drexciya obsessions, follow Drexciya Research Lab on Blogger(!) and Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/drexciyaresearchlab/

http://drexciyaresearchlab.blogspot.com/

The post Underwater electronic futurism, in the words of James Stinson (Drexciya) appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Sequential In The Spotlight Interview With Florian Fourlin

You can find an interview on Sequential’s website here.

“Florian Fourlin is a singer-songwriter, pianist, saxophonist, and producer from Paris, France. He’s an artist with wide-ranging influences. In 2015, after spending years recording, touring and playing with international artists as a both a session and live musician, he began crafting what would be his first solo album — on which he sings,

Let me introduce myself… My first two keyboards..Casio VL1 + Casio MT68

Published on Oct 26, 2018 synthartist69

“I would like to take the time to introduce myself. My name is Jim, and yes I am a synth addict. These are my first two keyboards.. a Casio VL1 and MT68…Thank you everyone for supporting my channel over the years!”

synthartist69

Casio MT68 “That 80’s sound!!

Published on Oct 26, 2018 synthartist69

“Well, it’s not a Jupiter 8 but this will have to

The taste of music: listen to LJ Rich talk about synesthesia

Synesthesia is a term that gets thrown around a lot, usually to describe the common associations of color, image, and music. But for some people, intermingling of senses can be far more extreme. Listen to LJ Rich talk about what happens when hearing and taste intersect.

LJ Rich is most widely known as presenter of the BBC program Click. She’s also got vast musical experience, from composition to engineering. But for someone so involved in music, her experience is out of the ordinary. Her sense of taste evokes music, and her sense of music evokes taste.

The thing about our senses is, each of us assumes our own experience is the same as everyone else’s – until we hear otherwise. And then, it’s almost impossible to describe; human experience is far more relativistic than any of us can ever hope to understand. But listening to LJ talk about this will both give you insight into her unique way of taking in sound, as well as giving some clues to why music is profound and often cross-sensory for so many of us. She can describe what Debussy tastes like.

This opens up some new interdisciplinary performances; at Music Tech Fest (MTF) in Umeå, Sweden, LJ performed onstage with a bartender, who mixed a cocktail onstage.

LJ’s talk is the content of the first episode of the new MTF podcast. Listen at their site:

https://musictechfest.net/podcast001/

More on her expansive projects:
https://ljrich.wordpress.com/

She’s also been interview on this topic:
Understanding the Connection Between Synesthesia and Absolute Pitch [The Scientist]

You Know What London Looks Like. But Have You Really Heard It? [The New York Times]

I’ll be with the MTF crew by tomorrow morning in Karlsruhe, Germany, as I participate in their #MTFLabs program, for a 24-hour laboratory – live performance in the ZKM Open Codes exhibition.

https://musictechfest.net/mtflabs-zkm/

https://musictechfest.net/podcast001/

More on that soon.

The post The taste of music: listen to LJ Rich talk about synesthesia appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Patch & Tweak Interview with Kim Bjørn

Published on Oct 25, 2018 Ask.Audio

“Whether you’re just becoming interested in modular synths or an experienced veteran the new book by Kim Bjørn and Chris Meyer, Patch & Tweak, is an interesting read! We interview Kim at Elevator Sounds in Bristol, UK about the making of this unique book.”