Modular

Vermona releases randomRHYTHM random-based trigger sequencer

Vermona randomRHYRHMVermona has announced availability of randomRHYTHM, a randomized trigger sequencer/clock divider Eurorack module. randomRHYTHM features four sliders per rhythm section with which to set the probability of quarters, eighths, sixteenths and triplets, allowing you to form sequences. Unlike traditional step sequencers, VERMONA’s just-released randomRHYTHM randomized trigger sequencer / clock divider does not allow its users […]

Moogs klassisches „bewegliches“ Modulsystem IIIp ist wieder da.

Moog Synthesizer IIIp

Via Matrixsynth erreicht uns die Information, dass Moog das ältere „bewegliche“ Modulsystem Moog IIIp wieder bringen wird, nachdem sie die wohl bekannteste „neuere“ Serie anbieten.

Aktuell gibt es schon länger die Systeme 15, 35 und 55, die späteren Datums sind als das ebenfalls angebotene IIIc. Sie alle sind, bis auf das kleine System 15, in großen Holzcases verbaut. Sie verwenden die neueren und stabileren Oszillatoren vom Typ 904. Das nun angebotene System dagegen enthält zehn der älteren Oszillatoren vom Typ 901. Außerdem sind auch die größere Festfilterbank und eine Hallspirale enzhalten. Die Größe der drei Cabinets ist in etwa die des System 15. Daher ist es deutlich transportfreundlicher als die großen Holzrahmen fürs Studio.

Moog IIIP – 901er-Oszillatoren und kompakt

Die Oszillatoren sind bei Moog ohne zusätzliche LFOs ausgestattet. Moog ist sehr konsequent bei der Modularität und daher schaltet man die VCOs einfach in einen niedrigen Frequenzbereich, wenn man einen LFO braucht. So wird das auch mit dem Minimoog gemacht und allen Modulars, die Moog damals baute von den Mittsechzigern bis zur Aufgabe der Modul-Sparte.

Insgesamt sind 37 Module enthalten, die aus der ersten und frühesten Serie stammen. Moog stellte damals die Module selbst zusammen. Es wurde deswegen alles vorgegeben, weil die wenigsten sich darunter etwas vorstellen konnten. Diese Systeme nannte Moog I, II, III, IIIc, IIIp und eben auch System 15, 35 oder 55.

Anders als beim einfachen System 15 kommt hier die vollständige Filterkombination zum Einsatz, die aus 3 Modulen besteht: dem Filter-Koppler, dem resonanzlosen Hochpassfilter und dem resonanten Tiefpass-Modul, welches das wohl Berühmteste seiner Art ist.

Pittsburgh Microvolt 3900 semi-modular analog synth available for preorder

Pittsburgh Microvolt 3900Pittsburgh Modular Synthesizers has announced that it is taking preorders on its Microvolt 3900, a semi-modular desktop synthesizer. The synth features Pittburgh’s new temperature stabilized, dual VCA oscillator core and dynamic VCA technology, offering a lively, organic sounding synthesizer full of energy. A modern, semi-modular synthesizer inspired by the instruments designed by our heroes. The […]

SYS-100 Drums drum library based by Wave Alchemy released

Wave Alchemy SYS-100 DrumsWave Alchemy has launched SYS-100 Drums, a new drum library that is based on the iconic Roland System 100 modular synth, from the creators of the Evolution and Revolution drum machines. The library features 1,584 24-bit WAV, raw and processed (vinyl, tape, outboard) samples for Ableton Live, Battery, Halion, Kontakt, NN-XT, SFZ, and Logic EXS-24. […]

Erica Synths launches Pico System II + DRUM module series & more coming

Erica Synths Pico System IIErica Synths has launched Pico System II, a modular system that adds two new modules for the original Pico System. Pico System II includes the Pico Voice, a sound source which offers considerable timbral diversity, and the Pico Modulator, replacing the Pico EG and the Pico VCA. The remaining single 3HP space has been filled […]

TX Modular is a vast, free set of sound tools in SuperCollider

Granulators, drones, mixing, synths, effects, control, and on and on – TX Modular is an insanely huge set of tools, and the cost is zero.

SuperCollider, the free and open source sound creation environment for Mac, Windows, and Linux, is vast and powerful. The problem is, actually getting into it is … a little arcane. Talk to many frequent SuperCollider users, and what you’ll find is that they’ve assembled personal libraries of code snippets to work with it. So it can feel a bit like trying to talk your way into a secret society, if you’ve come from another sound creation environment.

Paul Miller writes to share his TX Modular System, which gives you the keys to a huge treasure trove of modules, and some easier ways of combining them.

All of this also means you don’t have to touch SuperCollider code if you don’t want to – though you can add that, too, if you like. (And you can run some code without having to build everything else you need from scratch.)

And it’s all just kind of mind boggling. Just to give a small overview, you get – among other things:

Synths and drones. In addition to the more conventional stuff you’d expect, there are a range of unique morphing synths, wave terrain instruments, drone and noise makers – rare, creative stuff. And there are polyphonic synths with a special emphasis on physical modeling and filter-based sound.

Samples and granulators. Grains are part of the appeal of SuperCollider – these instruments have lots of variations to experiment with sound, plus more conventional players, loopers, and sample-based synths.

Effects. There’s an insane amount here: delays, amp simulation and distortion, waveshapers, bitcrushers, extensive dynamic processing, EQ and flter, resonators, reverbs, and then extra stuff like spectral delays, harmonizers, and vocoders. From studio-style processing to weirder realms, it’s the full gamut, and within a modular paradigm.

Mixing and processing. Need a Mid-Side encoder? Faders? It’s there, too.

Control. Arguably, the rise of Eurorack modular has renewed the interest in actually getting creative and musical with patching itself. So, here you get clock dividers and a rich variety of envelopes and the like, in addition to basic LFOs and such. And at the same time, you get modulation that’s only possible in the digital realm, like random walks and Perlin Noise (a particular digital algorithm with nice, organic results), plus physics models of balls and springs.

Hardware input. Here, too, you get some of the advantages of the computer: work with OpenSoundControl natively, add Wiimotes, plenty of MIDI processors, and more.

Sequencers. Most modular environments break down when it comes to the sort of sequencing in DAWs – but not here. There are scale, chord, note processing, and piano roll sequencers, not just some limited step sequencers. You can even work with multiple tracks or use sequencers for modulation and actions.

UI. For building interfaces, you get various widgets for knobs and sliders.

And of course, you still have SuperCollider for extending all of this, with convenient modules for adding your code to the modular environment.

A mature release is out now as of last month, with a powerful new multitrack sequencer and note processing, FM granulator, a new reverb, and module improvements. (In case you were already up and running with TX, you’ll find what’s new in this release, entitled 087, included in the release notes.)

It’s almost ridiculous that Paul has created this for free. But it’s a beautiful, completely open source solution:

http://www.palemoonrising.co.uk/index.html

On Mac, you can download a standalone, but the whole environment works on Mac, Windows, and Linux so long as you install SuperCollider first.

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Royal Blue classic British channel for Chroma and DIYRE Colour shipping

Louder Than Liftoff Royal Blue Colour Module featLouder Than Liftoff has announced that it is shipping the Royal Blue Colour Module, bringing the classic British console sound to Chroma and the Colour format, a new modular platform for creating your own custom analog signal chains. Royal Blue’s circuit was inspired by the 1081 Channel Amplifier used in vintage Neve 80 Series recording […]

Erica are set to bring the 909 into the modular age with their latest gear

Erica may be known for their tube-powered, retro-Polyvoks post-Soviet chic – but now they’re taking on the TR-909, in modules and a powerful drum computer.

This isn’t just another 909 remake, though. Take Roland’s legendary drum machine not just as a selection of well-known sounds, but as a way of thinking about synthesizing and sequencing percussion. Then, make those eminently patchable, so you can wire them into other gear and create some new, original ideas. Erica founder Girts Ozolins told me early on in starting the company that he thought the real appeal of modular was in customization – that it was something that allowed musicians to make something their own. And that seems to be the essence of the idea here. It’s a deconstructed, rather than reconstructed, 909.

On the sound side, then, you’ve got two friendly-looking, handsome, patchable modules. You can bolt these in and grab the knobs and it looks like you’ll be pretty happy. But there’s also plenty of CV when you want to get more modular.

On the sequencing side – and I’ll be the first to say this is what has me excited – comes a 909-style sequencer with accents, multiple tracks and banks, and extras like probability, track length (for polyrhythms), live and step modes, and more. You can sync it with MIDI, but there’s also an absurd amount of patchability.

And there’s modulation, too (here’s where we get way out of 909 territory) – two LFOs for modulating drums.

Just as promising, the whole thing comes from a collaboration with French DIY drum machine maker e-licktronic, who have made a name for themselves as a kind of cult-following underground drum machine maker for DIYers. The problem with e-licktronic was their projects required way too much assembly for all but the most dedicated soldering iron gurus. This brings some of their expertise to a wider market – niche, to be sure, but at least allowing you some time to, like, finish tracks and not just finish hardware assembly.

Full specs:

12x Accent outputs
1x CV/GATE track
2xLFO with independent or synced to the BPM frequency
Time signature per track
Pattern length per track
Shuffle per track
Probability per step
Retrigger per step
Instant pattern switching
Solo/Mute tracks
Step/Tap record modes
16 Banks of 16 Patterns
Instant pattern switching
Pattern linking
Midi sync in with start/stop
Track mode
Firmware upgrade via MIDI SySex

It also seems this is just the beginning – Erica have a whole drum module system in store: “Toms, Clap, Rimshot, HiHats, Cymbals, sample-based drum module and, to pull all system together – dedicated a drum Mixer with extended headroom and a limiter of unique design”

But you don’t have to wait long to get started. The kick and snare modules ship early March, alongside that sequencer.

Hey, Santa Claus! Yeah, I…. oh, wait, $#(*&, it’s March.

Hey, St. Patrick!

NAMM news: Drum Sequencer

NAMM news: Bass Drum & Snare Drum

The post Erica are set to bring the 909 into the modular age with their latest gear appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Finegear launches the Mixerblocks – a modular analog mixing console

the Mixerblocks series is a modular and expandable analog audio mixing console. A variable number of channel strips can be

Video of some of the best new gear from NAMM – and no talking

“Hi, we’re here at NAMM 2018, and –” No. Here’s the actual sound of the new Korg, Pittsburgh Modular, and Radikal gear, minus trade show noise or voiceover.

First, the KORG Prologue, the fascinating new polysynth from KORG with open programmable bits. (We’ve got a separate QA and more details from KORG coming soon!)

The Pittsburgh Modular Microvolt 3900 rides the wave of new desktop semi-modulars – standalone instruments that still provide tons of patching options, just without needing a rack of different modules to set up. And it looks like a fine instrument – though you may opt for the Lifeforms SV-1 if you prefer the flexibility of bolting into a Eurorack later. Price: US$629.

What sets this one apart from semi-modular rivals: performance-friendly and intuitive design, and a really flexible patch bay.

And lastly, there’s the Radikal Technologies Delta CEP A. Like the Pittsburgh piece and Arturia, it pitches itself as an entry point to modular – use it on its own, or as the first steps toward building a modular system. What you get is a paraphonic synth voice. There’s onboard MIDI to CV, so it can interface nicely with your computer or existing MIDI gear. You can choose between onboard digital and analog filters. And effects are built in – plus envelope, and LFO.

If all that sounds a little dull, here’s the juicy bit: you get a “swarm oscillator,” with eight tunable oscillators you can use for “chords, clusters or fat detuned multi-oscillator sounds.”

Mmmmm, swarms!

For good measure, here’s Waldorf’s flagship Quantum, which we first saw last year in Frankfurt.

Thanks to Bonedo for the great videos! More are coming, our friends there tell us!

The post Video of some of the best new gear from NAMM – and no talking appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.