Metagrid 1.5 gives your iPad shortcuts for everything – DAW, notation, Ableton Live

Sure, theoretically you should memorize a bunch of keyboard shortcuts and painstakingly map macros for tools you use every day. Or you could use Metagrid instead.

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MOTU MIDI Timepiece USB AV

via this auction

“An excellent resource to have if you have more than 2 or 3 synths in your setup.”

This is a supporting member listing.

Update via NoiseTheorem in the comments: “It should be noted that the management software is still supported and updated by MOTU. In fact, they just released a version compatible with MacOS Cortana. Mine has been an absolute workhorse over the years.”

CVquencer for iOS

Published on Dec 12, 2019 3AlanC

“CVquencer controlling a Pittburgh Modular system via an Expert Sleepers ES-8 DC-coupled audio interface.”

Published on Dec 11, 2019 3AlanC

“Using CVquencer to play some classic sequences.”

CVquencer calibrating an analog synthesizer

Published on Dec 17, 2019 3AlanC

“CVquencer is using a MOTU UltraLite Mk4 to control a Dreadbox Erebus with CV/Gate. Two

Now that MOTU’s DP does clips, here’s a video explaining how to use them

If you normally leave a DAW like DP in order to do non-linear clip triggering with other software or hardware, MOTU have something they’d like to show you.

There’s no mistaking what this looks like – this really is the Session View from Ableton Live. Then again, we’ve had some glimpse of that for nearly 20 years, so it’s surprising – given the usual leapfrog and borrowing DAWs do in music production – that no traditional DAW has really pulled off the same thing. (Cakewalk’s SONAR tried, as did Cakewalk’s little-known tool called Project5, but their implementation didn’t really catch on, making that more historical footnote than anything.)

Deja vu?

And we’re not only talking about Live – this same sort of non-linear clip triggering is also something familiar in samplers and other tools.

So it is a big deal that MOTU has added clips, with some twists of their own – a couple I wouldn’t mind Ableton picking up on. And I think it’s telling that you aren’t hearing a lot of complaints that this rips off Live, which says to the Live user base and the DP user base are likely fairly independent – or that these tools solve different problems. (Feel free to give more feedback on this, though.)

https://motu.com/products/software/dp/

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MOTU releases Digital Performer 10.1 with dozens of new features

MOTU DP10 update

MOTU has announced the release of Digital Performer 10.1, a free update for all DP10 owners with dozens of new features. Version 10.1 includes clips in tracks, clip recording, real-time and off-line stem bouncing, retrospective MIDI record, workflow enhancements and performance optimizations. Clips in Tracks and Clip Recording Clips (phrases of MIDI or audio data) […]

The post MOTU releases Digital Performer 10.1 with dozens of new features appeared first on rekkerd.org.

MOTU’s new audio interfaces may finally be what we all need – $169.95

The no-compromise and entry-level audio interface – it’s something that should be impossible, but MOTU might have just cracked it.

I have literally been trying to pack suitcases for a long trip, staring at audio interfaces because I can’t find the one that does what I need. I’ve been equally stumped sometimes asking inevitable questions from friends about what they should buy.

MOTU has always made great audio interfaces. But many of them require drivers, which means your Linux-running laptop with Bitwig Studio or your iPad with those great new Eventide apps are both out of luck. Or they don’t fit a small budget.

So the M2 / M4 genuinely surprised me. They have the specs of a high-end box from MOTU or others, but they start at US$169.95 and at last they also work with every OS, all squeezed into a portable package.

Here’s what you might not expect:

High-end converters

2.5 ms latency with their drivers

A high-res color screen and built-in metering (unheard of at this price)

RCA outs? MIDI I/O? Sure!

But that’s not why I say they’re really no-compromise (though the high-end converters surely go there). MOTU did their own custom USB drivers for ultra low-latency performance on Mac and Windows but they also made this class-compliant – so it doesn’t need drivers on Linux or iOS or Android.

And then the pricing is stupidly nice.

So finally, one little box does everything – and if you get into the iPad or Android or Raspberry Pi, you don’t have to go buy another interface.

Yes, these are USB-C but that will also connect to your existing USB A connection.

Promising stuff – I’ll be interested to pick one to review (or pick up one to hopefully keep).

Full specs from MOTU:

• 2-in / 2-out and 4-in / 4-out USB audio interfaces with studio-quality sound
• Best-in-class audio quality driven by ESS Sabre32 Ultra™ DAC Technology
• Best-in-class speed (ultra-low latency) for host software processing
• Best-in-class metering for all inputs/outputs with a full-color LCD
• 2x mic/line/hi-Z guitar inputs on combo XLR/TRS
• Individual preamp gain and 48V phantom power for each input
• 2x balanced 1/4-inch line inputs (M4 only)
• Hardware (direct) monitoring for each input
• Monitor mix knob to balance live inputs and computer playback (M4 only)
• Measured -129 dB EIN on mic inputs
• Balanced, DC-coupled 1/4-inch TRS outputs (2x for M2; 4x for M4)
• Measured 120 dB dynamic range on the 1/4-inch balanced TRS outputs
• RCA (unbalanced) analog outs that mirror 1/4-inch outs (2x for M2; 4x for M4)
• 1x headphone out (driven by ESS converters) with independent volume control
• MIDI in/out
• Support for 44.1 to 192 kHz sample rates
• USB audio class compliant for plug-and-play operation on Mac (no driver required)
• Windows driver with 2.5 ms Round Trip Latency (32 sample buffer at 96 kHz)
• Mac driver (optional, for 2.5 ms RTL@32/96 kHz and loopback feature)
• iOS compatible (USB audio class compliant) 
• Driver loopback for capturing host output, live streaming and podcasting
• Bus powered USB-C (compatible with USB Type A) with power switch (USB cable included)
• Rugged metal construction
• Workstation software included (MOTU Performer Lite 10 and Ableton Live Lite 10)
• 100+ instruments (in Performer Lite)
• Over 6 GB of included free loops, samples and one-shots from industry leading libraries
• Kensington security slot
• Built in the USA
• Two-year warranty

Now shipping, $169.95 for the 2×2 M2, or if you want 4 ins and 4 outs, $219.95 for the M4.

https://new.motu.com/en-us/products/m-series/m2/

https://new.motu.com/en-us/products/m-series/m4/

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MOTU M2 and M4 audio interfaces now shipping

MOTU M4

MOTU has announced that it is now shipping the M2 and M4, two new USB bus-powered audio interfaces for Mac, Windows and iOS offering best-in-class audio quality, best-in-class speed (ultra-low latency) and best-in-class metering with a full-color LCD. With two and four channels of audio I/O, respectively, the M2 and M4 include individual 48V phantom […]

The post MOTU M2 and M4 audio interfaces now shipping appeared first on rekkerd.org.

TS Music Unboxing Videos

Published on Aug 6, 2019 TS Music

Playlist at the time of this post:
Intellijel Atlantis / synthesizer voice (Roland sh-101)
Assimil8or sampler (Rossum Electro-Music) unboxing
Trident multi-synchronic Oscillator (Rossum Electro) unboxing
Winter Modular Eloquencer silver (Eurorack Sequenzer)
Winter Modular Eloquencer black (Eurorack Sequenzer) unboxing
Endorphines BLCK _ Noir (Drum Modul /

Get going with MOTU’s DP10 with these videos

DP10 for Mac and Windows, unveiled this spring, brought breakthrough features to the long-standing favorite DAW called Digital Performer. So now it’s time to dig in and start using the new stuff.

DP has never been short on updates, but some of them certainly felt iterative. And the software had to make the jump from Mac to Windows, which initially got tricky with Windows’ archaic high-density display support and left the screen hard to see.

DP10 is interesting because it brings some genuinely new ideas. There’s a Clip View that looks an awful lot like Ableton’s Session View, but with some new twists – and in a more traditional DAW, with stuff like proper video and cue support which Live so sorely lacks. There are more ways to manipulate audio and pitch without jumping into a plug-in. There’s a substantially beefed-up waveform editor. If you missed it before, I covered this when it debuted in February:

DP10 adds clip launching, improved audio editing to MOTU’s DAW

Or watch Sound on Sound‘s breakdown of the upgrade:

I’m a great fan of written tutorials, but some of this stuff really does benefit from a visual aid. So let’s get started. As it happens, while it’s a bit hidden, you can now download a 30-day demo – enough time to try finishing a project in DP and see if you like it. They’ve got a US$395 upgrade from competing products, so DP fits nicely in a mid-range price point when some competing options have crept up to a grand or more. (Cough, you know who you are.)

http://www.motu.com/download

First, Thomas Foster will hold your hand and walk you through a total-beginner walkthrough of how to get started with DP10. And unlike MOTU’s own videos, this one is also oriented toward in-the-box electronic production – so it’ll be friendly to a lot of the sorts who read this site.

From the absolute beginning, here’s a look at actually creating something, using the Model12 and the BassLine instruments:

(If you want to get more advanced with BassLine, check the MOTU videos below.)

And also at the 101-level, importing audio and applying audio effects to vocals:

VCA Faders are one of the more unique new features – here’s a walkthrough focused on that:

Lastly, round about March MOTU posted a huge trove of demos and tutorials from seminars at NAMM. It’s maybe doubly interesting for including some industry heavyweights – Family Guy composer Walter Murphy, LA producer/composer David Das, Mike McKnight who programs and plays keyboards for Roger Waters, music tech legend Craig Anderton, and more.

It’s easier to navigate what’s available from MOTU’s blog than in the distracting maze that is YouTube, so have a look here:

MOTU demos from NAMM 2019

I expect some CDM readers out there are DP users, so I’d love to hear from you about how you feel about this update and how you use the software in your work.

And as always, if there’s a tool you want to see featured, don’t hesitate to write.

The post Get going with MOTU’s DP10 with these videos appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Ableton release free CV Tools for integrating with analog gear, made in Max

It’s all about voltage these days. Ableton’s new CV Tools are designed for integrating with modular and semi-modular/desktop gear with CV. And they’re built in Max – meaning builders can learn from these tools and build their own.

The basic idea of CV Tools, like any software-CV integration, is to use your computer as an additional source of modulation and control. You route analog signal directly to your audio interface – you’ll need an interface that has DC coupled outputs (more about that separately). But once you do that, you can make your software and hardware rigs work together, and use your computer’s visual interface and open-ended possibilities to do still more stuff with analog gear.

This is coming on the eve of Superbooth, and certainly a lot of the audience will be people with modular racks. But nowadays, hardware with CV I/O is hardly limited to Eurorack – gear from the likes of Moog, Arturia, KORG, and others also makes sense with CV.

CV Tools aren’t the first Max for Live tools for Ableton Live – not by far. Spektro Audio makes the free CV Toolkit Mini, for instance. Its main advantage is a single, integrated interface – and a clever patch bay. There’s a more extensive version available for US$19.99.

Rival DAW Bitwig Studio, for its part, has taken an entirely different approach – you’ll get a software modular engine capable of interlinking with hardware CV wherever you like.

Ableton’s own CV Tools is news, though, in that these modules are powerful, flexible, and polished, and have a very Ableton-esque UI. They also come from a collaboration with Skinnerbox, the live performance-oriented gearheads here in Berlin, so I have no doubt they’ll be useful. (Yep, that’s them in the video.) I think there’s no reason not to grab this and Spektro and go to town.

And since these are built in Max, Max patchers may want to take a look inside – to mod or use as the basis of your own.

What you get:

CV Instrument lets you treat outboard modular/analog gear as if it’s integrated with Live as a plug-in.

Trigger drums and rhythms with CV Triggers.

CV Utility is a signal processing hub inside Live.

CV Instrument, with complements existing Ableton devices for integrating outboard MIDI instruments and effects with your projects in Live

CV Triggers for sequencing drum modules

CV Utility for adding automation curves, add/shift/multiple signals, and other processing tools

CV Clock In and CV Clock Out for clocking Live from outboard analog gear and visa versa

CV In which connects outboard analog signal directly to modulation of parameters inside Live

CV Shaper, CV Envelope Follower, and CV LFO which gives you graphical tools for designing modulation inside Live and using it for CV control of your analog hardware

And there’s more: the Rotating Rhythm Generator, which lets you dial up polyrhythms. This one works with both MIDI and CV, so you can work with either kind of external hardware.

I got to chat with Skinnerbox, and there’s even more here than may be immediately obvious.

For one thing, you get what they tell us is “extremely accurate broad-range” auto calibration of oscillators, filters, and so on. That’s often an issue with analog equipment, especially once you start getting complex or adding polyphony (or creating polyphony by mixing your software instruments with your hardware). Here’s a quick demo:

Clocking they say is “jitter free” and “super high resolution.”

So this means you can make a monster hybrid combining your computer running Ableton Live (and all your software) with hardware, without having to have the clock be all over the place or everything out of tune. (Well, unless that’s what you’re going for!)

If you’re in Berlin, Skinnerbox will play live with the rig this Friday at Superbooth.

They sent us this quick demo of working with the calibration tools, resulting in an accurate ten-octave range (here with oscillator from Endorphin.es).

Watch:

To interface with their gear, they’re using the Expert Sleepers ES8 interface in the modular. You could also use a DC-coupled audio interface, though – MOTU audio interfaces are a popular choice, since they’ve got a huge range of interfaces with DC coupling across various interface configurations.

CV Tools is listed as “coming soon,” but a beta version is available now.

https://www.ableton.com/en/blog/cv-tools-live-coming-soon/

What do you need to use this?

For full CV control of analog gear, you’ll want a DC-coupled audio interface. Most audio interfaces lack that feature – I’m writing an explanation of this in a separate story – but if you do have one with compatible outputs, you’ll be able to take full advantage of the features here, including tuned pitch control. MOTU have probably made more interfaces that work than anyone else. You can also look to a dedicated interface like the Expert Sleepers one Skinnerbox used in the video above.

See MOTU and Expert Sleepers, both of which Skinnerbox have tested:

http://motu.com/products

https://www.expert-sleepers.co.uk/es8.html

MOTU also have a more technical article on testing audio interfaces if you’re handy with a voltmeter, plus specs on range on all their interfaces.

Universal Audio have already written to say they’ll be demoing DC coupling on their audio interfaces at Superbooth with Ableton’s CV Tools, so their stuff works, too. (Double-checking which models they’re using.)

But wait – just because you lack the hardware doesn’t mean you can’t use some of the functionality here with other audio interfaces. Skinnerbox remind us that any audio interface inputs will work with CV In in Pitch mode. Clock in and out will work with any device, too.

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