Free Downgrade turns Ableton Live into lo-fi wobbly vaporwave tape

Fidelity? High-quality sound? No – degradation! And if you don’t have a ragged VHS deck or cassette Walkman handy, these free effects racks in Ableton Live will sort you out.

Downgrade is the work of Tom Cosm, long-time Ableton guru. There are five effects:

Fluffer
Corrupt
Hiss
Morph
Flutter

— plus if you give him literally US$1 or more (you cheapskate), you get an additional Stutter rack.

Basically, you get loads of controls for manipulating downsampling, tape effects, saturation, distortion, modulation of various kinds, echo, vocoder, and more. It’s a sort of retro Vaporwave starter kit if you’d like to think of it that way – or an easy, dial-up greatest hits of everything Ableton Live can now do to make your sound worse. And by worse, I mean better, naturally.

Ableton have been gradually adding all these digital downsampling features (early on) and simulated analog tape and saturation effects and nonlinear modulation (more recently). Tom has neatly packed them into one very useful set of Racks.

Notice I say “Racks,” not Max for Live devices. That means these will mostly run on different editions of Live, and they’re a bit easier to pick apart and adjust/modify – without requiring Max knowledge.

Go download them:

https://gumroad.com/l/wmIbJ

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LP24 releases Arcade retro synth inspired Serum collection

LP24 Arcade for Serum

LP24 has announced the release of Arcade, a soundset featuring a collection of retro synth inspired sounds for the Serum wavetable synthesizer from Xfer Records. Inside you’ll find 90 Xfer Serum presets inspired by classic video game soundtracks, synthwave, cyberpunk, 1980’s film music, and neo-synth genres. Find every type of retro sound you’ll need, many […]

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Luftrum’s Retro City brings retro-futuristic sounds of Synthwave to u-he Diva

Luftrum Retro City for Diva

Luftrum has launched a new soundset featuring a collection of 85 Synthwave style presets for the Diva virtual analog synthesizer from u-he. Retro City is a retro-futuristic flashback into the beating heart of the 1980’s from the night drives with your favorite mix-tape on loop to the magenta neon lights in L.A. Packed with nostalgia, […]

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Mournful drone sounds of a repurposed HP test device

Hainbach continues to make beautiful sounds with esoteric or forgotten gear – this time, the “saddest drone machine,” a used HP 3782A Error Detector telco device.

It’s wonderful sometimes the things esoteric gear makes. In the earlier, more analog age, a lot of telecommunications worked in the audible spectrum with tones you can hear. In this case, this HP device produces a set of patterns that sounds surprisingly musical, if melancholy:

Hainbach doesn’t include the description, but surprisingly a quick search suggests people still repair and use these devices. Oh yeah, and these actually work on digital equipment, but in audible-range patterns:

The HP 3782A Error Detector used with a HP 3781A Pattern Generator forms a flexible, high-performance error measuring system for digital transmission equipment in the CEPT digital hierarchy. They provide 2, 8, and 34 Mb/s interfaces and binary ECL operation up to 50 Mb/s. Automated or remote measurement capability with HP-IB. Measurements can be made on all types of digital transmission systems including cable, digital radio, satellite, and lightwave. The pattern generator provides a wide range of test patterns including PRBS for simulating live traffic and shorter WORD patterns for checking pattern sensitivity in transmission equipment. Binary and code error injection capability is included for stress-testing line terminating equipment. A jitter modulation input is provided to add controlled amounts of jitter to the output test pattern and perform jitter tolerance tests on equipment interfaces.

Sounds like a wholesome good time for the whole family.

More:

Keep the machines lit: https://patreon.com/hainbach
Questions and answers: http://reddit.com/r/hainbach
Chat: https://discord.gg/MUBp5AB

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Save 30% OFF VirtualCZ synthesizer + FREE Retro Electro Expansion

PluginBoutique VirtualCZ 30 Retro Electro FREE

Plugin Boutique has launched a limited time sale on the VirtualCZ virtual phase distortion synthesizer instrument. VirtualCZ is an emulation of the synthesis engine from the CASIO CZ range of synthesisers that were produced in the 1980s. It also functions as an editor for those synthesisers, since it can save, load and transmit CZ System […]

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Save 50% on XLN Audio’s Addictive Drums & Keys, RC-20 Retro Color & more

XLN Audio 50 OFF Sale

Plugin Boutique has announced a flash sale on XLN Audio, offering a 50% discount on its plugins and bundles for a few days only. The sale includes the Addictive Drums and Addictive Keys product lines, as well as he popular RC-20 Retro Color creative effect plugin for adding life and texture to any recording. RC-20’s […]

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Neon Synthwave Expansion for Carbon Electra brings Future-Retro inspired sounds

PIB Carbon Electra Neon Synthwave

Plugin Boutique has launched a new Carbon Electra expansion pack with 64 fresh sounds for the popular virtual synthesizer instrument. Neon Synthwave is a must for any producer looking to use Carbon Electra for Future-Retro inspired styles such as Synthwave, Retro-Electro, Ambient Electronica and Cinematic 80’s Soundtrack music. The pack is focused around the use […]

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The Stylophone goes totally luxe with the GEN R-8

You’ve seen the Stylophone as the mass-produced, toy-like original. And you’ve seen it as a relaunched digital emulation and as an analog instrument. Now get ready for the Stylophone as premium boutique instrument.

The Stylophone began its story back in 1967, and became one of the iconic electronic musical inventions of the 20th century – its appeal being largely to do with its simplicity and directness. The son of the original inventor, Ben Jarvis, went on to revive instrument under the original manufacturer name, Dubreq.

Now, the GEN R-8 is here with some advanced features and flowery description about British circuitry you might expect from the ad copy for a high-end mixing desk. There’s something a bit funny about associating that with the instrument so long known as a (very musical) toy, but – think of the GEN R-8 as a new desktop synth, the full-featured, grown-up monster child of the original.

Oh, and — it sounds like it’s going to be a total bass beast.

So you know in campy horror movies where someone gets hit with a growth ray or radiation or whatever, and turns into a city-smashing giant? Hopefully this is like that, in a good way.

Sound specs:

Dual analog oscillators (VCOs) and full analog signal path.
Divide-down sub-oscillators (one octave lower) and subsub oscillators (two octaves lower) – switch them all on, and you get six oscillators at once.
12 dB state variable filter – low pass, high pass, band pass, wide notch – which they say is their own proprietary design.
ADSR envelope, now with a “punchy” shorter hold stage when you crank attack and decay peaks, they say.

There’s a delay, too – based on the Princeton pt2399 chip, and “grungy” in the creators’ description – which you can modulate via time CV input.

And some classic overdrive, plus an extra booster stage – this part does actually sound a bit like classic British console gear.

And there’s a step sequencer – 8 banks, 16 steps per sequence, both for the internal synth and external gear (CV/gate and MIDI output).

Plus the whole thing is patchable:
There’s an LFO with eight waveforms and dual outputs, which you can patch to all of the CV ins or to other gear.
The patch panel has 19 minijack CV/gate and audio patch points.

The keyboard is now touch-based – so you don’t need a stylus – and has a sort of absurd set of features (MIDI controller output with local on/off, glide and modulation keys, three octaves of keys).

And it’s made of steel.

Price: £299 / $349 / €329
Availability: Late February 2019 [limited edition]

So it’s really Stylophone on steroids – fully patchable, with delay and drive and filter, MIDI and CV, ready to use as a new synth or as a controller tool with other gear (other semi-modulars, Eurorack, MIDI instruments, whatever). It does appear one of the more interesting new instruments of the year – one to watch.

Demo:

https://dubreq.com/genr8/

The post The Stylophone goes totally luxe with the GEN R-8 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

NAMM 2019: Korg Volca Drum – Machinedrum ähnliche digitale Percussion im Kleinformat

Korg Volca Drum Digital Percussion Synthesizer Close UpKorg Volca Drum Digital Percussion Synthesizer Close Up

Korg hat nicht nur den (bereits geleakte) neuen Volca Modular pünktlich vor der NAMM 2019 fertiggestellt, sondern auch noch das Volca Drum. Es spezialisiert sich auf die typisch „synthetischen“ Klänge von digitalen Drummachines, kann aber ein wenig mehr. Es erzeugt Sounds nicht analog oder via PCM-Samples, sondern berechnet via DSP – das gibt eine Latte an Möglichkeiten.

Eigentlich ist die Idee auch für Korg nicht neu, denn die Electribe R war genau das, eine digitale Drummachine, die aber die klassischen Drum-Modelle an Bord hat. Es gibt 6 Drumsounds, die allesamt synthetisch sind. Es erinnert an Elektrons Machinedrum, auch weil es sogar ein richtiges Display gibt, welches Wellenformen und mehr darstellt. Ein Drumsound besteht generell aus einem Rauschanteil und einem tonalen Part und die kann man hier entsprechend einstellen. Dafür gibt es drei Potis für den Klang selbst und weitere für Hüllkurven der jeweiligen Anteile der Sounds wie etwa der Snare.

Der 16-Step-Sequencer animiert die sechs Sounds und damit ist der Drum das Gegenstück zur Sample-Volca oder der Microtonic unter den Volcas. Auch vorher gab es ja eine analoge Drummachine bei den Volcas, den „Beats“, aber der ist eher wie ein klassischer Drumcomputer aufgebaut mit wenigen Einstellmöglichkeiten und erinnert eher an die MFB Drummachines, als diese noch sehr klein und blau waren. Die Erzeugung ist aber nicht nur mit Filter oder Oszillator in der einfachen Form vorhanden, es gibt durchaus auch noch Wavefolding für mehr Obertöne. Es sind schon ganze Drum-Modelle, so ähnlich wie Elektrons „Machines“. Wie auch immer man sie nennt, sie sind alle nicht neu, nur sind sie in einer Volca neu. Die Preise stehen nicht endgültig fest, man kann aber mit unter 199 Euro rechnen.

Korg Volca Drum

Korg Volca Drum Digital Percussion Synthesizer

Mehr Infos

Videos

NAMM 2019: Korg Volca Drum – Machinedrum ähnliche digitale Percussion im Kleinformat

Korg Volca Drum Digital Percussion Synthesizer Close UpKorg Volca Drum Digital Percussion Synthesizer Close Up

Korg hat nicht nur den (bereits geleakte) neuen Volca Modular pünktlich vor der NAMM 2019 fertiggestellt, sondern auch noch das Volca Drum. Es spezialisiert sich auf die typisch „synthetischen“ Klänge von digitalen Drummachines, kann aber ein wenig mehr. Es erzeugt Sounds nicht analog oder via PCM-Samples, sondern berechnet via DSP – das gibt eine Latte an Möglichkeiten.

Eigentlich ist die Idee auch für Korg nicht neu, denn die Electribe R war genau das, eine digitale Drummachine, die aber die klassischen Drum-Modelle an Bord hat. Es gibt 6 Drumsounds, die allesamt synthetisch sind. Es erinnert an Elektrons Machinedrum, auch weil es sogar ein richtiges Display gibt, welches Wellenformen und mehr darstellt. Ein Drumsound besteht generell aus einem Rauschanteil und einem tonalen Part und die kann man hier entsprechend einstellen. Dafür gibt es drei Potis für den Klang selbst und weitere für Hüllkurven der jeweiligen Anteile der Sounds wie etwa der Snare.

Der 16-Step-Sequencer animiert die sechs Sounds und damit ist der Drum das Gegenstück zur Sample-Volca oder der Microtonic unter den Volcas. Auch vorher gab es ja eine analoge Drummachine bei den Volcas, den „Beats“, aber der ist eher wie ein klassischer Drumcomputer aufgebaut mit wenigen Einstellmöglichkeiten und erinnert eher an die MFB Drummachines, als diese noch sehr klein und blau waren. Die Erzeugung ist aber nicht nur mit Filter oder Oszillator in der einfachen Form vorhanden, es gibt durchaus auch noch Wavefolding für mehr Obertöne. Es sind schon ganze Drum-Modelle, so ähnlich wie Elektrons „Machines“. Wie auch immer man sie nennt, sie sind alle nicht neu, nur sind sie in einer Volca neu. Die Preise stehen nicht endgültig fest, man kann aber mit unter 199 Euro rechnen.

Korg Volca Drum

Korg Volca Drum Digital Percussion Synthesizer

Mehr Infos

Videos