Introducing the Delaydelus Sampler / Delay Instrument from Bleep Labs

Bleep Labs has introduced the Delaydelus 2  – a modular-friendly follow up to their original sampler/delay instrument, a collaboration between Daedelus and Dr. Bleep.… Read More Introducing the Delaydelus Sampler / Delay Instrument from Bleep Labs

Teenage Engineering OP-Z erhält Sampling mit Update 1.2.5.

OP Z SamplingOP Z Sampling

Der OP-Z ist für knapp 600€ zu haben und ist ein multitimbraler Alleskönner. Bisher hatte er zwar ein Sample-Pack im Gepäck, aber man konnte nicht weit darüber hinaus agieren. Jetzt kann man selbst und direkt mit dem OP-Z aufnehmen!

Sampling!

Die Art und Weise des Samplings ist in zwei Typen aufgeteilt, nämlich Synthesizer und Drums. Ein Sample-Drumset kann bis zu 24 Samples enthalten, die als ein Kit abgespeichert und geladen werden können. Der Synthesizer ist für tonales Spiel der einzelnen Sounds da. Eingestellt werden kann die Abspiel-Richtung, Start, Ende und natürlich kann das Sample auch rückwärts abgespielt werden.

Weitere Verbesserungen

Das Update selbst verbessert die Stabilität, erlaubt den Sample-Import und auch die Option eine Spur lauter zu machen, bevor Effekte verwendet werden. Außerdem sind ein paar kleine Dinge, die bisher nicht möglich waren eingebaut worden, wie etwa die Verbesserung der Arpeggio-Modes. Man kann jetzt direkt vom Headset aus aufnehmen und es wird ein Clock-Signal ausgesendet, auch wenn MIDI out, abgeschaltet ist. Außerdem wurden auch weitere Sync- und andere Fehlerchen behoben.

Insgesamt profitiert der kleine mobile musikalische Musik-Malkasten sehr von dem Update, weshalb man es eigentlich sofort einspielen sollte. Wenn man keinen OP-Z hat, hat man allerdings auch keinen OP-Z, dann muss man sich den auch noch kaufen oder hat jetzt Lust drauf bekommen.

Weitere Information

Teenage Engineering hat den Download bereits hier online gestellt. Welche Tasten wie zu drücken sind für das Sampling wird hier beschrieben.

Teenage Engineering Updates OP-Z With Sampling & More

Teenage Engineering has updated the OP-Z with sampling and more.… Read More Teenage Engineering Updates OP-Z With Sampling & More

The OP-Z now samples, too, in Teenage Engineering software update

The OP-Z is the aggressively minimalist, love it-or-hate-it compact synth. But now an update makes it make way more sense – with sampling available, this pint sized synth turns into the instrument it was meant to be.

Teenage Engineering have always said the OP-Z isn’t a replacement for the Teenagers’ original OP-1. Instead, it’s a … successor that comes after the OP-1, builds on the OP-1 features, and at first was available in place of the OP-1, which was initially not available and now is available but prohibitively expensive.

Okay, whatever. The OP-Z is totally a replacement for the OP-1, with some new ideas and form factor and no more screen. But that’s great, actually. To the extent the OP-Z pisses off and confuses some consumers, it does so even more than the OP-1 initially did.

And what’s the point of having a compact, candy bar-shaped synth that obviously resembles a Casio CZ-1 if it doesn’t sample?

Adding sampling to the OP-Z means you can really make it your own, mangling sounds through its grungy but expressive interface. All that minimalism may lessen the value of this device for some, but for those willing to throw themselves into the workflow, it’s liberating – the portability and lack of distraction or surface complexity propelling your musical imagination somewhere different.

Or not. Because I think the thing that’s lovely about Teenage Engineering is that their synths don’t have to please everyone – they’re willing to please some people more while pleasing other people less.

But the bottom line is, this is the update that brings the OP-Z in line with its initial promise and what the OP-1 could do. Once you learn the shortcuts and use the force, you might not even miss the display (though the iPhone/iPad app is there, at least while you memorize the layout).

Sampling also lets this double as an audio interface. I still think you’ll want the oplab module for I/O, and I wish they’d just make that standard. But if you’re willing to splurge on an idiosyncratic device, there’s nothing quite like the OP-Z.

In this update:

new sampling mode

2 channel audio interface

full OP-1 sample format support (pitch, gain, playmode, reverse)

improved stability

support importing raw samples to drum tracks

apply track gain before fx sends

don’t allow copying empty steps
restart arpeggio with TRACK + PLAY on arpeggio track
don’t trigger gate step component if track is muted
toggle headset input with SCREEN + SHIFT

send clock out if enabled even though midi out is disabled
don’t loose clock sync when switching project via pattern change
fix broken parameter spark random setting
fix force save not working on project 1
fix inverted headphone gain levels dep. on impedance

note!
this firmware adds support for the gain, play direction and playmode settings of the OP-1 sample format. in older firmwares, these settings were ignored. this might lead to your patterns sounding different if you are using custom samplepacks. the most likely culprit will be the playmode setting. the OP-1 defaults to GATE, while the OP-Z used to treat everything as RETRIG. Adjust your playmode setting on each sample to RETRIG, to get it sounding like before.
if your track levels change due to the gain setting, either adjust the track volume, or adjust the per sample gain value.

Here’s the original OP-1 sampling feature, explained:

The post The OP-Z now samples, too, in Teenage Engineering software update appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The OP-Z now samples, too, in Teenage Engineering software update

The OP-Z is the aggressively minimalist, love it-or-hate-it compact synth. But now an update makes it make way more sense – with sampling available, this pint sized synth turns into the instrument it was meant to be.

Teenage Engineering have always said the OP-Z isn’t a replacement for the Teenagers’ original OP-1. Instead, it’s a … successor that comes after the OP-1, builds on the OP-1 features, and at first was available in place of the OP-1, which was initially not available and now is available but prohibitively expensive.

Okay, whatever. The OP-Z is totally a replacement for the OP-1, with some new ideas and form factor and no more screen. But that’s great, actually. To the extent the OP-Z pisses off and confuses some consumers, it does so even more than the OP-1 initially did.

And what’s the point of having a compact, candy bar-shaped synth that obviously resembles a Casio CZ-1 if it doesn’t sample?

Adding sampling to the OP-Z means you can really make it your own, mangling sounds through its grungy but expressive interface. All that minimalism may lessen the value of this device for some, but for those willing to throw themselves into the workflow, it’s liberating – the portability and lack of distraction or surface complexity propelling your musical imagination somewhere different.

Or not. Because I think the thing that’s lovely about Teenage Engineering is that their synths don’t have to please everyone – they’re willing to please some people more while pleasing other people less.

But the bottom line is, this is the update that brings the OP-Z in line with its initial promise and what the OP-1 could do. Once you learn the shortcuts and use the force, you might not even miss the display (though the iPhone/iPad app is there, at least while you memorize the layout).

Sampling also lets this double as an audio interface. I still think you’ll want the oplab module for I/O, and I wish they’d just make that standard. But if you’re willing to splurge on an idiosyncratic device, there’s nothing quite like the OP-Z.

In this update:

new sampling mode

2 channel audio interface

full OP-1 sample format support (pitch, gain, playmode, reverse)

improved stability

support importing raw samples to drum tracks

apply track gain before fx sends

don’t allow copying empty steps
restart arpeggio with TRACK + PLAY on arpeggio track
don’t trigger gate step component if track is muted
toggle headset input with SCREEN + SHIFT

send clock out if enabled even though midi out is disabled
don’t loose clock sync when switching project via pattern change
fix broken parameter spark random setting
fix force save not working on project 1
fix inverted headphone gain levels dep. on impedance

note!
this firmware adds support for the gain, play direction and playmode settings of the OP-1 sample format. in older firmwares, these settings were ignored. this might lead to your patterns sounding different if you are using custom samplepacks. the most likely culprit will be the playmode setting. the OP-1 defaults to GATE, while the OP-Z used to treat everything as RETRIG. Adjust your playmode setting on each sample to RETRIG, to get it sounding like before.
if your track levels change due to the gain setting, either adjust the track volume, or adjust the per sample gain value.

Here’s the original OP-1 sampling feature, explained:

The post The OP-Z now samples, too, in Teenage Engineering software update appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The E-mu SP-1200 sampler is getting a reboot: SP 2400

It’s meant as a “spiritual successor,” say the creators – with both emulation of the classic E-mu sound and new features. But the SP 2400 in preorder still hope to bank off the renown of one of the most popular samplers ever, the genre-defining E-mu SP-1200.

All of this could be a test of the clone craze. Sure, 12-bit lo-fi sound has some real potential for music making. And the E-mu layout, with faders and pads, is accessible.

But at US$949, and only a preorder shipping some time in the winter, the SP 2400 isn’t the most practical choice. You’ve now got plenty of options from KORG, Elektron, Roland (including their wildly popular TR-8S), and even smaller makers like MFB for a grand or less – some of them a fraction of this cost. All of those can be had right now, without dropping hundreds of bucks in June to get something that could take until January or longer. Not to mention we may see a Behringer take on this idea shortly, knowing how that company follows social media.

In a way, then, these sorts of reboots are beginning to become like the remakes of classic cars – a sort of genre all their own. There’s a price premium and a practicality cost, but if you want something that looks like a classic with some upgraded innards beneath, you’ve got options.

That said, there’s a nice feature set here. I like the idea of the 12-bit/26k mode, though I wonder if they’ve recreated the signature filter sound of the E-mu. And while I’m a bit too skeptical to endorse dropping cash just for half a year of “bi-weekly progress reports … via this website, social media channels, and emails,” it could be worth a look when it arrives.

The real draw here is probably that this actually samples – including a looper mode. That’s a feature missing on a lot of current gear.

It’s the creation of ISLA Instruments, who also made the KordBot. I’m curious how people fared with that crowdfunding project and the final result, which would be a great indicator of how to take this one.

I just hope that new ideas get as much attention as reboots of old ones. Heck, I feel that way about TV and movies. It’s obviously summer.

But here are those admittedly rather appealing specs –

• Sturdy 4-piece Steel/Aluminium enclosure.
• Mains Powered 100-250V AC.
• Dual Audio Engine:
12-Bit/26.04khz Lo-Fi Engine (Classic SP Sound) and 24-Bit/48khz Hi-Fi Engine
• Stereo Recording/Playback.
• Channels 1-8 Pannable to Main out L/R Channels 7+8 can be ‘linked’ to support stereo audio content.
• Headphone Output (9-10) w/independant monitoring of channels.
• Dedicated Microphone Pre-Amp.
• Looper Pedal Mode (with full duplex recording/playback).
• Record and overdub live audio during playback.
• USB Host & Device Ports:
Connect usb thumb drives, keyboards, midi controllers directly into the SP2400.

The post The E-mu SP-1200 sampler is getting a reboot: SP 2400 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Kostenloser Sample Editor für Sequential Prophet X

Lady Gaia Prophet Sample EditorLady Gaia Prophet Sample Editor

Man kennt das: Da hat man einen tollen Sampler oder Synthesizer, der Samplen kann und es ist auch möglich alles zu ändern, aber es fehlt ein einfaches Tool, um eben ein paar Samples en Bloc einzuwerfen und eben mal auf die Tastatur zu verteilen. Deshalb gibt es ein kleines kostenloses Stück Software.

Der Editor ist eigentlich ein simples Mapping Tool. Es zeigt Namen und Zonen grafisch an und man kann per Maus beliebig viele Audiofiles auf das Editor-Fenster ziehen, um eine Tastatur-Zuweisung der Samples zu den Zonen zu erhalten. Dasselbe ist auch mit Anschlagdynamik-Zonen (Velocity Splits) möglich und einfach und übersichtlich herzustellen. Der Sinn von Keymappings und Velocity-Splits ist sicher geläufig. Damit kann man an einem Klavier beispielsweise mehrere Dynamikstufen einzeln samplen und nur einer gewissen Lautstärke zuweisen und im Extremfall faktisch jede Taste einzeln samplen oder Drumsets erstellen oder auch Multisamples, die mehr als ein Sample verwendet, um die Gesamtqualität zu verbessern.

Um es nicht zu langweilig zu machen, lassen sich verschiedene Samples einladen, die abwechselnd gespielt werden. So kann eine Hihat zum Beispiel immer leicht verschieden klingen ohne komplizierte weitere Vorgänge am Synth selbst. Das nennt man das Round-Robin-Verfahren. Solche Samples werden entsprechend „fett“ dargestellt und lassen sich ebenfalls einfach auswählen und per Drag & Drop in das entsprechende Fenster und Tastaturzone ziehen.

Weitere Information

Das Programm gibt es kostenlos bei PXToolkit und ist für MacOS und Windows erhältlich.

Video

1010music Blackbox Touchscreen Sampler Now Available

The Blackbox is a standalone sampler and groovebox that lets you record, save/load, apply effects and edit one-shot samples and beat-sliced loops.… Read More 1010music Blackbox Touchscreen Sampler Now Available

8-Stimmiger Teenage Engineering mit Rick & Morty Sampling-Taschenrechner PO127

TE PO137 Rick and MortyTE PO137 Rick and Morty

Die musikalischen Taschenrechner sind mittlerweile eine ziemlich große Familie geworden, es gibt Sampler, Synthesizer für Drums und immer auch Effekte und einen 16-Step-Sequencer mit dazu. Welche Rolle Rick und Morty dabei spielen, ist nicht wirklich klar, ebenso wenig was genau geboten wird.

Zumindest zum jetzigen Zeitpunkt haben wir folgende Fakten:

Es handelt sich um einen achtstimmigen Sampler, der auch über das eingebaute Mikrofon gefüllt werden kann. Die ersten oberen Zahlentasten adressieren die Stimmen und es gibt dazu ebenso viele Effekte, welche über die unteren Zahlentasten (8-16) zu erreichen sind. Die Tasten selbst adressieren natürlich die 16 Steps für den Sequencer und ermöglichen die klassische TR-artige Rhyhtmusprogrammierung.

Der PO137, so der offizielle Name, kann auch mit Microtonic-Drum Sounds gefüttert werden. Das ist eine Software, die synthetisch Drums erzeugt und das ist für elektronische Drumsounds eine gute Wahl. Das klappte zwar schon bei früheren PO’s, aber es ist ein willkommenes Feature. Auch hier. Der Schwerpunkt ist also Sprachsamples zu machen aber auch Drumsounds.

Was nicht klar zu erkennen ist, ist ob melodien möglich sind und wenn ja – wie sie eingegeben werden. Ob es irgendwann alle hippen Sachen auch als Rechner gibt, weiss man nicht, aber Rock & Morty scheinen aktuell ein gute Geheimtipp zu sein, denn ich selbst bekam den Tipp erst kürzlich, dass es sich lohne da mal reinzuschauen. Es ist ein bisschen wie „Pack Rat“ für Metasonix und andere, so hat man hier so ein bisschen Nerdtum und Fantum zusammen geworfen.

Teenage Engineering work with Rick & Morty creator on Pocket Operator

Synth love is reaching into the world of television. Teenage Engineering’s latest Pocket Operator not only features animated cult hit Rick & Morty, but involves a direct collaboration with that show’s producer.

Oh yeah, and I guess Justin Roiland kind of gets an edge on the rest of us in that he has an Emmy Award and we don’t. (Not yet. Hmmm… maybe Bastl Instruments and I will make a wacky sitcom set in a Czech village.)

From the description, it’s a little unclear what the PO-137 actually is, other than limited edition with various TV tie-ins. Yes, there are Rick & Morty animations added to the graphics. And yes, you get some custom samples voiced by Roiland himself. (You can hear some of those on the TE preview site.)

But I think it’s a safe bet that the PO-137 is really a re-skin of the PO-35 Speak. Both have “8 vocal characters,” but now those characters come from Rick & Morty. So look to the Speak specs for an idea of what’s in store:

vocal synthesizer and sequencer with built-in microphone for 8 different voice character sampling.

microphone for sampling
120 seconds sample memory
8 voice characters
8 effects
transpose and change scale
replaceable drum sounds with microtonic (sold separately)

This reminds me a bit of when KORG unveiled their OK Go edition volca sample. But Rick & Morty’s rabid fanbase seem to make for a sure-fire hit.

Personally, I don’t want any of your cheap merch, and I can’t really get into Rick & Morty paraphernalia. I just want you to give me a damned portal gun. Now that’s something I’ll invest in.

Also, side note, missed opportunity here – what someone really needs to create is BMO from Adventure Time. I guess we just have to wait and see how Playdate works out.

I’m just going to ponder what the most obscure cartoon partnership we can imagine for MeeBlip. So, Fyodor Khitruk isn’t alive any more, but maybe, like, one of his animators? (Винни-Пух for Eurorack!) How about a Hedgehog in the Fog ambient synth?

I’m sorry, this was supposed to be a news story or something. Please, go on about your day. Спасибо и спокойной ночи.

Preorders in July; shipping in November. The Pocket Operator… Винни-Пух synth I can’t answer.

https://teenage.engineering/

The post Teenage Engineering work with Rick & Morty creator on Pocket Operator appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.