MakeMusic releases Finale 26 music notation software

MakeMusic Finale 26MakeMusic has released version 26 of its Finale music notation software for Windows and Mac. The update comes with various time saving improvements, from automatically stacking articulations and avoiding collisions with slurs, to expediting the entry of chord symbols and expressions. When deadlines loom and there’s no room for mistakes, music professionals choose Finale. Continually […]

Novation bringt endlich neues Remote SLMk3 mit CV, Sequencer etc.

Novation Remote SLMkIIINovation Remote SLMkIII

Novation starteten ihr Remote SL als Luxuscontroller mit Display für lange Reihen. Es wurde einiges geändert und auch links und rechts geguckt, heraus kommt das Novation Remote SLMk3.

Optisch erinnert das Novation Remote SLMk3 stark an Controller von Native Instruments. Es gibt Splitzonen, einen Sequencer mit 8 Spuren, Arpeggiator, bunte Pads, diverse Skalierungen und natürlich Parametersteuerung von Synthesizern und DAW. Direkt unterstützt werden Ableton Live, Logic, Reason und HUI für „den Rest“. Außerdem löst sich Novation von Automap.

Novation Remote SLMk3 – viel Neues mit dabei

In live kann man natürlich Clips starten und hat insgesamt die beste Unterstützung für die spezielleren Funktionen der DAW selbst. Mutes, Mixer und Co. werden hier voll bedient mit Namen der Spuren etc. In Logic und Reason wird dazu ein Skript gebaut, was genau damit gesteuert wird, wird allerdings nicht klar gesagt. Es ist aber klar, dass diese eine besondere Behandlung bekommen, bei Reason sollen die Parameternamen dynamisch eingeblendet werden.

Drei Fußschweller/schalter-Anschlüsse und zwei Sets von CV, Gate und Mod (frei) passen hervorragend in die analoge und digitale Zeit. Der Sequencer ist vergleichbar mit der Circuit-Serie mit 8 Patterns pro Track mit je 16 Steps (128 Steps). Mit den LEDs an jeder Taste kann man Akkorde und Arpeggios genauer verfolgen, Tastaturzonen bilden und über die Farben jeweils Funktionen zuweisen. Die Pads sind druckempfindlich und haben eine Anschlagdynamik.

Die obere Ebene im SLMk3 sind Sessions, von denen es 64 gibt. Sie enthalten jeweils 8 Spuren mit 8 Patterns. Die können übers Netz oder mit einer eigenen Software gesichert und zurückgeladen werden. Je 16 Controller mit 8 Fadern und je 16 Pads gehören in ein Set. Als Controller sind auch NRPN-Typen erlaubt. Über SysEx gibt es keine Aussage. Es gibt aber Templates für gängige Synthesizer von Prophet 6 über Octatrack mk2 bis Microkorg.

Es gibt Varianten mit 49 und 61 Tasten. Novation wirbt besonders mit der Split-Zonen Funktion, die andere nicht haben. Dazu mit einem eigenen Mapping und auch damit, dass Sequencer und Arpeggiator gleichzeitig nutzbar sind und natürlich auch mit der Anwesenheit von CV/Gate Ports.

Die Optik der Bedienelemente für die Displays erinnern an Push, die Displays und Anordnung an NI, die Pads eher an das Launch Pad und es gibt eine schöne große Transport-Tasten-Zeile. Der Preis für die kleinere Version ist 599,– Euro, während die 61 Tasten 699,– Euro kosten aollen.

Infos

Die offizielle Produktwebsite ist diese.

Sound Forge Pro 12 Advanced Audio Waveform Editor 20% OFF!

Magix Sound Forge Pro 12 SaleMagix has launched a sale on Sound Forge Pro 12, the advanced audio waveform editor for Windows. SOUND FORGE Pro is back and it’s better than ever. It has always been an incredible tool for recording, editing and processing audio at the highest possible standard. Thanks to its multi-channel recording, intuitive workflow, extremely powerful editing […]

Control all of Ableton from iOS, Android, Windows: touchAble Pro

Ableton Live: lug along hardware, or … be forced to use a mouse or touchpad. No more: touchAble Pro continues to unlock more and more of Live’s functionality, and now it’s available across touch platforms – iOS, Android, Windows.

That last bit in itself is already news. iPad owners have had plenty of great stuff, but … what if you’ve got an Android phone instead of an iPhone? Or a Microsoft Surface? Or what if you want controls to jam on a big touchscreen display – in the studio, for instance?

It’s possible to target all three of those platforms; the fact many developers haven’t tells you they haven’t yet figured out the business case. But with Ableton Live a massive platform, numbering millions of active users, and use cases that focus on making things happen, uh, “live,” the touchAble devs could have a winner.

And whichever platform you choose, there’s simply no way to put this much control of Ableton Live at your fingertips, with this much visual feedback. We covered this release in full earlier:

touchAble Pro for Ableton Live: touch control on iOS, Android, Windows

But here’s a recap of why it’s cool, whether you’re a returning user or new to the platform:

Piano Roll editing (top), and custom Devices (bottom).

New:

  • Audio clip view with waveforms, including side-by-side waveforms
  • Piano roll view for pattern editing
  • Draw and edit automation
  • Track I/O
  • Custom layouts with Template Editor
  • Custom Device templates (even with third-party plug-ins and Max for Live, via an In-App Purchase coming soon)

And this matters. Now you can quickly whip up a custom template that shows you just what you need to see for a live performance – without squinting (it’s all scalable). Add in side-by-side waveforms to that, and you could twist Live into a DJ tool – or certainly a more flexible live performance tool, especially if you’ve got other instruments or vocals to focus on.

Plus a lot of other good stuff:

Transport, metronome, cues, and quantization
Clips and scenes and control looping
Arm, mute, and solo tracks
Adjust monitoring
Mix, pan, crossfade, and control sends and returns
Play instruments with grid or piano-style layouts, with scales, note repeat, aftertouch, and velocity (based on finger position)
Control device parameters, using faders or assignable X/Y pad modules
X/Y Pad: assign physics, make and morph snapshots or record full gestures,
Navigate Live’s Browser, and drag and drop Devices or Samples to the set

Enlarge stuff – like this clip overview – and make the custom layout you need.

Side by side waveforms, and a bunch of clip options. Oh yeah.

Touch on Windows isn’t just about devices like Surface – it’s also big touch-equipped displays, so ideal for studio work.

Three new videos are out now to walk you through how it’s all working.

More:
http://www.touch-able.com

The post Control all of Ableton from iOS, Android, Windows: touchAble Pro appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Melodyne 4.2 offers tighter integration with Logic Pro X 10.4.2

Celemony ARA Melodyne LogicCelemony has announced Melodyne 4.2, the latest version of its which introduces tighter integration with Logic Pro X 10.4.2. With both apps using ARA technology, Melodyne can be used more seamlessly as part of the Logic workflow. Numerous other details have also been improved (also for other ARA and non-ARA DAWs), so the free update […]

Apple updates Logic Pro X to v10.4.2

Logic Pro XApple has updated its Logic Pro X music production application for Mac. Version 10.4.2 of Logic Pro X comes with support for external storage of the Sound Library, Smart Tempo with multi-track recordings, Alchemy improvements and more. Logic Pro X is the most advanced version of Logic ever. Sophisticated tools for professional songwriting, editing, and […]

Free pack of sounds from the Polish Radio Experimental Studio

Think of it as the BBC Radiophonic Workshop of the east: the Polish Radio Experimental Studio produced unparalleled electronic sounds and inventions for decades. Recognition of those accomplishments is growing – and now Ableton are collaborating to produce a free pack of sounds and tell the PRES story.

Vital stats on this project:

Who’s behind this: Poland’s national cultural institution Instytut Adama Mickiewicza (IAM) commissioned the library from Ableton and contributors.

Where do the sounds come from: Works made at the studio by composers Krzysztof Knittel, Elżbieta Sikora, and Ryszard Szeremeta, 1970s-80s, comprise the original sound material.

Who built the pack: Project coordinator Michal Mendyk worked with Ableton Certified Trainer Marcin Staniszewski.

What’s in there: 300 sounds, loops, and effects organized into Drum Racks, plus custom Effect Racks, all pre-mapped with macros (making them easy to use with Push or other controllers)

Check out the pack and a full article on the studio and its history at Ableton’s site (plus more on Marcin Staniszewski and his music):

Sounds from the Polish Radio Experimental Studio

Lots more links there, but the history to me is the most compelling. Paralleling the hot-and-cold relationships of experimental sound and music technology in East Germany and the Soviet Union in the same period, there was a precarious relationship of electronic sound to the government in Communist Poland. Michal Mendyk tells the story of studio founder Józef Patkowski to Ableton:

Paradoxically, a couple of years earlier, it was Sokorski who introduced social realism and radical political and aesthetical censorship in Polish art and culture. He was famous for having said about Witold Lutosławski, one of the leaders of Polish music vanguard that “he should be thrown under a tram”. So, in 1957 the same guy was responsible for creating the most experimental music centre in the whole Eastern Europe! He later said that Polish Radio Experimental Studio was his way to redeem his previous sins. This is one of many example of how paradoxical cultural and intellectual life in an authoritarian system can be.

Here’s a great documentary on the studio:

And for an imaginative take on the studio’s work, see our previous story:

The retro-futuristic Apparatum draws from Polish electronic music history

Plus more on the ongoing legacy in Poland:

This 1971 Dancing Rectangle from Poland Predicts Modern Techno, AV

Live techno after Polish punk and communism: Dyktando of Brutaż

The post Free pack of sounds from the Polish Radio Experimental Studio appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Logic Pro 10.4.2, MainStage 3.4: why you’ll want to update now

The new Logic adds multi-track Smart Tempo, and sorely needed external storage of sounds, among other improvements – and live performance-friendly MainStage syncs up with Logic’s latest instruments, effects, and features.

Note that Mojave actually isn’t specifically mentioned in these updates – but pro audio users will, as always, want to move nice and slow with major OS updates to let hardware and software developers catch up and find any issues.

But existing Logic users should grab this one. Here’s the big one: if you’re running Logic on a machine that’s low on hard disk space (raises hand), you can now move your Logic Sound Library to an external storage device. So while 10.4 did add improvements for choosing what to install and what not to install, this is … possibly even better, because you can just buy a big, cheap drive and not sweat it at all.

Smart Tempo was a fascinating idea in 10.4, but now it’s actually fleshed out – so multi-track recordings, MIDI data, and imported stems now can all work with flexible time, without a metronome. (That is, they can both be a source or a target.)

Another overdue but important improvement: automation points can align vertically.

None of that will make you more creative, but Alchemy could. It’s an instrument that’s one of the best reasons to use Logic at the moment, even if we’re all sad it’s no longer a plug-in. And if you weren’t already importing audio into its powerful engine, now’s a good time to start, with a workflow that lets you choose how the engine will play that audio right as you drag it in.

The word from Apple:

• The Sound Library can be relocated to an external storage device
• Smart Tempo can analyze tempo data across multi-track recordings to define the Project Tempo
• Imported multi-track stems can follow or define Project Tempo
• Smart Tempo now analyzes the tempo of MIDI performances recorded without a metronome
• Alchemy provides drag and drop hot zones that let you select re-synthesis and sampling options while importing audio
• Alchemy allows numerical editing of parameter values
• Dragging one automation point over another now aligns them vertically
• New mixer mode allows channel strip fader and pan controls to be used to set send level and pan
• Automatic Slurs can be applied to selected notes in the Score Editor
• Add a photo to track or project notes to help remember key session details or studio hardware settings
• This update also contains numerous stability and performance improvements

Now we’re just waiting on a release that finally cleans up some of the older effects and instruments in Logic’s library – one by one, we’re getting there. (Sculpture and Space Designer gladly got a big refresh in 10.4!)

MainStage

MainStage now syncs up with the latest Logic, though it’s a shame these releases are not in (word of the week) “lockstep.”

So the following list is so long for MainStage because it’s partly catch-up with Logic 10.4’s various additions. That is a big deal for MainStage, because 10.4 included a bunch of effects and instruments.

This also means MainStage could be a go-to if you just want to jam with those toys and don’t care particularly about Logic – or, for that matter, even a DAW, period.

The “3.4” version number gives you a clue that this is the bigger of these updates:

General
• Channel Strip MIDI input inspector allows any MIDI CC data to be filtered, transformed or passed through
• Text notes can be added to the bottom of channel strips
• The Metronome is now fully configurable, with separate settings for Bar, Group, Beat, and Division
• This update also contains numerous stability and performance improvements

Sound Library
• The Sound Library can be relocated to an external storage device
• 2 vintage brush kits for Drum Kit Designer
• More than 800 new loops in a variety of instruments and genres
• New Visions library for Alchemy adds 150 cinematic presets

Plug-Ins
• ChromaVerb is a sophisticated new algorithmic reverb with a colorful, interactive interface for creating rich acoustic spaces
• Space Designer offers a new design and a scalable, Retina interface
• Step FX adds rhythmic multi-effect processing using 3 powerful step sequencers and an X/Y pad
• Phat FX makes your tracks bigger and bolder using 9 effects that add warmth and punch to your sounds
• The Vintage EQ Collection provides 3 accurate models of vintage analog EQs from the 1950s to the 1970s
• Studio Strings and Studio Horns are deeply sampled, realistic ensemble instruments with custom articulation controls
• Mellotron is now available as a standalone instrument plug-in
• Retro Synth now offers 18 different filter models
• The length of individual steps in the Arpeggiator plug-in are adjustable
• Loopback now applies a small crossfade at each loop cycle to reduce the likelihood of clicks or other audio artifacts

Alchemy
• Alchemy provides drag and drop hot zones that let you select re-synthesis and sampling options while importing audio
• Alchemy allows numerical editing of parameter values
• Alchemy adds 12 new synthesized formant filter shapes
• Alchemy now offers a side chain input that can be used as a source for envelope followers
• Alchemy includes an automatic time align feature for improved morphing
• New additive effects in Alchemy expand the options for filtering and modulating sound

Previously:

Logic Pro X 10.4: New effects, and play and mix audio without a click

The post Logic Pro 10.4.2, MainStage 3.4: why you’ll want to update now appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

FL Studio gets Akai Fire, and it’s serious about step sequencing

As the Akai APC40 was to Ableton Live, so the Akai Fire hardware controller is to FL Studio. It looks like the step sequencing grid you see when you open FL, and it was created in collaboration with Image-Line. So can it bring something new to the integrated controller world?

Okay, so the pitch here is easy: yes, you can use any number of controllers with FL Studio. But first-time users may want an integrated package, and dedicated hardware can be pre-mapped to do useful stuff.

Price: US$199.

What you get from the Fire is a big grid of buttons, four encoders, and then a whole bunch of triggers including transport and other functions. It’s clearly descended from Akai’s own APC and Novation Launchpad (the latter still features in product images for FL software). The difference: more triggers for software functions, and the grid is 16×4 instead of 8×8.

Shifting from 8×8 to 16×4, though, makes a real difference in workflow. It mirrors the iconic step sequencer that has always popped up first when you load FL Studio (back to the first Fruity Loops), and it makes programming rhythms easier, since you can see a whole bar’s worth of sixteenth notes.

And Akai are positioning this with trap and hip-hop in mind. That makes sense, as those music styles – both in terms of listeners and producers – are growing fast.

What you don’t get, though, is velocity sensitivity, as on the MPC (original and current) and rivals like Maschine. So instead of playing in those velocities, you’ll dial them in with encoders. But while Akai is the brand that popularized that way of working, it does seem that programming in rhythms fits the FL ethos.

$199 buys you a lot of power, though, not only because of the shortcut triggers but also the inclusion of the OLED display – those these little OLEDs currently showing up on entry-level hardware will require a bit of squinting.

What can you actually control, apart from obviously that step sequencer?

Load/audition sounds. Plug-ins and even project files are accessible from the browser.

Step sequencer. Since this can be combined with samples and you can, for instance, dial in pitch changes and the like (see videos), this does look fun.

Trigger patterns, performances. Hardcore FL users have hacked live rigs for a while this way; now you get hardware that can do it out of the box. Performance mode can trigger both patterns and audio. So yeah – this is absolutely an alternative to Ableton Live.

One-touch mute/solo. Okay, no volume faders (Fire alongside a Novation LaunchControl XL, for instance, would be killer), but one-touch mute/solo is also essential for live jams.

Note mode, drum mode. Yes, you can also use those buttons for pitch and drums, even mapping the first 4×4 grid MPC-style to FPC and SliceX.

Transport, record. Countdown, wait, and metronome settings are also friendly to doing takes.

Parameter control. The four encoders also map to both device parameters and channel and mixer settings.

And if you’re really crazy, Akai wants to let you know you can connect up to four Fires at once.

More detail in the videos (selected – they just dumped a bunch)):

https://fire.akaipro.com/

The post FL Studio gets Akai Fire, and it’s serious about step sequencing appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Add your entire sample library to Loopcloud 3.0 and rediscover your sounds

Loopcloud 3 availableLoopmasters has announced availability of Loopcloud 3.0, a major update to the free cloud-connected application for browsing, streaming and importing your samples, loops and sounds effortlessly into your DAW. With version 3.0 you can now add your entire sample library to Loopcloud and rediscover your sounds. Integrate, access and audition all your sounds like never […]