If you’ve got $7500, you can also have an E-mu SP-1200 sampler remake

Also new in 2020 – a remake of the legendary 1987 E-mu SP-1200. Just get ready for some sticker shock, because it’s not just a clone, it’s an actual SP-1200, rebuilt.

This one is an extremely, extremely limited edition because it starts with an original working SP-1200. So the price tag is similar to a top-condition refurbished 1200 because that is literally what it is. The new SP-1200 undertaking comes from E-mu Systems co-founder Dave Rossum, so we can think of this as passion project more than anything.

Rossum Electro-Music calls it “better-than-new.”

Starting with an original SP-1200 and upgrading and calibrating it, you get (copy-pasting here):

  • A new 3.5″ disk drive (seriously), plus an SD card floppy emulator integrated with the software (by Dave himself, no less).
  • Manual filter cutoff frequency control sliders for the SSM 2044 analog filters for channels 1 and 2 added to the rear panel
  • A new metal chassis
  • A new panel overlay
  • The top shell restored and painted “SP Grey.”
  • A new power supply with locking connector (and cool operation)
  • A new LCD display with adjustable brightness and a selectable red, blue, or green color LED backlight
  • All new play buttons
  • All new programming buttons
  • All new 1/4” and MIDI jacks
  • All electrolytic and tantalum capacitors replaced with high-reliability ceramic or aluminum-poly caps
  • All rotary potentiometers replaced with million cycle lifetime pots and installed with new knurled black metal knobs
  • All slide potentiometers replaced with 200,000 cycle lifetime sliders and installed with new slider knobs
  • All original trimmers replaced with 20-turn versions and precisely calibrated
  • New rubber feet
  • An individualized Dave Rossum signature plaque
  • A dust-proof, crush-proof, lockable Pelican™ brand case with press-and pull latches, wheels, and an extendable handle.
  • Full testing and calibration by Rossum Electro-Music

Yes, there’s a wait list. So Dr. Dre, if you’re reading, go get on it.

I’m lost, to be honest, so coming soon to CDM, I’m proud to launch a new feature: a round-up of what legendary classic gear isn’t being cloned/remade/rebooted.

Actually, if I wait a few days even that story may be unnecessary.

Also, anyone want to take bets on when we get a Behringer BS-1200? (for “Behringer Sampler,” you know…)

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The E-mu SP-1200 sampler is getting a reboot: SP 2400

It’s meant as a “spiritual successor,” say the creators – with both emulation of the classic E-mu sound and new features. But the SP 2400 in preorder still hope to bank off the renown of one of the most popular samplers ever, the genre-defining E-mu SP-1200.

All of this could be a test of the clone craze. Sure, 12-bit lo-fi sound has some real potential for music making. And the E-mu layout, with faders and pads, is accessible.

But at US$949, and only a preorder shipping some time in the winter, the SP 2400 isn’t the most practical choice. You’ve now got plenty of options from KORG, Elektron, Roland (including their wildly popular TR-8S), and even smaller makers like MFB for a grand or less – some of them a fraction of this cost. All of those can be had right now, without dropping hundreds of bucks in June to get something that could take until January or longer. Not to mention we may see a Behringer take on this idea shortly, knowing how that company follows social media.

In a way, then, these sorts of reboots are beginning to become like the remakes of classic cars – a sort of genre all their own. There’s a price premium and a practicality cost, but if you want something that looks like a classic with some upgraded innards beneath, you’ve got options.

That said, there’s a nice feature set here. I like the idea of the 12-bit/26k mode, though I wonder if they’ve recreated the signature filter sound of the E-mu. And while I’m a bit too skeptical to endorse dropping cash just for half a year of “bi-weekly progress reports … via this website, social media channels, and emails,” it could be worth a look when it arrives.

The real draw here is probably that this actually samples – including a looper mode. That’s a feature missing on a lot of current gear.

It’s the creation of ISLA Instruments, who also made the KordBot. I’m curious how people fared with that crowdfunding project and the final result, which would be a great indicator of how to take this one.

I just hope that new ideas get as much attention as reboots of old ones. Heck, I feel that way about TV and movies. It’s obviously summer.

But here are those admittedly rather appealing specs –

• Sturdy 4-piece Steel/Aluminium enclosure.
• Mains Powered 100-250V AC.
• Dual Audio Engine:
12-Bit/26.04khz Lo-Fi Engine (Classic SP Sound) and 24-Bit/48khz Hi-Fi Engine
• Stereo Recording/Playback.
• Channels 1-8 Pannable to Main out L/R Channels 7+8 can be ‘linked’ to support stereo audio content.
• Headphone Output (9-10) w/independant monitoring of channels.
• Dedicated Microphone Pre-Amp.
• Looper Pedal Mode (with full duplex recording/playback).
• Record and overdub live audio during playback.
• USB Host & Device Ports:
Connect usb thumb drives, keyboards, midi controllers directly into the SP2400.

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Grab Free Drum Kits for Ableton Live and Other Tools: Vintage, Vinyl, Synth, Pine Cone

drummachines

Sometimes, it takes just that one set of sounds to unfreeze your creativity and get a song started. And that’s why freebies are sometimes such fun: they’re even a bit more odd, a handful of offbeat sounds that just begs to be turned into … something.

The folks at Puremagnetik have been posting some gems to their Tumblr account. This just in: “Wicked Kits” is a collection of five drum kits pre-configured for Ableton Live. (As with any Live kit, there are raw samples you can use in any tool you like – Renoise, MPC, whatever.)

The emphasis here is definitely vintage, dirty, and weirdo synth-y – they’ve sampled some classic drum machines, synths, and vinyl to built the set. 808 and SP-1200 figure prominently.

Analog Bully is some out-there retro synthesized beatmaking goodness. Drty Brty, Dope Loafa, and Kid Glitch are grimy and ready to play. And Grinder Kit combines a bass with a drum kit (though breaking them out is also a decent idea). They’re all a bit crazy on the effects, so I started by turning most of the macro knobs down. (And yes, sometimes there’s more than one delay, with one delay labeled something other than delay, so watch out for that.)

Must-download, though:
Wicked Kits – 5 Free Drum Kits for Ableton Live

For more organic sounds – literally – look no further than their “Pine Percussion,” beautiful, woody sounds perfect for some experimental dance music or cinematic applications or other notions. The backstory:

A kit of percussion recorded in the hills of Israel’s Carmel region. While meandering through this fire destroyed forest, I came across a number of fallen trees, many with crispy blackened pinecones and brittle branches still in tact.

This Free Ableton Live Pack includes an assortment of these sounds all programmed into Drum Racks – optimized for (but not limited to) Push integration. Enjoy!

Pine Percussion

For previous Create Tree Music action:

Music for Plants, Music by Plants, in Two Eco-Themed Album Releases [Listen, Galleries]

Follow these folks on their Tumblr “log”:

http://puremagnetik.com/tagged/log

Lots of other stuff there from travels abroad, including a prepared piano and whales. I like that idea – I might have to start sampling everywhere I go, too.

The post Grab Free Drum Kits for Ableton Live and Other Tools: Vintage, Vinyl, Synth, Pine Cone appeared first on Create Digital Music.

808, SP1200, MPC, NS-10 Reborn in Miniature as Beautifully-Detailed, Tiny USB Drives [Gallery]

File these designs under “do want.” Some of your favorite gear is rendered in miniature: Roland’s TR-808, E-MU’s SP-1200 sampler, Akai’s MPC 2000XL, and (coming soon) even the Yamaha NS-10 near-field monitors. It occurs to me that someday soon, such tiny things might even work in some form as functioning music equipment. For now, you’ll have to settle for tiny classic gear that contains an 8 GB flash drive – enough to carry especially-precious samples or demos or backups.

The drives are US$39.99, but contain extraordinary levels of detail and use Toshiba flash memory (not something overly generic). They work with USB 2.0, too.

The project is the work of Alkota, a musician who also offers a boutique of drum samples, including some more unique hip-hop drum sets and such. Shop:
http://hiphopdrumsamples.com/category/flash-drives

Gallery:

More on the artist:
www.alkotabeats.com
www.hiphopdrumsamples.com
www.twitter.com/alkota