Here are some of the weirdest musical instrument ideas from NAMM

Trade shows can be a strenuous onslaught of noise, cost, and crowds – but then it’s often the weirdest stuff that makes it worth it. And no one finds strange quite like Barry Wood and his annual NAMM Oddities.

Barry impressively tracks every kind of freakish appearance at the enormous US music instruments show, and it’s worth digging through his whole NAMM Oddities guide category by category ($1.2 million-dollar guitar straps and all). I’ve taken the liberty of picking some of my favorites from this year’s haul. Some of it is genuinely useful and cool – some will just make you shake your head and mumble, say wha?

One Synclavier knob. Built-to-order, $399 – half of which you owe as a deposit. This is evidently for people who are esoteric rich people, but with a fraction of the money of really rich crazy people. They … I don’t want to use the word “explain” as that would imply I understand who this is for, but they describe how this four hundred dollar knob is historically accurate:

The weight and feel of the knob are identical, as we have used the exact measurements and a balanced spring arrangement. The two-inch diameter knob is milled from a solid bar of instrument-grade aluminium (yes, we were doing this long before Apple). The interface software and hysteresis algorithm are taken from Synclavier II.

Full hammer action, in any quantity of keys. This is actually a great idea – Piano de Voyage is a hammer action keyboard broken into modules. Want just 2 octaves? Get just one module. (I always wondered why people want a full 88 keys in electronic contexts, actually.) Or if you do want as many as 8 octaves, you can break down the modules so they fit in a bag – unlike a usual full keyboard. No word on pricing or availability, but there’s a sign-up. https://pianodevoyage.com/

https://www.synclavier.com/product/synclavier-knob/

A food pedal that looks like it was prototyped in Play-Doh. Effigy Labs Control pedal is what it’s called, and the makers promise unique expression in a foot controller. (This was evidently a big hit at the show, too!)

https://effigylabs.com/effigy-home-page

Color sensing rings. Sphero Specdrums are wireless, optical, color sensing rings. (The idea of having musical rings just keeps coming.)

Giant panda piano. The piano section at NAMM and Germany’s Musikmesse always has something unusual, but this Seiler upright – out there. And if you figured something weird and panda-related came out of Asia, you’d be wrong – Seiler started in Germany, is now a US brand, and recently was bought by Nashville’s Samick Music Corporation.

Remember, never say no to panda.

A light-up uke. Solo Music‘s Lighted Ukulele should qualify as this year’s strangest use of RGB LEDs (though I know given what controllers look like these days, we can’t really make fun of ukelele players).

Brass knuckle mic accessory. Signs you may want to talk to your booking agent about the quality of your venues. Someone at Metaldozer had ideas about what to do with the metalworking.

And basically everything from Game Changer Audio. Need a sound source that’s got spinning discs with optical sensors and electromagnetic pickups? Or 3000 volts of plasma for distortion? Game Changer is all over new ideas; we’ll have reviews of their stuff soon.

https://www.gamechangeraudio.com/

Sonic State takes a look:

— and Gearnews.com did a nice writeup.

Plenty more where these came from – do check them out:

https://otheroom.com/namm/

And you’ll get loads more bizarre finds on Barry’s Facebook page, like… whatever this is:

The post Here are some of the weirdest musical instrument ideas from NAMM appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Synclavier brings its FM & Additive synthesis to iOS with Go! and Pocket! apps

Synclavier Go

Synclavier Digital has announced the release of Synclavier Go!, placing a re-creation of the seminal Synclavier II Digital Synthesizer’s sound engine into the hands of iPad owners. Additive FM Synthesis was never more fun. The intuitive touch-screen interface is a joy to use. It’s a snip to transform simple sine waves into grungy brass attacks, […]

The post Synclavier brings its FM & Additive synthesis to iOS with Go! and Pocket! apps appeared first on rekkerd.org.

Synclavier Go! and Synclavier Pocket! for iOS Released

You can find some demos in the archives. The press release:

NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA: having turned heads and opened ears with a show-stopping showcase at The 2019 NAMM Show in Southern California, January 24-27, newly-formed Synclavier Digital is proud to announce availability of Synclavier Go! and Synclavier Pocket! — placing a re-creation of the seminal Synclavier® II Digital Synthesizer’s sound

SYNCLAVIER – TIMBRE DISK 1 REV 6

Published on Feb 23, 2019 100 Things I Do

“I keep being asked to do more Synclavier Videos so I thought this week I would take a look at some of the Timbre’s from the Rev 6 Disk#1 Library!”

NAMM 2019: Synclavier App

Published on Feb 7, 2019 Volterock Review

Synclavier Go!

Synclavier Go! Tutorial – iPad

Published on Jan 31, 2019 redskylullaby

“Tutorial of basic functions and sound design with Synclavier Go! the iPad version of the Synclavier synth by New England Digital.

0.30 Sound Architecture
1.01 Harmonic Envelope, Additive Synth and Frames
2.24 Loading Partial Timbres
3.09 Expression, Pitch, Vol and Pan Modulation
5.30 Partial Copy/Paste
5.45 Volume, FM and Intonation Panel
6.15 FM

Synclavier Go! – iOS App Review – Midiverse – TV

Published on Jan 29, 2019 Midiverse – TV

“What’s up everybody? Welcome to Midiverse – TV. On this episode we’re going to be checking out a new iOS application, Synclavier Go!”

Synclavier Go!

Published on Jan 27, 2019 100 Things I Do

“I thought we would take a look at the new Synclavier Go from Cameron Jones (co-creator of the original Synclavier). Cameron is still cutting code to this day and his latest iteration of the Synclavier sounds excellent. I have a look at some of the Timbre’s (presets), it seems like most of the factory disks are included! I might have a look at Timbre

NAMM Leaks: The Synclavier is Coming to the iPad w/ Physical Knob Controller

Spotted this one on Synthtopia

“Synclavier Go! (for iPad) and Synclavier Pocket! (for iPhone and iPod Touch) re-create the original Synclavier II FM Synthesis engine, with a touch-screen interface inspired by the original hardware. The Synclavier DSP Engine – used by Arturia in its Synclavier V product line – is a faithful recreation of the FM- and Additive-Synthesis functions of the original

New toy November 2018

Published on Nov 15, 2018 SynthMania

“I’ve wanted a NED Synclavier for years and really wanted to get one by my 50th b-day. Finally recently got a Synclavier (PSMT, the mainframe is out of picture) with seven months to spare 🙂 Now I’m lucky to own *the* three classic high-end digital keyboards of the ’80s: the Fairlight, the K250, and the Synclavier.”


Interesting that the audio outs on