Moog Theremini: Theremin Session #9

Published on Nov 22, 2015 carolinaeyckvideos

“This week testing the Theremini by Moog (with Firmware Update 1.1.0)”

Check out Carolina Eyck as a small kid with Bob Moog here.

Midnight Improvisation: Theremin Session

Tweet This week playing an improvisation together with Marius Leicht. Check out another improvisation we played on Marius’ channel: Using the following instruments: Moog Prodigy (1980) with Roland Space Echo (produced 1973-1988) Sequential Circuits Prophet 5 Rev 3.3 (1982) with Strymon Timeline (2014) dTape Maschine and Moog MP-201 pedal controlling the filter cutoff frequency Moog […]

Miss American Vampire

Miss American Vampire by Victoria Lundy

“Disturbing mood pieces, melodic theremin, and gothic horror.
released October 31, 2015

1 Demon on your chest
2 Kojo no Tsuki
3 Maria Callas has been brought back to an unnatural life
4 Solar wind reveals ghosts
5 A bad day at Carlsbad Caverns
6 Miss American Vampire

All songs written, arranged, performed and recorded by Victoria Lundy

Electric Dream: Twelve Instruments ⚡︎ One Girl

Published on Oct 26, 2015 Clara Venice

“‘Electric Dream’ now available on iTunes ⚡︎


Go behind the scenes with me at the National Music Centre as I record my newest EP, “Electric Dream” using some rare electronic instruments from their collection (and one not-so-rare instrument from mine!)


Instruments used:

1. Chime-a-tron
2. Linn LM-1
3. Oberheim Four Voice

Watch Bob Moog play and talk about the Theremin

It’s the instrument that was the first real electronic music product. And it’s the reason we even know the name Bob Moog – as it inspired Moog to go into electronics and the sale of electronic musical instruments.

So, when the Theremin is the subject of a video by Bob Moog himself, it’s a big deal. You’ll have to settle for early-90s video quality, but you’ll be treated to the dulcet tones of Dr. Moog’s New York baritone narration of Theremin history, followed by an enchanting and pretty-darn-technically-good performance on the Russian electronic invention.

Thanks to Chris Stack and experimentalsynth for sending this along. Chris writes:

Many years before going to work for Moog Music as marketing manager I was a printed circuit board designer. I met Bob Moog in Asheville and wound up doing the PCB design work on his Multi-Touch Keyboard project. Around this time, Bob hosted a presentation called “New Vistas 91”, a look at some then current happenings in avant garde electronic music.

Bob was gracious enough to let me record the presentation on my then new Video 8 camera. The tape was lost for decades, but recently found and digitized. Unfortunately the audio and video quality is not great, but I feel this is very interesting from a historical perspective, and I offer it as such.


Chris Stack

That PCB itself is an interesting story, but I’ll save that – and some of what Chris is up to musically – for another day.

Here via the Moog Foundation (and Moog Music) are early and later images of Dr. Moog at the instrument that changed not just history, but his history.



Bob playing theremin '52_1

The post Watch Bob Moog play and talk about the Theremin appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Bob Moog Theremin Demo & Performance

Published on Oct 22, 2015 experimentalsynth

“Many years before going to work for Moog Music as marketing manager I was a printed circuit board designer. I met Bob Moog in Asheville and wound up doing the PCB design work on his Multi-Touch Keyboard project. Around this time, Bob hosted a presentation called ‘New Vistas 91’, a look at some then current happenings in avant garde electronic music.

Canon For Theremin & LoopStation

Sunday Synth Jam: Carolina Eyck is one of the world’s foremost theremin virtuosi, performing with orchestras around the world. She’s also created an excellent series of performance and educational videos. In this video, the second in her ‘Theremin Session’ series, Eyck … Continue reading

Carolina Eyck – ‘Elephant in Green’

Sunday Synth Jam: This video captures an encore performance by thereminist Carolina Eyck.  Eyck plays Elephant in Green, which she prefaces saying ‘Imagine somebody is walking in the middle of nowhere, having some hallucinations.’ Performed live on April 20, 2015 … Continue reading

Read the article Bob Moog wrote when he met Leon Theremin


It’s hard to imagine what the evolution of the synthesizer would have been without Leon Theremin.

For one, it was Theremin’s invention that first captivated Robert Moog. Theremin kits were Dr. Moog’s first product and many would say, his first electronic instrumental love. That impact was significant, too, on a whole generation – actually, even my own father made building a kit Theremin one of his early experiences with electronics.

The fall of the Soviet Union still has ripples felt in the electronic music world today. And surely there’s no more poignant moment in the intertwining of post-Cold War history with musical invention as Leon Theremin’s 1991 visit to the USA – at 95 years of age.

Robert Moog wrote up that experience for Keyboard Magazine (USA), along with writer Olivia Mattis. Much of the history will be familiar, but it’s moving to read about the event.

The gathering with Lev Sergeyevich Termen may have been the single greatest convergence of the 20th century’s electronic inventors ever – John Chowning (CCRMA, FM synthesis), Don Buchla, Roger Linn, Bob Moog, Tom Oberheim, Max Mathews, and Dave Smith were all there. (It’s also remarkable to think how much Chowning, Linn, Oberheim, and Smith continue to contribute as teachers and inventors today, not to mention the ongoing contributions of Moog, Buchla, and Theremin instruments.)

And of course, because of history (hello, KGB), these inventors had never really had the opportunity to meet face to face. They had “met” through their instruments. Moog and Mattis also write eloquently of ghostly guests:

For the audience, the thread of continuity and tradition linking Theremins early instruments with the world of synthesizers and MIDI is clear and strong. If you looked hard, you could almost see the spirits of Maurice Martenot, Friedrich Trautwein (inventor of the Trautonium), and Laurens Hammond joining the audience in frenzied applause.

The Thereminists were notable, too – not only daughter Natasha Termen, but Clara Rockmore, reunited with Mr. Termen. Max played with Natasha, via his “Radio Drum” – a full decade before those sorts of gestural interfaces would enter popular consciousness (via Minority Report, the Wii, Kinect, and so on).

And we get Termen, the ‘cello player turned inventor turned KGB asset, in his own words. On the reason for the instrument:

The idea first came to me right after our Revolution, at the beginning of the Bolshevik state. I wanted to invent some kind of an instrument that would not operate mechanically, as does the piano, or the cello and the violin, whose bow movements can be compared to those of a saw. I conceived of an instrument that would create sound without using any mechanical energy, like the conductor of an orchestra.

I became interested in bringing about progress in music, so that there would be more musical resources, I was not satisfied with the mechanical instruments in existence, of which there were many. They were all built using elementary principles and were not physically well done, I was interested in making a different kind of instrument. And I wanted, of course, to make an apparatus that would be controlled in space, exploiting electrical fields, and that would use little energy. Therefore I used electronic technology to create a musical instrument that would provide greater resources.

And there’s more. There’s a Theremin lesson for Lenin, with whom Termen claimed kindred interests because the Soviet leader was “interested in how the whole world is created.” And there was Albert Einstein – yes, that Albert Einstein – taking up residence in the Termen studio in order to explore visual music and synesthesia:

Einstein was interested in the connection between music and geometrical figures: not only color, but mostly triangles, hexagons, heptagons, different kinds of geometrical figures. He wanted to combine these into drawings. He asked whether he could have a laboratory in a small room in my house, where he could draw.

There are electric cellos made for Stokowski and Varese, and the tale of imprisonment (along with Tupolev) and nightmare suspicion under Stalin, the removal of electronic instruments from the Conservatory in the late 60s because electricity is only “for electrocution.” Well worth reading the piece in its entirety:


But no reason to feel overly nostalgic or lost in the shadow of history. I think what Termen says about music from space and electrical fields is just as evocative today as it was a century ago – to say nothing of an Einsteinian flatland of geometric music. In a reversal of the Yogi Berra quote “the future ain’t what it used to be,” maybe it’s even more.



The post Read the article Bob Moog wrote when he met Leon Theremin appeared first on Create Digital Music.

Rob Schwimmer Performs Erich Korngold’s ‘In Meine Innige Nacht’

Sunday Synth Jam: Rob Schwimmer, of the New York Theremin Society, performs Erich Korngold’s In meine innige Nacht on a Hobbs theremin. Here’s what Schmwimmer has to say about the performance: “I fell in love with this strange and beautiful song by … Continue reading