WARP take over NTS radio with 100 hours of Eno, FlyLo, Autechre…

What better way to celebrate the solstice and Make Music Day / Fête de la Musique than with 100 hours of all the all stars from Warp Records?

There is some serious stuff in this lineup:

  • Boards of Canada’s first public outing since 2013’s Tomorrow’s Harvest album with a mysterious two hour mix.
  • Aphex Twin presents his one off performance from London’s Barbican Hall in 2012.
  • Brian Eno collaborates with Extinction Rebellion for a powerful radio narrative.
  • Brand new live sessions from Mount Kimbie and Bibio.
  • Mixes of previously unheard music from Autechre, Kelela, Hudson Mohawke, Mark Pritchard, Bibio, Lorenzo Senni, Clark, Plaid, Darkstar and DJ Nigga Fox.
  • Exclusive full-length live sets from Oneohtrix Point Never and Kelly Moran.
  • New mixes from Flying Lotus, Nightmares on Wax, Danny Brown, John Stanier (Battles), Chris Taylor (Grizzly Bear), !!!, kwes., GAIKA, LoneLady, Winston Hazel (Forgemasters) and Mira Calix.
  • Live radio shows from the flagship NTS studio in Gillett Square from Squarepusher, Leila and Evian Christ.

And then the guests:

  • An exclusive, extended piece from Death Grips.
  • Mixes from musical pioneers Ryuichi Sakamoto and Adrian Sherwood.
  • A very special mix from Hood By Air’s Shayne Oliver.
  • The Arcola label is represented by Rian Treanor, Bone Head and Primitive Art.
  • Some of Warp’s esteemed visual collaborators also figure prominently, including Weirdcore, Ezra Miller, Hassan Rahim and Tim Saccenti

Full schedule, London time:

Channel 1 – Full Schedule (all times GMT):

Friday 21st June
12.00 – Mark Pritchard
13.00 – Mount Kimbie
13.25 – Bibio
13.36 – Nightmares on Wax
16.00 – Broadcast
17.00 – kwes.
18.00 – Plaid
19.00 – Aphex Twin
19.30 – Death Grips
20.00 – Oneohtrix Point Never
21.40 – Shayne Oliver / HBA
22.00 – Danny Brown
23.00 – Autechre

Saturday 22nd June
00.00 – John Stanier (Battles)
01.00 – !!!
03.00 – Hassan Rahim
04.00 – Tim Saccenti
06.00 – Ezra Miller
07.00 – Broadcast
08.00 – Clark
09.00 – Paul White
10.00 – Lonelady
12.00 – Kelly Moran
13.00 – Bibio
14.00 – Special Request tribute to LFO
16.20 – Adrian Sherwood
17.00 – Leila
18.00 – Hudson Mohawke
19.00 – Bonehead
19.30 – Evian Christ
21.00 – Squarepusher
22.00 – Flying Lotus
23.00 – Ryuichi Sakamoto

Sunday 23rd June
00.00 – Ryuichi Sakamoto
00.30 – Mira Calix
02.30 – Plaid
03.30 – Rian Treanor
04.30 – DJ Nigga Fox
06.00 – Aphex Twin
08.00 – Kelly Moran
09.00 – Primitive Art
10.00 – Lorenzo Senni
11.35 – Weirdcore
12.35 – Bibio
13.00 – Gonjasufi
14.00 – Winston Hazel (Forgemasters)
15.00 – Gaika
16.00 – Extinction Rebellion x Brian Eno
17.00 – Chris Taylor (Grizzly Bear / CANT)
18.45 – Darkstar
20.00 – Kelela
21.00 – Boards of Canada
23.00 – Autechre

Check it:

www.nts.live/WXAXRXP

The post WARP take over NTS radio with 100 hours of Eno, FlyLo, Autechre… appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

WARP take over NTS radio with 100 hours of Eno, FlyLo, Autechre…

What better way to celebrate the solstice and Make Music Day / Fête de la Musique than with 100 hours of all the all stars from Warp Records?

There is some serious stuff in this lineup:

  • Boards of Canada’s first public outing since 2013’s Tomorrow’s Harvest album with a mysterious two hour mix.
  • Aphex Twin presents his one off performance from London’s Barbican Hall in 2012.
  • Brian Eno collaborates with Extinction Rebellion for a powerful radio narrative.
  • Brand new live sessions from Mount Kimbie and Bibio.
  • Mixes of previously unheard music from Autechre, Kelela, Hudson Mohawke, Mark Pritchard, Bibio, Lorenzo Senni, Clark, Plaid, Darkstar and DJ Nigga Fox.
  • Exclusive full-length live sets from Oneohtrix Point Never and Kelly Moran.
  • New mixes from Flying Lotus, Nightmares on Wax, Danny Brown, John Stanier (Battles), Chris Taylor (Grizzly Bear), !!!, kwes., GAIKA, LoneLady, Winston Hazel (Forgemasters) and Mira Calix.
  • Live radio shows from the flagship NTS studio in Gillett Square from Squarepusher, Leila and Evian Christ.

And then the guests:

  • An exclusive, extended piece from Death Grips.
  • Mixes from musical pioneers Ryuichi Sakamoto and Adrian Sherwood.
  • A very special mix from Hood By Air’s Shayne Oliver.
  • The Arcola label is represented by Rian Treanor, Bone Head and Primitive Art.
  • Some of Warp’s esteemed visual collaborators also figure prominently, including Weirdcore, Ezra Miller, Hassan Rahim and Tim Saccenti

Full schedule, London time:

Channel 1 – Full Schedule (all times GMT):

Friday 21st June
12.00 – Mark Pritchard
13.00 – Mount Kimbie
13.25 – Bibio
13.36 – Nightmares on Wax
16.00 – Broadcast
17.00 – kwes.
18.00 – Plaid
19.00 – Aphex Twin
19.30 – Death Grips
20.00 – Oneohtrix Point Never
21.40 – Shayne Oliver / HBA
22.00 – Danny Brown
23.00 – Autechre

Saturday 22nd June
00.00 – John Stanier (Battles)
01.00 – !!!
03.00 – Hassan Rahim
04.00 – Tim Saccenti
06.00 – Ezra Miller
07.00 – Broadcast
08.00 – Clark
09.00 – Paul White
10.00 – Lonelady
12.00 – Kelly Moran
13.00 – Bibio
14.00 – Special Request tribute to LFO
16.20 – Adrian Sherwood
17.00 – Leila
18.00 – Hudson Mohawke
19.00 – Bonehead
19.30 – Evian Christ
21.00 – Squarepusher
22.00 – Flying Lotus
23.00 – Ryuichi Sakamoto

Sunday 23rd June
00.00 – Ryuichi Sakamoto
00.30 – Mira Calix
02.30 – Plaid
03.30 – Rian Treanor
04.30 – DJ Nigga Fox
06.00 – Aphex Twin
08.00 – Kelly Moran
09.00 – Primitive Art
10.00 – Lorenzo Senni
11.35 – Weirdcore
12.35 – Bibio
13.00 – Gonjasufi
14.00 – Winston Hazel (Forgemasters)
15.00 – Gaika
16.00 – Extinction Rebellion x Brian Eno
17.00 – Chris Taylor (Grizzly Bear / CANT)
18.45 – Darkstar
20.00 – Kelela
21.00 – Boards of Canada
23.00 – Autechre

Check it:

www.nts.live/WXAXRXP

The post WARP take over NTS radio with 100 hours of Eno, FlyLo, Autechre… appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Novation’s Bass Station II just got an Aphex Twin mode, crazy features

The Aphex Twin-ification of synths continues – and who’s complaining? Novation’s Bass Station II gets some mind-warping mental sound features, including key-by-key madness from Richard James.

Bass Station II is the powerful analog monosynth from Novation, with sub oscillator, extra acid filter, ring mod, loads of hands-on controls, an arp and keyboard, and all the extras. And like Novation’s full range, it’s also been getting double-stuffed after the fact with extras via firmware updates.

In this case, the headline feature just happens to come from a concept by sonic experimental legend Aphex Twin aka Richard James.

It’s not his first time – as he’s done with some other makers, he encouraged sound design features on the Bass Station II before, in the form of micro-tuning. (Thanks, Richard, for advocating for this feature! Let’s join the revolution.)

So behind unassuming version 4.14, you get an “AFX mode” to get more Aphex Twin-y, and other features:

  • AFX Mode: key-by-key parameters on every note morph your sound (whoa)
  • Fixed duration envelopes (decay slider sets only the duration of the sustain stage instead of when envelopes release)
  • Detunable sub oscillator (so both macro and fine tuning controls can be applied to the sub – that’s the low oscillator beneath)
  • Envelope retrigger count (useful for drum synthesis)
  • Oscillator glide diverge – lets you set the glide time of oscillator 2 relative to oscillator 1 for… uh, diverging glides (think thick, gooey sounds and portamento special effects)

These are actually all potentially useful and deep, but AFX mode is both the most compelling – and the weirdest to explain. Here’s a demo video from Novation’s CALC:

So the basic idea here is, you assign synthesis parameters to each note. It’s a little like having sliced up samples and spread them around the keyboard, only here you’ve done it with different sound parameters. And this goes in different directions – different sounds that you play as an ensemble like a drum kit, what Novation describe as “seed” variations of a single patch, or more nuanced shifts up and down.

Really, it’s an extension of what all keyboard assignments do – only they normally do it only with pitch and crude tracking of pitch to one or two other parameters. Here, you can go further.

Really, it’s a slight misnomer to only make Aphex Twin references here, as you could get quite subtle and practical. But it’s also exciting to imagine going off the deep end with a single, mad preset.

I know people tell me the millennials like video better than reading or something or other like this, so I’ve captured a video of a prominent YouTube influencer trying AFX Mode for the first time and showing his reactions:

And yeah, CALC is … a busy, busy man.

Hella fun to play with. I wonder if something similar might be applied to the Circuit Mono Station. Let’s watch.

https://novationmusic.com/synths/bass-station-ii

The post Novation’s Bass Station II just got an Aphex Twin mode, crazy features appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Experimental Ukrainian music, through a looking glass

April is a generous month for fans of unusual Ukrainian compilations – now having covered new braindance from the country, we’re directed by readers to another set, giving a tour of experimentalism and electronic composition.

Flaming Pines is a wonderful label for experimental music, also setting up its virtual home on Bandcamp, that last best hope for underground digital downloads and physical releases. Check their full catalog for adventurous sounds from 9T Antiope (great stuff) to Kate Carr (seriously, just go give those a listen). The label, a transplant from Sydney to London, has also taken on a number of tours of experimental electronic scenes in far-off locales, including a gorgeous Iranian compilation called Absence, and up-and-coming Vietnamese avant garde in Emergence.

It’s not so much exoticism the label seems to find as threads connecting kindred spirits. And now, having plumbed the depths of mystical sound in Ukrainian duo Gamardah Fungus, the label brings back half of that duo to curate a selection of sounds from that motherland. Igor Yalivec is the guide here, leading us in just twelve tracks to some highlights of established compositional voices and younger contributions alike. Igor you’ll also find showing off modular musicianship as a solo artist in addition to working in the duo:

Guitar and electronics yield magical metallic timbres like a lucid dream, in the work of Gamardah Fungus – some potent brew of remembered folklore and time-warped futurism. It’s Slavic spirit ambient, but always inventive – modal melodies tensely wandering about layers of tape and sound:

So this was a perfect starting point for Kaleiodoscope. That leads to Alla Zahaikevych (aka Zagaykevych) – her work spanning traditional concert music training, historical folk singing technique (with over a decade singing in an ensemble dedicated to the practice), and founding the Electronic Music Studio of Kyiv’s National Music Academy of Ukraine. I can’t think of many composers covering that many directions in a single career worldwide, making her a leader on that stage as well as in Ukraine.

Or there’s Andrey Kiritchenko, obsessively prolific generation X-aged composer who founded the cutting-edge Nexsound label – and has worked with names like Kim Cascone, Francisco López, Andreas Tilliander, Frank Bretschneider, Scanner, Charlemagne Palestine, and many others.

But thinking in generations or separating academy from disreputable underground – it’s fitting that we cross those borders freely now. So it’s an easy step to a younger artist like Motorpig, a visceral, dark project spanning techno, industrial, and experimental veins – and things that are none of those, but rather ambient, undulating merry-go-rounds of texture. (Been a while since there was new Motorpig, so I’m up for any new track):

To come full circle, understanding the reason for this journey out to Ukraine, it’s worth hearing the terrifically nuanced sound world of Flaming Pines’ own Kate Carr. These are ambient soundscapes that breathe and ache, as precarious and fragile as evidently the artist was recording them – “sliding about in freezing mud on steep inclines.” And maybe that’s what this is all about – music that invokes deep spirits and puts itself in positions of extreme difficulty, all to catch fleeting moments of beauty.

So the compilation promises great things – like this utterly chilling vocal composition by Alla Zagaykevych, some evidently convolved, ghostly sound that seems to be about to blow away like frost:

Also in future-vocal territory, Andrey Kiritchenko delivers a chanting vocoder:

The art, at top, also comes from Ukraine – artist Alina Gaeva. I look forward to the compilation coming out on April 22 – but there’s plenty of link holes to drain our PayPal accounts on Bandcamp in the meantime.

https://flamingpines.bandcamp.com/album/kaleidoscope

And all of this makes a nice contrast to that naive nerdy braindance business from a couple of days ago. Previously, on “there’s a lot of really cool music from Ukraine on Bandcamp now and it’s worth dropping doing other things to talk about it”:

From Ukraine, a compilation to resist normality and go braindance

The post Experimental Ukrainian music, through a looking glass appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

SSL SiX is a compact version of that legendary console goodness

Few studio consoles are coveted quite like the Solid State Logic. But SSL have had the clever idea of cutting this down to a compact, still pricey, but luxe desktop mixer. And SiX is a good indication the console is back.

Okay, this isn’t by any means going to be a cheap six-channel mixer. Think £999 +VAT, US$1499, €1199+”tax.” (Oh, yeah. I realize I have no idea what “tax” will mean for UK products in… nine days, possibly. Maybe you’ll just ship SSL some dry goods and penicillin in exchange for their mixer. Ack.)

But, you know, at that price we’re still talking something that’s in reach of a lot of independent producers. And it’s also in line with buying premium plug-ins, especially if you figure in the cost of hardware like UAD or a good audio interface. And instead of a picture on a screen of an SSL console, now you get the actual physical goods on your desk – with the actual circuitry, and no need to watch a DSP or CPU meter.

If you’re not tracking a whole lot of stuff at once, this might be perfect. It certainly makes more sense than renting a studio just to use a couple of channels on their desk.

And you get the full works of SSL stuff:

Two mic pres (SSL’s “SuperAnalogue” brand)
A one-knob version of the SSL channel compressor
Listen Mic compressor on the talkback (often used for creative effect)
Two-band channel EQ

I was skeptical at about the two-band EQ, but then SSL go into more detail – you can switch between shelf and bell curves with different center frequencies for each, so this two-band EQ is actually more versatile than a lot of three-band options. And SSL’s approach is basically, we’ll choose the EQ we think works musically for you, rather than you dialing it in.

There are also routing options borrowed from the larger consoles – two stereo cue buses so you can make independent artist mixes, main and alternate monitor outs (with a source matrix), and mono check, dim, and cut. The fader channels also have real PFL (pre-fade listen), and the Mute button routes to Bus B – which can also be a record send for your DAW, or can get routed into the monitor matrix.

And it’s really those routing options and details of the channels that might actually make this thing worthwhile in a project studio. Do I think some rich producers who have no idea how to mix will buy this thing for the brand alone? Of course!

But fitting intelligent routing options into a compact mixer and including SSL’s signature sounds – these are things I could imagine a mix engineer being happy to invest in.

See also the recent SSL Fusion, which costs about two and a half grand, but gives you SSL’s drive, EQ, compressor, stereo image, and Transformer in a handsome rack.

And there’s a message here: people are keen to buy hardware that lasts in place of software plug-ins.

So while this may not be the most sensible budget buy (uh… in case I need to state the obvious), it absolutely is an appealing design. And it’ll have quite a few people saying “mmmm, maybe I can get by with six channels and twelve-channel summing after all.”

https://solidstatelogic.com/studio/SiX

The post SSL SiX is a compact version of that legendary console goodness appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Watch My Panda Shall Fly play KORG volcas with bits of metal

“Play your KORG volcas with bits of metal instead of your fingers” isn’t one of the Oblique Strategies, but maybe it ought to be.

Sometimes all you need for some musical inspiration is a different approach. So My Panda Shall Fly took a different angle for a session for music video series Homework. Since the volca series use conductive touch for input, a set of metal objects (like coins) will trigger the inputs. Result: some unstable sounds.

I mean, maybe it’s just all part of an influencer campaign for Big Coin, but you never know.

My Panda Shall Fly is a London based producer covering a wide range of bases:

And he’s done some modular loops. We’ve seen him in these here parts before, too:

Artists share Novation Circuit tips, with Shawn Rudiman and My Panda Shall Fly

The post Watch My Panda Shall Fly play KORG volcas with bits of metal appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The Prodigy’s Keith Flint is gone, leaves punk-rock-rave legacy behind

The Prodigy’s lead singer has exploded across social media and music press today, as fans pour their hearts out to an artist who defined a crossover between punk and rave, frontman persona and electronica.

It’s also been revealed by the band that Keith Flint took his own life, adding to the heartbreak many in our electronic music community feel. As one reader told The Guardian today, “people like Keith allowed a lot of people to crucify their own torment and demons.”

Music making is a beautiful and endlessly constructive outlet for so many of us channeling emotions. Yet we have to face a music industry that often does quite the opposite, and a society that amplifies illness rather than provides support and love. This applies to music technology, too, which often lets its own fortunes become intertwined with the entertainment business and all its dangers. I think that has to give us pause, again, for personal reflection about what we can do for ourselves and our friends, and the kind of music world we want to build.

At the same time, to create music and personas that can express feeling and joy – well, that’s something to be thankful for, even when we’re deeply saddened when someone leaves us like this.

Flint’s work for The Prodigy stands alone. But I’d also take issue with MusicRadar’s idea that he was the last frontman. Screw the major labels and the industry. Around the world, punk rock and electronics mix freely, and outlandish men and women find every kind of persona they can imagine as singers and out front of their machines. Certainly for some of them, The Prodigy gave them the feeling of that freedom to be those people, directly or indirectly. And more of these characters will arrive.

All that inspiration remains, and that love for music spreads.

And in a lighter anecdote:

The post The Prodigy’s Keith Flint is gone, leaves punk-rock-rave legacy behind appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Take a 3D trip into experimental turntablism with V-A-C Moscow, Shiva Feshareki

Complex music conjures up radical, fluid architectures, vivid angles – why not experience those spatial and rhythmic structures together? Here’s insight into a music video this week in which experimental turntablism and 3D graphics collide.

And collide is the right word. Sound and image are all hard edges, primitive cuts, stimulating corners.

Shiva Feshareki is a London-born composer and turntablist; she’s also got a radio show on NTS. With a research specialization in Daphne Oram (there’s a whole story there, even), she’s made a name for herself as one of the world’s leading composers working with turntables as medium, playing to the likes of the Royaal Albert Hall with the London Contemporary Orchestra. Her sounds are themselves often spatial and architectural, too – not just taking over art spaces, but working with spatial organization in her compositions.

That makes a perfect fit with the equally frenetic jump cuts and spinning 3D architectures of visualist Daniel James Oliver Haddock. (He’s a man with so many dimensions they named him four times over.)

NEW FORMS, her album on Belfast’s Resist label, explores the fragmented world of “different social forms,” a cut-up analog to today’s sliced-up, broken society. The abstract formal architecture, then, has a mission. As she writes in the liner notes: “if I can demonstrate sonically how one form can be vastly transformed using nothing other than its own material, then I can demonstrate this complexity and vastness of perspective.”

You can watch her playing with turntables and things around and atop turntables on Against the Clock for FACT:

And grab the album from Bandcamp:

Shiva herself works with graphical scores, which are interpreted in the album art by artist Helena Hamilton. Have a gander at that edition:

But since FACT covered the sound side of this, I decided to snag Daniel James Oliver Haddock. Daniel also wins the award this week for “quickest to answer interview questions,” so hey kids, experimental turntablism will give you energy!

Here’s Daniel:

The conception formed out of conversations with Shiva about the nature of her work and the ways in which she approaches sound. She views sound as these unique 3D structures which can change and be manipulated. So I wanted to emulate that in the video. I also was interested in the drawings and diagrams that she makes to plan out different aspects of her performances, mapping out speakers and sound scapes, I thought they were really beautiful in a very clinical way so again I wanted to use them as a staging point for the 3D environments.

I made about 6 environments in cinema 4d which were all inspired by these drawings. Then animated these quite rudimentary irregular polyhedrons in the middle to kind of represent various sounds.

Her work usually has a lot of sound manipulation, so I wanted the shapes to change and have variables. I ended up rendering short scenes in different camera perspectives and movements and also changing the textures from monotone to colour.

After all the Cinema 4d stuff, it was just a case of editing it all together! Which was fairly labour intensive, the track is not only very long but all the sounds have a very unusual tempo to them, some growing over time and then shortening, sounds change and get re-manipulated so that was challenging getting everything cut well. I basically just went through second by second with the waveforms and matched sounds by eye. Once I got the technique down it moved quite quickly. I then got the idea to involve some found footage to kind of break apart the aesthetic a bit.

Of course, there’s a clear link here to Autechre’s Gantz Graf music video, ur-video of all 3D music videos after. But then, there’s something really delightful about seeing those rhythms visualized when they’re produced live on turntables. Just the VJ in me really wants to see the visuals as live performance. (Well, and to me, that’s easier to produce than the Cinema 4D edits!)

But it’s all a real good time with at the audio/visual synesthesia experimental disco.

More:

Watch experimental turntablist Shiva Feshareki’s ‘V-A-C Moscow’ video [FACT]

https://www.shivafeshareki.co.uk/

https://resistbelfast.bandcamp.com/album/new-forms

Resist label

The post Take a 3D trip into experimental turntablism with V-A-C Moscow, Shiva Feshareki appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

The Stylophone goes totally luxe with the GEN R-8

You’ve seen the Stylophone as the mass-produced, toy-like original. And you’ve seen it as a relaunched digital emulation and as an analog instrument. Now get ready for the Stylophone as premium boutique instrument.

The Stylophone began its story back in 1967, and became one of the iconic electronic musical inventions of the 20th century – its appeal being largely to do with its simplicity and directness. The son of the original inventor, Ben Jarvis, went on to revive instrument under the original manufacturer name, Dubreq.

Now, the GEN R-8 is here with some advanced features and flowery description about British circuitry you might expect from the ad copy for a high-end mixing desk. There’s something a bit funny about associating that with the instrument so long known as a (very musical) toy, but – think of the GEN R-8 as a new desktop synth, the full-featured, grown-up monster child of the original.

Oh, and — it sounds like it’s going to be a total bass beast.

So you know in campy horror movies where someone gets hit with a growth ray or radiation or whatever, and turns into a city-smashing giant? Hopefully this is like that, in a good way.

Sound specs:

Dual analog oscillators (VCOs) and full analog signal path.
Divide-down sub-oscillators (one octave lower) and subsub oscillators (two octaves lower) – switch them all on, and you get six oscillators at once.
12 dB state variable filter – low pass, high pass, band pass, wide notch – which they say is their own proprietary design.
ADSR envelope, now with a “punchy” shorter hold stage when you crank attack and decay peaks, they say.

There’s a delay, too – based on the Princeton pt2399 chip, and “grungy” in the creators’ description – which you can modulate via time CV input.

And some classic overdrive, plus an extra booster stage – this part does actually sound a bit like classic British console gear.

And there’s a step sequencer – 8 banks, 16 steps per sequence, both for the internal synth and external gear (CV/gate and MIDI output).

Plus the whole thing is patchable:
There’s an LFO with eight waveforms and dual outputs, which you can patch to all of the CV ins or to other gear.
The patch panel has 19 minijack CV/gate and audio patch points.

The keyboard is now touch-based – so you don’t need a stylus – and has a sort of absurd set of features (MIDI controller output with local on/off, glide and modulation keys, three octaves of keys).

And it’s made of steel.

Price: £299 / $349 / €329
Availability: Late February 2019 [limited edition]

So it’s really Stylophone on steroids – fully patchable, with delay and drive and filter, MIDI and CV, ready to use as a new synth or as a controller tool with other gear (other semi-modulars, Eurorack, MIDI instruments, whatever). It does appear one of the more interesting new instruments of the year – one to watch.

Demo:

https://dubreq.com/genr8/

The post The Stylophone goes totally luxe with the GEN R-8 appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Two acid-y, space-y, terrific live electronic sets for your Friday

A great live set brews up new musical directions before your ears. It’s a burst of creativity and energy that’s distinct from what happens alone in a studio, with layers of process. From Liverpool (Madeline T Hall) and Moscow (Nikita Zabelin x Xandr.vasiliev), here are two fine examples to take you into the weekend.

Acid-tinged synths unfold over this brilliant half hour from M T Hall (pictured, top), at a party hosted earlier this year by HMT Liverpool x Cartier 4 Everyone:

I love that this set feels so organic and colors outside the lines, without ever losing forward drive or focus. It organically morphs from timbre to timbre, genre to genre. So just when it seems like it’s just going to be a straight-ahead acid set (that’s not actually a 303, by the way, it seems), it proceeds to perpetually surprise.

I think people are afraid to create contrast in live sets, but each shift here feels intentioned and confident, and so the result is – you won’t mistake this for someone else’s set.

Check out her artist site; she’s got a wildly diverse set of creative endeavors, including immersive drawing and sound performances, and work as an artist covering sculpture, sound, video and installation. (Madeleine, if you’re reading this, hope we can feature your work in more depth! I just can’t wait to release this particular set first!)

http://the-royal-standard.com/artists/madeline-hall/

And more music:

Darker (well, and redder, thanks to the lighting), but related in its free-flowing machine explorations, we’ve got another set from Moscow from this month:

It’s the project of Nikita Zabelin x Xandr.vasiliev, at Moscow’s Pluton club, a repurposed factory building giving a suitably raw industrial setting.

This is connected for me, though. Dark as it is, the duo isn’t overly serious – weird and whimsical sounds still bubble out of the shadows. And it shows that grooves and free-form sections can intermix successfully. I got to play after this duo in St. Petersburg and you really do get the sense of open improvisation.

Facing off at Moscow’s Pluton.

xandr aka Alexander has a bunch more here:

That inspires me for the coming days. Have a good weekend, everybody.

The post Two acid-y, space-y, terrific live electronic sets for your Friday appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.