Korg Volca Nubass – Röhrensound in der Volca?

Korg Volca NubassKorg Volca Nubass

Korg hat schon sehr lange die Nutube, eine sehr flache Version einer Röhre im Programm. Die wäre eine Grundlage für einen Oszillator, nicht nur als Verzerrer oder Amp. 

Es mal passen lassen mit Röhrensound währe nicht neu. Es gab die Metasonix Wretch Machine, ein kompletter Röhrensynthesizer und es gibt von Erica eine ganze Serie von Röhrenmodule, darunter Filter,VCA und VCO. So lässt sich ein einfacher Bass-Synthesizer mit der Struktur einer TB303 durchaus in das kleine Volca-Gehäuse bauen.

Das Rendering sieht gut aus, dennoch könnte es noch immer ein Fake sein und ist sogar durchaus glaubwürdig, denn technisch wäre es weitgehend machbar. Wie viel Strom die Nutubes ziehen wäre die mögliche Gegenrechnung dazu. Wäre das zu viel, müsste es eine Falschmeldung sein.

Realismus

Die Gehäusemaße und Grundfunktionen wie MIDI, Sequencer und sogar ein kleines Display sind denkbar, dennoch ließe sich das auch ohne Display machen und so ist fast das Display unwahrscheinlicher als die Röhre. Das Display könnte mehr als 16 Steps möglich machen und Parameter-Automationswerte anzeigen.

Wahrheitsabgleich

Die Idee, dass der Nubass einen Suboszillator hat und Saturation passt. Die Auswahl der Schwingungsform Rechteck oder Dreieck ist auch vorgesehen und am Ende gibt es noch Drive und Tone, was eine zweite Röhre machen müsste oder eigene Elektronik wäre. Hier hat man etwas übertrieben und signalisiert – hey, dies könnte Wunschdenken sein. Röhren gab es in den Electribes auch schon, dort waren sie nur als wärmer für den Gesamtsound da und sahen nett aus, notwendig waren sie aber eher nicht.

Weitere Information

Korg hat eine Website, dort findet man das Gerät nicht.

KORG volca fm gets its own custom editor, plug-in

Manage all that FM sound depth of your KORG volca – or dust it off, if you need – with this handy editor for one of the most unique little instruments from the past years.

Momo Müller keeps putting out superb unofficial editors for popular gear – and the latest to get the treatment is KORG’s pint-sized FM synthesizer.

Of all the volcas, the volca fm might be the one that wants this the most – FM synthesis by definition gets some wild results from tiny tweaks. Adding Momo’s plugin lets you integrate your volca with your DAW and get precise control of those settings – plus automate and recall them.

Since you can save presets, this also solves a key issue with the volca fm, which is managing all that variability live and in production.

And yeah, you can give your fingers a rest from those tiny knobs … and have fun playing with the touch strip and sound instead.

U$6.90 / 5,90EUR for Mac (VST, AU, standalone) and Windows (32- and 64-bit VST).

https://korgvolcamidieditor.jimdofree.com

I’m going to put this and the editor for Roland’s D-05 (D-50 boutique reissue) as MVPs here – the D-05 because then you can get away from those well-known presets and take the synthesis engine in other directions.

The post KORG volca fm gets its own custom editor, plug-in appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Oops: April Fools’, at best, gave us stuff we actually want

Well, congratulations – you’ve survived another April Fools’ holiday. At worst, it can be unfunny and confusing. At best, though, it raises a different question – should we actually start dreaming up and making more ridiculous ideas?

Okay, I don’t necessarily want to be the grinch of April Fools’. And maybe now is not the right time to raise this – like, someone might say that it could have something to do with the fact that I attempted a product launch on the holiday, uh, yesterday. (What? That was me? Oh, yeah – it was. MeeBlip geode is not a joke. We are really making it. And um… yeah, that did wind up hitting some confusion, even though there’s nothing particularly April Fools-y about geode.)

While it’s had some glimmers of clever parody, the collision of April Fools’ with an attention-starved Internet has led to a noisy confusion of a bunch of people deciding to write parody press releases and videos, and the ideas can get repetitive. And it can confuse everyone about real news – not just ours. This year, the date came between two of the bigger synth and electronic music events of the year – sandwiched not more than 24 hours apart from Synthplex in the USA and Musikmesse in Frankfurt, Germany. (Yes, Messe is again a thing; even with Superbooth in Berlin stealing away modular makers, there’s a lot of musical instruments business outside modular, a lot of distributors in Germany, an entire industry around lighting tech, the music education business in Germany, and a competitive Messe organization slashing rates on booths, so expect it to stick around.)

But about the fake products we wish were real products … sigh, again.

Biggest culprit: KORG.

Yeah, okay, it’s probably not terribly practical for KORG to make a cassette volca. On the other hand, it’s not just the Rickroll video that’s tonedeaf to 2019 – lots of us have repurposed our cassette decks. I have a Yamaha multitrack sitting next to me in the studio wired up. People are making tape loops with Walkmans. There are tape labels. Bastl Instruments and Teenage Engineering, among others, have made digital decks that reimagine tape loops and tape playback. And having seen weird tape players show up on Amazon, I expect it’s not impossible to make new hardware that includes mechanical tape playback in it.

So the joke’s really on KORG here. Instead of getting pranked or sharing this because it was funny, literally thousands of people jumped on the idea of a KORG volcasette. (Obviously the biggest clue in – using KORG’s volca series nomenclature, it should have been KORG cassette or KORG tape. Just sayin’.)

The proposed features of this thing already exist on multitrack tape recorders, but the mind reels with other possibilities – looping, sampling, strange custom tape echoes…

And yes, of course there was the Ableton’s ReChorder – maybe the one amusing part of the parody there was, the awful music at the end does kind of remind me of some terrible demos of unusual instruments over the years. This one we can at least leave out of the instances of products people would want.

But even silly April Fools’ products can go viral – perhaps because we live in a world where brands are doing such strange things already, it’s not clear how you could make a joke that was any more absurd.

So, a HYPERX CUP MIX-IN pair of headphones shaped like two Cup Noodles containers and a fork had some of us … wanting instant ramen … and others actually wanting to try to buy the product. (Various blogs even picked this up assuming it was real.) I have a pair of Beats by Dre headphones in white that I suddenly want to mod to actually do this.

Useful? No. Possible to DIY? Yes. Tempting? Oh, indeed. (I’m sure some sort of ramen container housing could work.)

CUP NOODLES®
HYPERX CUP MIX-IN

Then there was this USB-C hub covered in legacy ports. Except… yeah, I definitely would buy something like that. (SCSI for old drives? Actual analog video? Tons of extra ports, or card readers?)

Sure, this is … not totally possible. But parts of it are and … you know you want it. Their ridiculous specs, though take any subset of these and you might be happy.

Thick, heavy, substantial styling.
Built-in 100Wh / 27000mAh airline-safe battery pack
2-in-1 speaker and space heater using the same front air vent holes (temperature depending on the number of active connections)
USB-C hub with a total of 40 ports
9 x USB-C
9 x USB-A
2 x microSD
2 x SD
1 x 3.5mm Audio Jack
1 x HDMI
2 x DisplayPort
1 x Mini DVI
1 x VGA
1 x Ethernet
1 x Modem RJ-11
1 x Optical Audio “Toslink”
1 x Firewire 400
1 x Firewire 800
2 x RCA
1 x Parallel Port
1 x Serial Port
1 x PS/2
1 x AT Port
1 x 3.5” Floppy Disk Drive

Hyper Releases The Mother Of All USB-C Hubs

Hey, there is a lot of bandwidth on Thunderbolt 3. I think this particular device might catch fire. But it is possible to have more ports.

Part of the reason this isn’t a joke: a friend urgently needed to pull files off a SCSI drive. I wound up looking back at Apple machines from just around the turn of the century, which in fact had every port you could imagine. The bronze keyboard PowerBook G3 Series, for instance, includes both USB and SCSI – and since it runs used for $200, you can actually buy that entire laptop to transfer data from legacy drives more easily than you can buy a modern SCSI adapter. (The adapters appear to be both more expensive and more scarce than the entire computers.)

Or for a more extreme example, consider the PowerMac G3 Series. This machine was everything Steve Jobs stamped out at Apple – boxy, with a beige slightly curved-out ID design language that mostly evolved under CEO John Sculley. But it sure had ports. Photo (CC-BY-SA) Miguel Durán.

Maybe you’ll rescue the legacy devices, but I do miss analog video – badly. And the notion of professional machines where you might actually connect various hardware, that bit still seems relevant. I love compact and friendly devices, but I also love choice.

And of course the only real joke is trying to figure out how to buy a USB-C device or cable … ahem … (to say nothing of those Apple cable prices).

Maybe the bottom line here, though, is that one person’s joke is another person’s dream. Some of the best, most creative ideas start as jokes. April Fools’ as far as I’m concerned in tech just needs to go away – it’s a day that adds noise and confusion to media that don’t need more of that, ever. But here’s another approach: maybe we should be willing to dream up absurd ideas the other 364 days of the year.

You know.

See any April Fools’ jokes you wish were real – and anybody up for actually making it happen?

Time to pick up a Walkman at the next flea market and start hacking; that’s for sure.

[Side note – unless you think I’m alone in this, The Verge has been pointing out April Fools’ as the (literally) Medieval time waster that needs to die. And Microsoft also banned April Fools’, which might itself seem like a punchline, except that … no, we really want you to be focused on your damned software, actually, so agreed.]

The post Oops: April Fools’, at best, gave us stuff we actually want appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Watch My Panda Shall Fly play KORG volcas with bits of metal

“Play your KORG volcas with bits of metal instead of your fingers” isn’t one of the Oblique Strategies, but maybe it ought to be.

Sometimes all you need for some musical inspiration is a different approach. So My Panda Shall Fly took a different angle for a session for music video series Homework. Since the volca series use conductive touch for input, a set of metal objects (like coins) will trigger the inputs. Result: some unstable sounds.

I mean, maybe it’s just all part of an influencer campaign for Big Coin, but you never know.

My Panda Shall Fly is a London based producer covering a wide range of bases:

And he’s done some modular loops. We’ve seen him in these here parts before, too:

Artists share Novation Circuit tips, with Shawn Rudiman and My Panda Shall Fly

The post Watch My Panda Shall Fly play KORG volcas with bits of metal appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

NAMM 2019: Korg Volca Drum – Machinedrum ähnliche digitale Percussion im Kleinformat

Korg Volca Drum Digital Percussion Synthesizer Close UpKorg Volca Drum Digital Percussion Synthesizer Close Up

Korg hat nicht nur den (bereits geleakte) neuen Volca Modular pünktlich vor der NAMM 2019 fertiggestellt, sondern auch noch das Volca Drum. Es spezialisiert sich auf die typisch „synthetischen“ Klänge von digitalen Drummachines, kann aber ein wenig mehr. Es erzeugt Sounds nicht analog oder via PCM-Samples, sondern berechnet via DSP – das gibt eine Latte an Möglichkeiten.

Eigentlich ist die Idee auch für Korg nicht neu, denn die Electribe R war genau das, eine digitale Drummachine, die aber die klassischen Drum-Modelle an Bord hat. Es gibt 6 Drumsounds, die allesamt synthetisch sind. Es erinnert an Elektrons Machinedrum, auch weil es sogar ein richtiges Display gibt, welches Wellenformen und mehr darstellt. Ein Drumsound besteht generell aus einem Rauschanteil und einem tonalen Part und die kann man hier entsprechend einstellen. Dafür gibt es drei Potis für den Klang selbst und weitere für Hüllkurven der jeweiligen Anteile der Sounds wie etwa der Snare.

Der 16-Step-Sequencer animiert die sechs Sounds und damit ist der Drum das Gegenstück zur Sample-Volca oder der Microtonic unter den Volcas. Auch vorher gab es ja eine analoge Drummachine bei den Volcas, den „Beats“, aber der ist eher wie ein klassischer Drumcomputer aufgebaut mit wenigen Einstellmöglichkeiten und erinnert eher an die MFB Drummachines, als diese noch sehr klein und blau waren. Die Erzeugung ist aber nicht nur mit Filter oder Oszillator in der einfachen Form vorhanden, es gibt durchaus auch noch Wavefolding für mehr Obertöne. Es sind schon ganze Drum-Modelle, so ähnlich wie Elektrons „Machines“. Wie auch immer man sie nennt, sie sind alle nicht neu, nur sind sie in einer Volca neu. Die Preise stehen nicht endgültig fest, man kann aber mit unter 199 Euro rechnen.

Korg Volca Drum

Korg Volca Drum Digital Percussion Synthesizer

Mehr Infos

Videos

NAMM 2019: Korg Volca Drum – Machinedrum ähnliche digitale Percussion im Kleinformat

Korg Volca Drum Digital Percussion Synthesizer Close UpKorg Volca Drum Digital Percussion Synthesizer Close Up

Korg hat nicht nur den (bereits geleakte) neuen Volca Modular pünktlich vor der NAMM 2019 fertiggestellt, sondern auch noch das Volca Drum. Es spezialisiert sich auf die typisch „synthetischen“ Klänge von digitalen Drummachines, kann aber ein wenig mehr. Es erzeugt Sounds nicht analog oder via PCM-Samples, sondern berechnet via DSP – das gibt eine Latte an Möglichkeiten.

Eigentlich ist die Idee auch für Korg nicht neu, denn die Electribe R war genau das, eine digitale Drummachine, die aber die klassischen Drum-Modelle an Bord hat. Es gibt 6 Drumsounds, die allesamt synthetisch sind. Es erinnert an Elektrons Machinedrum, auch weil es sogar ein richtiges Display gibt, welches Wellenformen und mehr darstellt. Ein Drumsound besteht generell aus einem Rauschanteil und einem tonalen Part und die kann man hier entsprechend einstellen. Dafür gibt es drei Potis für den Klang selbst und weitere für Hüllkurven der jeweiligen Anteile der Sounds wie etwa der Snare.

Der 16-Step-Sequencer animiert die sechs Sounds und damit ist der Drum das Gegenstück zur Sample-Volca oder der Microtonic unter den Volcas. Auch vorher gab es ja eine analoge Drummachine bei den Volcas, den „Beats“, aber der ist eher wie ein klassischer Drumcomputer aufgebaut mit wenigen Einstellmöglichkeiten und erinnert eher an die MFB Drummachines, als diese noch sehr klein und blau waren. Die Erzeugung ist aber nicht nur mit Filter oder Oszillator in der einfachen Form vorhanden, es gibt durchaus auch noch Wavefolding für mehr Obertöne. Es sind schon ganze Drum-Modelle, so ähnlich wie Elektrons „Machines“. Wie auch immer man sie nennt, sie sind alle nicht neu, nur sind sie in einer Volca neu. Die Preise stehen nicht endgültig fest, man kann aber mit unter 199 Euro rechnen.

Korg Volca Drum

Korg Volca Drum Digital Percussion Synthesizer

Mehr Infos

Videos

NAMM 2019: Korg Volca Modular – semimodulare Wunderkiste?

Korg Volca Modular West Coast SynthesizerKorg Volca Modular West Coast Synthesizer

Wir wussten zwar schon durch den Leak vom Volca Modular, aber nun haben wir die Gewissheit: Er kommt zur NAMM 2019. Der Name ist allerdings etwas überschwänglich gewählt, denn er ist eigentlich nur semimodular. Wie es klingt, erfahrt ihr hier.

Korg Volca Modular

Eigentlich passiert beim Modular, was alle wünschen, alle lieben, aber niemand gewagt hat, dass Korg das ausgerechnet in das Volca-Format stecken würde. Sie haben es aber getan. Wir berichteten dazu auch bereits. Was für Make Noise 0-coast und für Buchla und Co. üblich, landet in minimaler Form auch im Volca und lässt sich mit kleinen Käbelchen patchen. Das Prinzip wurde klar vom Anyware Tinysizer übernommen, er war deutlich der, der dieses Prinzip erstmals verwendet hat. Er enthält sogar eine Art Woggle-Bug, einer erweiterten Mehrfach-Sample & Hold Einheit, die von Grant Richter (Wiard) in die Welt gebracht wurde.  Es gibt zwei Lowpass-Gates und somit haben wir es mit Westküsten-Denkweise zu tun. Der Oszillator ist mit Wavefolding/Waveshaping ausgestattet, um obertonreiche Klänge zu generieren, auch Grant Richter hat damals das Borg-Filter, eine Kombination aus Buchla und Korg gemacht, was hier wohl auch hier teilweise mit drin steckt, allerdings gibt es keine Resonanz, so wie das bei LPGs üblich ist. Mehr Verarbeitung bekommt man über die logischen Verknüpfungen hin, die für Audio und Modulation tauglich sind.

Die Bedeutung dieser Volca ist wohl doch als hoch einzustufen und der Preis soll dennoch unter 199 Euro liegen. Die Beliebtheit des 0-Coast ist nach-wie-vor hoch und nun kann „jeder“ in diese Welt einsteigen, die bei Make Noise immerhin noch 529 Euro kostet. Korg hat inzwischen alles nachgeliefert, was man liefern kann – wie macht man die berühmten Buchla Bongos? Wie geht man damit um? Und was macht er wirklich genau? Richtig gut ist auch der Hall, denn zu Geräten dieser Bauart passt immer etwas Hall. Die Hüllkurve ist natürlich vom Typ AR. Das reicht aber auch und ist für diese Form auch genug. Der Sequencer hat 16 Steps und kann auch zufällig abspielen, was durchaus wichtig ist für Synthesizer dieser Art.

Mehr Infos

Video

KORG volca modular and volca drum are real – and now we’ve got details

Some things are too good, or too improbable, to be true. Apparently that doesn’t apply to KORG’s volca series. Because if the ultra-compact, affordable modular and drum were exactly what you wished for, well – they’re here.

These will look familiar, because images of the top panels of these two pieces of kit hit the Internet in December. The funny thing was, a lot of people responded with “oh there’s no way that modular could be real.” Guess again.

The newest volcas are a modeled drum/percussion unit and a compact modular with tiny header pins for patching.

volca drum

This isn’t the volca series’ first take on percussion. It’s had a full drum machine with analog circuitry (volca beats), a bass drum synth piece built around the classic MS-20 filter (volca kick), and a digital sampling machine (volca sample).

But volca drum could turn out to be the most interesting yet, if they’ve nailed its sound source. volca drum is a percussion synth, with diffeent DSP-based models for sounds.

The WAVE GUIDE controls in the middle are the most interesting. And of course, having KORG’s sequencer with motion controls attached to a parameterized percussion synth seems really tasty – as with the volca kick, this could be interesting for all kinds of different parts, not just the obvious ones. But we’ll have to wait to hear more about it.

KORG for their part promise “standard percussive sounds” and “eccentric drum styles.”

Price: US$169.99

Availability: early 2019

volca modular

The volca drum has been so far overshadowed, though, by the curiosity of the volca modular.

There are eight independent functional modules in this unit. They’re pre-wired for patchless operation, but you can also reconfigure them with a whopping 50 patch points. Tiny jumper wires are included for connecting to the onboard pins. The volca modular is like a tiny toybox of sound design – a Buchla Easel for cash strapped millennials. (Okay, all of us older folks, too.)

Okay, but then – is it a modular? Well, even KORG cautiously dub it “semi-modular,” but while there’s no clear line, I’d say even modular is a reasonable term. While modular is now taken by some to mean something with interchangeable modules, especially in this age of Eurorack, I’d say anything with discrete functional modules that be interconnected in different ways ought to qualify.

And yeah, while this will work without patching, so too did the ARP 2500, and no one called that semi-modular.

Enough of semantics, though: it’s cool, as you’ll see in today’s hands-on review from Francis Preve.

The price is a little higher for a volca, but … no matter. This is a spectacular amount of modular patching in a single unit, and I think it’ll be really popular.

Price: US$199.99

Availability: early 2019

Side note: KORG are hardly the first to suggest this kind of modular patching. Phillip Stearns and Peter Edwards envisioned a modular system you’d build entirely on a breadboard – hyper-modular, if you will:

Edwards went to work for Bastl Instruments, who not coincidentally employed these jumper wires on their own instruments (like Kastle).

And if you feel volca modular isn’t quite what you’d want in a volca modular – like you’d rather have interchangeable, separate modules – that’s been done, too, in the form of the AE Modular Synth:

But the volca modular is unique in focusing on West Coast style synths – an oscillator source you make more complex with modulation and wavefolding, and which even gets fed into Buchla-style modules like the LPG (low pass gate).

And let’s be clear: it’s also unique and cool. Hope I get to play with one, too, soon.

The post KORG volca modular and volca drum are real – and now we’ve got details appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Images of KORG volca modular, volca drum appear online

Unconfirmed and unofficial images identified as KORG volca modular and volca drum are circulating across social media channels today, after first appearing on Reddit.

Normally, this site refrains from posting leaks and rumors, but in this case, the images have quickly become ubiquitous – perhaps speaking to the unique appeal of the volca line. (Literally, my inbox and feeds now are clogged with people posting them.)

The images appear to show a drum synth and patchable mini-modular, in the existing volca form factor. We can’t comment on their authenticity.

They’re even becoming the buzz of YouTube:

What do you think? Let us know in comments.

The post Images of KORG volca modular, volca drum appear online appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

2 Korg Volcas – Modular mit Buchla-Elementen und aufwendigerer Drum-„Synthese“

Korg Volca ModularKorg Volca Modular

Noch ist nicht NAMM, aber gleich zwei sehr spannende Volcas sind aufgetaucht. Davon einer sogar modular.

Wenn einer noch einmal was toppen kann, dann wohl Korg.
Synthjam postet auf Instagram jeweils eine Cola mit recht großem Display und Grafiken von Wellenformen für den Drum, er scheint eine art virtuelle oder auch analoge Drumsynthese zu verwenden, einige Parameter dazu sind klassische Dinge wie Hüllkurven und ein tonaler Anteil. So etwas ist vermutlich ein kompletter Drumsynth für einen Sound, könnte aber auch für mehrere stehen, da es offenbar 2 Layer gibt sind es vielleicht auch 2 Sounds gleichzeitig.

Beim Modular Gibt es einen Oszillator mit „Folder“ (Waveshaping/Folding), alle klassischen Wellenformen und zwei Filter wie in einem MS20 und etwas, was wie logische Verknüpfungen aussieht. Mit so etwas kann man auch etwas wie Ringmodulation herstellen oder andere Dinge, was aber nicht eindeutig zu erkennen ist. Es gibt aber keine Resonanz, denn die beiden Filter sind LPGs, also im Buchla-Stil Filter und VCAs zugleich. Außerdem findet man einen Woggle-Modus. Das bedeutet wohl Woggle-Bug, eine Kombination aus LFOs und Sample & Hold Gliedern. Das alles ist für Korg sehr neu und eher am 0-Coast und dem Buchla Music Easel und ähnlichen Geräten orientiert. Das wird sehr interessant werden und die Preise sind sicherlich unter 199€ zu vermuten. Zur NAMM wird man wohl mehr wissen.