Notch visual tool now does streaming, keying, and more interactive control

Notch is a wonder – another example of how real-time visuals continue to advance to the point of being as expressive as instruments. And the latest update makes it more capable, from input to keying to streaming.

The post Notch visual tool now does streaming, keying, and more interactive control appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Where to start in Eurorack? This video makes you a Buchla Music Easel-style rig, but in modules

Eurorack may be known for its addictiveness, but some synth lovers suffer just as much for tyranny of choice. This tutorial cures both that and Buchla Music Easel envy.

The Music Easel, if you don’t know it, is a beautiful instrument – a lunchbox full of seemingly limitless possibilities. And you can even get a brand-spanking new rendition of the 1973 original, with the Buchla name badge (or their current incarnation).

But even though that instrument is known for its all-in-one design, there’s reason to think Eurorack as an option – greater flexibility, lower cost, each by a significant margin.

Or to put it another way, it’s a great way to understand different module choices without getting overwhelmed. And that’s where this video from Mylar Melodies comes in:

It’s a pretty good rundown of the Music Easel itself (meaning a useful explainer there), as it starts with the real thing. Then, mindful of limitations, it walks through a suggested system with related features, plus how to make sounds and sequence your ideas, too.

Also, there’s a big supporting star in the form of Arturia’s low-cost MicroFreak, so this gives you a taste for what that instrument is capable of – and how you might connect it, analog style.

(I’m also tempted to try some of this stuff in VCV Rack and other computer software – and the MicroFreak still holds potential.)

Amplitude modulation, frequency modulation, sequencing, and a techno jam – all bases covered!

Mylar Melodies promises more in this series.

It’s the first in a new “suggested systems” concept series I’ve been brewing for some months – using a small 62HP Intellijel Palette eurorack case to make examples of focused, purpose-driven modular rigs and then demo and explain them on camera. Eg. “Generative melody system”, “subtractive semi-modular synth expander”, “self playing drone machine”, and first and foremost “Buchla Music Easel-inspired synth”. 

It’s based on the infinite number of “where do I start” posts where people are getting lost in this format as they’re paralysed by choice – so it’ll give some much needed tangible serving suggestions (far smaller than off the shelf systems, except the Erica Synths Pico), and it’s also a way to discuss basic modular concepts in a form that’s actually clear and digestible – which I just don’t think you can do when you have a massive modular on camera. And mores the point, I don’t want to glorify having a massive rig, full stop – I think it’s far better overall to glorify having a tiny one. So that’s what this aims to do. 

Look forward to more in this series – it’s a great idea!

PS, you can check out the Intellijel cases and power and accessories used in this series:

Now let’s see if Eurobuchla becomes a thing. West Coast – as in the west coast of Portugal?

The post Where to start in Eurorack? This video makes you a Buchla Music Easel-style rig, but in modules appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Live coders from all over the world are playing music and visuals live online, right now

It’s just business as usual for the live coding scene and algorave movement. From every corner of the globe, freely-coded performance is happening for four days straight – now.

They come from Brasilia. They come from Detroit. They come from Indonesia and Antwerp, Ukraine and Mumbai, Rome and Miami and Japan. They’re running free software and browsers and DIY electronic and visuals. You can dance to what they’re doing. You can’t dance to what they’re doing. This is an experiment.

They’ve all come to Algorave.

youtube.com/eulerroom
twitch.tv/eulerroom
facebook.com/eulerroom

Something rather nice is on as I type this.

Check the full schedule:

http://equinox.eulerroom.com/schedule.html

This is not a new idea, either – TOPLAP live coding community is using this event to celebrate their sixteenth anniversary. So while everyone else is suddenly discovering the fragile nature of our world and the distances between us, these are tools with a significant head start. And the tools are not a gimmick, either – because they’re free and open source and run on low-end hardware, they’re uniquely global and agile.

They’re part of the fabric that makes electronic music now dynamic – and durable.

So algorave on! And hi to some friends playing, see you online soon!

Happy March equinox everyone – spring to the northern hemisphere, fall to the southern. Sonic festivities on the Eulerroom Equinox stretch through 1:30 Greenwich Mean Time 23 March.

(Wait, make that Stardate 97813.31 – 97824.25.)

Want some tools to try live coding now? Many are approachable even if you’re a non-coder – don’t be afraid to try stuff out and break things! Check out:

Gibber – great place to start in-browser

TidalCycles for music

Hydra for visuals in the browser (see our interview with Olivia, the creator)

Side note: I know a lot of these artists and developers will need support soon, in this health and economic crisis. I know a lot of them needed it long before things have gotten tougher. Let’s keep that conversation going here on CDM, too, and find out what solutions we can create together. Don’t hesitate to be in touch and let me or other members of this community know how you’re doing and what you need.

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Here’s ten hours of infinite fractals and falling Shepard’s Tones

Yesterday was one of the stranger 24 hours in the 15+ year history of producing this site, as you may have heard. So here is a palette cleanser, then, in case you have a … wine hangover.

Please be careful if you’re prone to epilepsy.

Oh, and welcome, new CDM readers! If you’re confused and wonder if it’s always like this here, I am confused, too, and … yes. It pretty much is. There’s a mailing list, if you want this to continue.

If ten hours isn’t enough of this sound for some reason, there’s also an online generator with binaural output so you can really trip out (wear headphones).

There are some terrific background notes already on the video, which can lead you into a nice research audiovisual linkhole to match your synesthesia trip:

Video: Used with permission from the animated fractal’s creator, Vladimir Bulatov. Check out his YouTube page here: http://bit.ly/13jdZ7e , and his DeviantArt page here: http://bit.ly/Yx2S78 .

The video is a fractal version of M.C. Escher’s “Circle Limit III” (http://bit.ly/bbJ9P) created by Bulatov.

Audio: Shepard’s Tone (Shepard’s Scale) consisting of rising tones set octaves apart, similar to how to barber’s pole always seems to be rising: http://bit.ly/tlSj Interestingly, the Batman’s BatPod in “The Dark Knight” uses a Shepard Tone effect to make the motorcycle to seem to have an infinitely rising tone: http://bit.ly/Wfa8WS In classical music, the Shepard’s Scale is used in pieces like Bach’s “Canon Per Tonos” (endlessly rising canon), to have the piece seem to end an octave higher than it began while ending on the same note: http://bit.ly/YTWtzC Many have said that they experience a falling sensation or a feeling of imbalance when they watch this combination for a long time. It was reported by Reddit user “Berkel” that by playing The Shepard tone near a sleeping friend, the friend had a visceral falling dream and woke up very scared. http://bit.ly/XVwfi8 .

We would not recommend trying this! We take no responsibility for visceral dreams, dizziness, fatigue, sweaty palms, seizures, lack of friends, or any other side effects from watching this video.

And yeah, that’s a Shepard Tone, not to be confused with a Shepherd’s Tone, which is presumably what happens when you attempt to tend to your sheep while also catching up on your anthology of French experimental electronic music.

Here’s some more reading on that:

If you want to really be a snob CDM style, despite what you may have heard from our ‘haters’, clearly you need to nitpick the difference between a Shepard Tone and a Shepard-Risset glissando. (Hey, where’d everyone go?! Fine. More wine for me.)

But these kinds of risers and sounds are actually easy to produce – even for free – and can be used in a wide variety of contexts to produce extra suspense and a feeling of constant falling or rising.

Here you go!

It works really well in the free software SuperCollider, which you can run on almost any computer and any OS – no massive CEO-style budget required:

And there are lots of other ways to go about this, too – including some tutorials new to me (and you can even sample sound sources):

And yeah, it’s in sound design, too:

Risset rhythms are even crazier. I’m still waiting for someone to invent a new music genre based on this. (Chicago, I’d ask you, though by now you really have given us enough.)

If you do create a new Risset rhythm-based musical style, let us know about it. My shoes are laced up and ready to dance to it.

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Gaze into the geometric sound and visual world of Alva Noto, with UNIEQAV

German music and media master Alva Noto, aka Carsten Nicolai, has released his full UNIEQAV audiovisual show online. In other words – get your sine wave on, ears and eyeballs, from the comfort of your own home.

As you’d expect from the Noton founder, the world of UNIEQAV is digital in its purest sense – mathematics and code on full display, raw single-cycle wavetables, minimal graphics celebrating color and line.

The full playlist is on YouTube. Some of these clips are not advisable if you have epilepsy. (Oddly, the things that trigger epilepsy victims make me really calm, which I presume says something about the brain, and makes me wish I better-understood neurology and perception.)

Some pleasing moments:

All sound and conception/design is Carsten Nicolai/Alva Noto, with visuals programmed by NIBO FX of Mohali, India. (Also on YouTube.)

The 2018 album is available direct (including lossless, physical) on the Noton site:

https://noton.greedbag.com/buy/unieqav/

For higher quality movies, check Apple Music. (Hey, “would you like to watch some Alva Noto on my giant flat panel in high res” would probably get me to come home with you, so I guess I’m a digital media nerd.)

https://music.apple.com/us/artist/alva-noto/27060192#see-all/recent-videos

Carsten once told us in a talk I moderated at SONAR, alongside Raster founder and friend/collaborator Olaf Bender, that these abstractions were a way of resisting audiovisual propaganda. It’s programming, then, not to serve a pre-defined narrative, but for programming’s sake – mathematical philosophy and objectivism.

I suspect it’s also possible Carsten really, really likes Japan. This piece references Tokyo’s UNIT nightclub, third in a series there. I suppose one personal attraction for me to both Germany and Japan is that they both contemplate tools as art – whether it’s Berlin and software code, or traditional Japan and the careful study and trade of even utensils of tea preparation. I don’t even mean that by analogy – I think many of us who care about sound and visuals also consider time spent contemplating their tools to be part of the process. I can easily imagine that also is part of the connection for Alva Noto artworks.

At least in modern Japan, strict rules governing dancing may also have produced a particular environment for audiovisual work. A 67-year dancing ban has meant that a nightclub is not synonymous with a dancefloor. Even with those laws loosened, it’s not uncommon today to see people stand in contemplation of a show, presumably as a remnant of this history. But for the club-artwork mix of classic Alva Noto, it fits.

I haven’t gotten to speak with Carsten about this and whether it’s connected, but Japanese aesthetics and a history playing there have been part of the whole (former) Raster-Noton crew. Oh, plus Noton will sell you a very attractive Japanese calendar. I also like their logo. Can’t put my finger on why, exactly.

If you’re in Berlin rather than Japan, you can catch Carsten and his brother go up against Robert Lippok and his brother in a back to back to back to back DJ pairing at Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin and Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. (Seriously, that is the full name of the museum. When German can’t make really long single words, it can still compensate by making really long names for things with multiple words!)

It’s a DJ battle for the ages, and true to form for Carsten’s art world savvy, it also makes the museum the showcase for music. I cannot report for certain whether this “battle” is also a contest for the honor of the two labels Noton and Raster, but it at least makes a fine show of fraternity and love of music. Enjoy that tomorrow night; I’m in Montreal.

Here is that talk, maybe one of the last to put Olaf and Carsten together onstage as Raster-Noton, though – it’s all still in the family, even as each label and platform now focuses elegantly on their own direction.

Image at top: SONAR Istanbul 2018 performance of this show, photo Feli Gutiérres.

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Now that MOTU’s DP does clips, here’s a video explaining how to use them

If you normally leave a DAW like DP in order to do non-linear clip triggering with other software or hardware, MOTU have something they’d like to show you.

There’s no mistaking what this looks like – this really is the Session View from Ableton Live. Then again, we’ve had some glimpse of that for nearly 20 years, so it’s surprising – given the usual leapfrog and borrowing DAWs do in music production – that no traditional DAW has really pulled off the same thing. (Cakewalk’s SONAR tried, as did Cakewalk’s little-known tool called Project5, but their implementation didn’t really catch on, making that more historical footnote than anything.)

Deja vu?

And we’re not only talking about Live – this same sort of non-linear clip triggering is also something familiar in samplers and other tools.

So it is a big deal that MOTU has added clips, with some twists of their own – a couple I wouldn’t mind Ableton picking up on. And I think it’s telling that you aren’t hearing a lot of complaints that this rips off Live, which says to the Live user base and the DP user base are likely fairly independent – or that these tools solve different problems. (Feel free to give more feedback on this, though.)

https://motu.com/products/software/dp/

The post Now that MOTU’s DP does clips, here’s a video explaining how to use them appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

A documentary on Dresden’s techno scene, now free to watch

Berlin, Frankfurt, Cologne … try Dresden. Rauschen im Tal, a documentary of the emergence of Dresden electronic music, struck a nerve and sold out theaters. And now it’s free to watch (in German, with English subtitles).

Here’s the original trailer for the film, though you get mainly disembodied male voices there:

From the producers’ description:

The noise of a city opens up only to those who are completely immersed. In the early 90s, a new sound appeared. It was an uncompromising electrical noise. Someone said, “This is techno!” At that time, a multitude of people – around this new sound – discovered a new cosmos. The city’s eclectic party life made Dresden a Techno stronghold in the East. Since then, an active music scene developed, an almost 30-year-old culture of electronic music in Saxony’s capital with more than 20 record labels and about two dozen dance clubs.

A new cosmos, indeed.

Also nice – the music takes long breaks to just play tracks, with track IDs – plus some nice interpretive dancing. It’s ideal chill-out watching, a documentary on music that has actual music in it. (The lineup is pretty boy heavy; I’m curious to get feedback from my German neighbors on that and other elements. But it’s still a great introduction.)

This quote: “The best parties I ever played, as far as Europe is concerned, is in Dresden – because I never had to … conform myself to a certain style.” -Melvin Oliphant III. Cough, Berlin, cough. Something to consider.

The full documentary makes a nice watch for exploring the darker corners of Germany’s electronic underground. And of course, as usual, the answer to where “techno” as we now know it came from – Germany or Detroit (or Latin America, or wherever you like) is – yes. All of that. Pairing that often wild and disconnected German identity with the far-off pioneers of America’s scene (and progenitors of ‘techno’ as genre) makes that experience richer. Now as many of those Detroit legends haunt the streets of Berlin, perhaps it’s the perfect time to understand the world of Germany’s own fringe culture, and the unprecedented big bang as a nation was put back together from two pieces, against the collapse of an entire political-economic regime and the global ripples it caused. It says something about Americans that the people pushed out of our own culture were able to find new opportunities and kindred spirits on the other side of the world.

And, actually, maybe the best way to escape techno as history museum is to actually learn the history.

The film, from creators Roman Schlaack, Denis Wrobel, and Thamash Kestawitz, runs just over an hour and a half.

Enjoy!

DE:

Das Rauschen einer Stadt erschließt sich nur demjenigen der ganz eintaucht. Anfang der 90er Jahre tauchte ein neues Geräusch auf. Es war ein kompromissloses elektrisches Geräusch. Irgendjemand sagte: „Das ist Techno!“ Damals eröffnete sich für eine Vielzahl von Menschen – um diesen neuen Klang herum – ein eigener Kosmos. Der vielseitige Partyalltag ließ Dresden zu einer Techno-Hochburg im Osten avancieren. Seitdem entwickelte sich eine aktive Musikszene, eine fast 30 Jahre existierende Kultur der elektronischen Musik in der Sächsischen Hauptstadt mit über 20 Plattenlabels und gut zwei dutzend Tanzklubs.

The post A documentary on Dresden’s techno scene, now free to watch appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

A documentary on Dresden’s techno scene, now free to watch

Berlin, Frankfurt, Cologne … try Dresden. Rauschen im Tal, a documentary of the emergence of Dresden electronic music, struck a nerve and sold out theaters. And now it’s free to watch (in German, with English subtitles).

Here’s the original trailer for the film, though you get mainly disembodied male voices there:

From the producers’ description:

The noise of a city opens up only to those who are completely immersed. In the early 90s, a new sound appeared. It was an uncompromising electrical noise. Someone said, “This is techno!” At that time, a multitude of people – around this new sound – discovered a new cosmos. The city’s eclectic party life made Dresden a Techno stronghold in the East. Since then, an active music scene developed, an almost 30-year-old culture of electronic music in Saxony’s capital with more than 20 record labels and about two dozen dance clubs.

A new cosmos, indeed.

Also nice – the music takes long breaks to just play tracks, with track IDs – plus some nice interpretive dancing. It’s ideal chill-out watching, a documentary on music that has actual music in it. (The lineup is pretty boy heavy; I’m curious to get feedback from my German neighbors on that and other elements. But it’s still a great introduction.)

This quote: “The best parties I ever played, as far as Europe is concerned, is in Dresden – because I never had to … conform myself to a certain style.” -Melvin Oliphant III. Cough, Berlin, cough. Something to consider.

The full documentary makes a nice watch for exploring the darker corners of Germany’s electronic underground. And of course, as usual, the answer to where “techno” as we now know it came from – Germany or Detroit (or Latin America, or wherever you like) is – yes. All of that. Pairing that often wild and disconnected German identity with the far-off pioneers of America’s scene (and progenitors of ‘techno’ as genre) makes that experience richer. Now as many of those Detroit legends haunt the streets of Berlin, perhaps it’s the perfect time to understand the world of Germany’s own fringe culture, and the unprecedented big bang as a nation was put back together from two pieces, against the collapse of an entire political-economic regime and the global ripples it caused. It says something about Americans that the people pushed out of our own culture were able to find new opportunities and kindred spirits on the other side of the world.

And, actually, maybe the best way to escape techno as history museum is to actually learn the history.

The film, from creators Roman Schlaack, Denis Wrobel, and Thamash Kestawitz, runs just over an hour and a half.

Enjoy!

DE:

Das Rauschen einer Stadt erschließt sich nur demjenigen der ganz eintaucht. Anfang der 90er Jahre tauchte ein neues Geräusch auf. Es war ein kompromissloses elektrisches Geräusch. Irgendjemand sagte: „Das ist Techno!“ Damals eröffnete sich für eine Vielzahl von Menschen – um diesen neuen Klang herum – ein eigener Kosmos. Der vielseitige Partyalltag ließ Dresden zu einer Techno-Hochburg im Osten avancieren. Seitdem entwickelte sich eine aktive Musikszene, eine fast 30 Jahre existierende Kultur der elektronischen Musik in der Sächsischen Hauptstadt mit über 20 Plattenlabels und gut zwei dutzend Tanzklubs.

The post A documentary on Dresden’s techno scene, now free to watch appeared first on CDM Create Digital Music.

Get 5 of IK Multimedia’s most popular software titles for only $49.99 each

IK Multimedia Krazy Deal 50M YouTube

IK Multimedia has announced the launch of a new Krazy Deal in celebration of reaching 50 million views on YouTube. We want to say thank you to everyone who has watched IK throughout all of our years as a business, a family, and a provider of solutions for musicians. We recently hit 50 million views […]

The post Get 5 of IK Multimedia’s most popular software titles for only $49.99 each appeared first on rekkerd.org.

Welcome to YouTube Hell: A MIDI pack reseller silences criticism

YouTube is elevating new voices to prominence in music technology as in other fields. But the platform’s esoteric rules are also ripe for abuse – as one YouTube host claims.

The story begins with around a product, the Unison MIDI Chord Pack. This US$67 pack is already, on its surface, a bit strange. Understandably, users without musical training may like the idea of drag-and-drop chords and harmony – nothing wrong with that. But the actual product appears to be just a set of folders full of MIDI files … of, like, chords. Not real presets, but just raw MIDI chords. They even demo the product in Ableton Live, which already contains built-in chord and arpeggiator tools.

You can watch the demo video on their product page – at first, I couldn’t quite believe my eyes. They claim that this will help you to create chords “with the right notes, in the right order” without theory background – except most of the drag-and-drop material is made up of root position triads, labeled via terminology you’d need some theory to even read.

It’d be a little bit like someone selling you a Build Your Own House Construction Set that was made up of a bag of nails… and the nails were just ones they’d found lying on the ground. Maybe I’m missing something, but I definitely can’t figure out this product from their documentation.

Ave Mcree aka Traptendo, a well-known YouTube host, decided to take on the developers. Calling the product a “scam,” he says he pointed to other, free sources for the same MIDI content – meaning that, as it wasn’t actually original, at best the Unison product amounts to plagiarism.

As if it weren’t already strange enough that these developers were selling MIDI files of chords, they then responded to Ave Mcree’s video by filing a copyright claim. At this point, our story is picked up by Tim Webb at the excellent Discchord blog, who choose a nice, succinct headline:

Fuck Unison Audio [Discchord]

I’ve reached out to Unison for further comment.

Ave writes:

A video about Unison Audio copyright striking my “Unison Audio Chord MIDI Pack Scam” video! This is a channel strike which is affects my monetization rights and could get my channel deleted. I don’t care if that happens because I’m not going to stand for people hustling you. It’s sad that YouTube allows shills and dishonest companies to strike honest reviewers. It’s censorship at it finest! YouTube as a company has lost all of it’s charm when it stop caring about the community on here. Do I like doing videos like these? No, but it’s necessary when people are using their influence for the wrong things. I’m not knocking their hustle by NO MEANS, but offer a product that is 100% YOURS!!!!!

What makes this story so disturbing: not only is YouTube’s lax structure vulnerable to abuse, it seems to actively encourage scammers.

The copyright claim appears to be based on the the pack included for demonstration purposes in his video. While I’m not a lawyer, this should fall dead center under the doctrine of fair use as well as the royalty free license provided by the developers themselves.

Here’s where YouTube’s scale and automation, though, collide with the intricacies of copyright law requirements (mainly in the USA, but possibly soon impacted by changes in the European Union). It’s easy to file a copyright claim, but hard to get videos reinstated once that claim is filed.

As a result: there’s almost nothing stopping someone from filing a fraudulent copyright claim just because they don’t like your video. In this case, Unison can simply use a made-up copyright claim as a tool to kill a video they didn’t like.

You can read up on this world of hurt on Google’s own site:

Copyright strike basics

After all the recent fears about the EU and filtering, automated filtering doesn’t result in a strike – strikes require an explicit request. The problem is, creators have little recourse once that strike is processed. They can contact whomever made the complaint and get them to reverse it – which doesn’t work here, if Unison’s whole goal was removing the video. They can wait 90 days – an eternity in Internet time. Or they can file a “counter notification” – but even this is slow:

After we process your counter notification by forwarding it to the claimant, the claimant has 10 business days to provide us with evidence that they have initiated a court action to keep the content down. This time period is a requirement of copyright law, so please be patient.

Counter Notification Basics [Google Support]

It was only a matter of time before music and music tech encountered the problems with this system, as YouTube grows. Other online media – including CDM – are subject to liability for copyright and libel, as we should be. But legal systems are also set up to prevent frivolous claims, or attempts to use these rules simply to gag your critics. That’s not the case with YouTube; Google has an incentive to protect itself more than its creators, and it’s clear the system they’ve set up has inadequate protections against abuse.

What kind of abuse?

Fuck Jerry, the Instagram “influencer” agency that ripped off memes and helped build the ill-fated Fyre Festival, used copyright strikes to remove a video critical of its operation.

And the system has produced a swarm of copyright trolls.

And it gets worse from there: the system can result in outright extortion, with Google proving unresponsive to complains. The Verge reported on this phenomenon earlier this year, and while Google claimed to be working on the problem, observed that even major channels needed their woes to go viral before even getting a response from the company:

YouTube’s copyright strikes have become a tool for extortion

This isn’t the only problem on YouTube’s platform for music and music technology. While the service is promoting new personalities, disclosure around their relationships with sponsors are often opaque. Traptendo also observes that videos touting various tutorials on working with harmony may be sponsored by Unison Audio, with little or no acknowledgement of that relationship.

That same complaint has been leveled at CDM and me not to mention… okay, all the print magazines I’ve ever written for. But we at least have to answer for our credibility, or lose you as readers. (And sometimes losing you as readers is exactly what happens.) YouTube’s automated algorithms, by contrast, mean videos that simply mention the right keywords or appeal to particular machine heuristics can be promoted without any of that human judgment.

YouTube has unquestionable value, and to pretend otherwise would be foolhardy. Traptendo’s videos are great; I hope this one that was removed gets reinstated.

At the same time, we need to be aware of some of the downsides of this platform. And I’m concerned that we’ve become dependent on a single platform from a single vendor – which also means if anything goes wrong, creators are just as quickly de-platformed.

And regardless of what’s going on with YouTube, it’s also important for humans to spread the word – at least to say, friends don’t let friends spend their money on … chords.

I don’t believe all music “needs to be free,” but I would least say triads are. Actually, wait… I could use some spare spending money. Excuse me, I’m going to slip into the night to go sell some all-interval tetrachords on the black market.

Here’s Traptendo showing you how to mess with harmony in FL Studio – minus the overpriced “pack”:

Oh yeah and – check out Ave’s site on the open Web, complete with full blog:

https://djavemcree.net/

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